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MATSCI 90Q: Resilience, Transformation, and Equilibrium: the Science of Materials

In this course, we will explore the fundamentals of the kinetics of materials while relating them to different phenomena that we observe in our everyday lives. We will study the mechanisms and processes by which materials obtain the mechanical, electronic, and other properties that make them so useful to us. How can we cool water below freezing and keep it from turning into ice? Why is it that ice cream that has been in the freezer for too long does not taste as good? What are crystal defects and why do they help create some of the most useful (semiconductors) and beautiful (gemstones) things we have? This introductory seminar is open to all students, and prior exposure to chemistry, physics, or calculus is NOT required.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA
Instructors: Patta, Y. (PI)

MATSCI 142: Quantum Mechanics of Nanoscale Materials

Introduction to quantum mechanics and its application to the properties of materials. No prior background beyond a working knowledge of calculus and high school physics is presumed. Topics include: The Schrodinger equation and applications to understanding of the properties of quantum dots, semiconductor heterostructures, nanowires, and bulk solids. Tunneling processes and applications to nanoscale devices; the scanning tunneling microscope, and quantum cascade lasers. Simple models for the electronic properties and band structure of materials including semiconductors, insulators and metals and applications to semiconductor devices. Time-dependent perturbation theory and interaction of light with materials with applications to laser technology. Recommended: ENGR 50 or equivalent introductory materials science course. (Formerly 157)
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA

MATSCI 143: Materials Structure and Characterization

Students will study the theory and application of characterization techniques used to examine the structure of materials at the nanoscale. Students will learn to classify the structure of materials such as semiconductors, ceramics, metals, and nanotubes according to the principles of crystallography. Methods used widely in academic and industrial research, including X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy, will be demonstrated along with their application to the analysis of nanostructures. Prerequisites: E-50 or equivalent introductory materials science course. (Formerly 153)
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA

MATSCI 144: Thermodynamic Evaluation of Green Energy Technologies

Understand the thermodynamics and efficiency limits of modern green technologies such as carbon dioxide capture from air, fuel cells, batteries, and solar-thermal power. Recommended: ENGR 50 or equivalent introductory materials science course. (Formerly 154)
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA

MATSCI 151: Microstructure and Mechanical Properties (MATSCI 251)

Primarily for students without a materials background. Mechanical properties and their dependence on microstructure in a range of engineering materials. Elementary deformation and fracture concepts, strengthening and toughening strategies in metals and ceramics. Topics: dislocation theory, mechanisms of hardening and toughening, fracture, fatigue, and high-temperature creep. Undergraduates register in 151 for 4 units; graduates register for 251 in 3 units.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA

MATSCI 152: Electronic Materials Engineering

Materials science and engineering for electronic device applications. Kinetic molecular theory and thermally activated processes; band structure; electrical conductivity of metals and semiconductors; intrinsic and extrinsic semiconductors; elementary p-n junction theory; operating principles of light emitting diodes, solar cells, thermoelectric coolers, and transistors. Semiconductor processing including crystal growth, ion implantation, thin film deposition, etching, lithography, and nanomaterials synthesis.
Last offered: Spring 2019 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA

MATSCI 158: Soft Matter in Biomedical Devices, Microelectronics, and Everyday Life (BIOE 158)

The relationships between molecular structure, morphology, and the unique physical, chemical, and mechanical behavior of polymers and other types of soft matter are discussed. Topics include methods for preparing synthetic polymers and examination of how enthalpy and entropy determine conformation, solubility, mechanical behavior, microphase separation, crystallinity, glass transitions, elasticity, and linear viscoelasticity. Case studies covering polymers in biomedical devices and microelectronics will be covered. Recommended: ENGR 50 and Chem 31A or equivalent.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA

MATSCI 161: Energy Materials Laboratory (MATSCI 171)

From early church architecture through modern housing, windows are passages of energy and matter in the forms of light, sound and air. By letting in heat during the summer and releasing it in winter, windows can place huge demands on air conditioning and heating systems, thereby increasing energy consumption and raising greenhouse gas levels in the atmosphere. Latest advances in materials science have enabled precise and on-demand control of electromagnetic radiation through `smart¿ dynamic windows with photochromic and electrochromic materials that change color and optical density in response to light radiance and electrical potential. In this course, we will spend the whole quarter on a project to make and characterize dynamic windows based on one of the electrochromic material systems, the reversible electroplating of metal alloys. There will be an emphasis in this course on characterization methods such as scanning electron microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, optical spec more »
From early church architecture through modern housing, windows are passages of energy and matter in the forms of light, sound and air. By letting in heat during the summer and releasing it in winter, windows can place huge demands on air conditioning and heating systems, thereby increasing energy consumption and raising greenhouse gas levels in the atmosphere. Latest advances in materials science have enabled precise and on-demand control of electromagnetic radiation through `smart¿ dynamic windows with photochromic and electrochromic materials that change color and optical density in response to light radiance and electrical potential. In this course, we will spend the whole quarter on a project to make and characterize dynamic windows based on one of the electrochromic material systems, the reversible electroplating of metal alloys. There will be an emphasis in this course on characterization methods such as scanning electron microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, optical spectroscopy, four-point probe measurements of conductivity and electrochemical measurements (cyclic voltammetry). The course will finish with students giving presentations on the prospects of using dynamic windows and generic radiation control in cars, homes, commercial buildings or airplanes. Undergraduates register for 161 for 4 units; graduates register for 171 for 3 units.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA

MATSCI 162: X-Ray Diffraction Laboratory (MATSCI 172, PHOTON 172)

Experimental x-ray diffraction techniques for microstructural analysis of materials, emphasizing powder and single-crystal techniques. Diffraction from epitaxial and polycrystalline thin films, multilayers, and amorphorous materials using medium and high resolution configurations. Determination of phase purity, crystallinity, relaxation, stress, and texture in the materials. Advanced experimental x-ray diffraction techniques: reciprocal lattice mapping, reflectivity, and grazing incidence diffraction. Enrollment limited to 20. Undergraduates register for 162 for 4 units; graduates register for 172 for 3 units. Prerequisites: MATSCI 143 or equivalent course in materials characterization.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA

MATSCI 165: Nanoscale Materials Physics Computation Laboratory (MATSCI 175)

Computational exploration of fundamental topics in materials science using Java-based computation and visualization tools. Emphasis is on the atomic-scale origins of macroscopic materials phenomena. Simulation methods include molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo with applications in thermodynamics, kinetics, and topics in statistical mechanics. Undergraduates register for 165 for 4 units; graduates register for 175 for 3 units. Prerequisites: Undergraduate physics and MATSCI 144 or equivalent coursework in thermodynamics. MATSCI 145 recommended.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA
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