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281 - 290 of 397 results for: CSI::certificate

ME 243: Designing Emotion- for Reactive Car Interfaces

Students learn to define emotions as physiology, expression, and private experience using the automobile and shared space. Explores the meaning and impact of personal and user car experience. Reflective, narrative, and socio-cognitive techniques serve to make sense of car experiences; replay memories; examine engagement; understand user interviews. This course celebrates car fascination, and leads the student through finding and telling the car experience through discussion, ethnographic research, interviews, and diverse individual and collaborative narrative methods-verbal, non-verbal, and in car experiences. Methods draw from socio-cognitive psychology, design thinking, and fine art, and are applied to the car ⿿drive along⿝ or mobility experience. Course culminates in a final individual narrative presentation and group project demonstration.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Karanian, B. (PI)

ME 302B: The Future of the Automobile- Driver Assistance and Automated Driving

Automated vehicles are on the verge to productization and have been subject to a lot of news recently: GM bought a self-driving tech startup for presumably more than $1 billion. BMW, Intel and MobilEye teamed up to "bring fully autonomous driving to streets by 2021". Uber acquired Otto (another startup) for reportedly $680 million to lead Uber¿s self-driving car effort. MobilEye and Delphi announced "a partnership for Level 4/5 automated Driving solution for 2019". Ford announced to put a fleet of Level 4 autonomous vehicles on the road in 2021. Tesla is continuing to working on its Autopilot. Intel bought MobilEye. Sounds exciting ¿ if you have an idea what the terms and levels mean, and what the technology actually is, which is driving the vehicle automation. This class will provide a holistic introduction to the field of vehicle automation: The first three lectures will provide an overview, clarify terminology and categories, and dive into the legal and policy aspects of automated driving. The next three lectures discuss the technologies enabling vehicle automation and outline applications. Students are asked to work on a class assignment in groups discussing current topics of vehicle automation. The results of the group work will be presented in the final 2 lectures of the class. This is the second course of a 3-quarter seminar series, which build on one another but can be taken independently. This course, lectured by an industry expert, will introduce students to the technology behind the systems, the benefits, challenges, and future perspectives of this exciting field. Students will develop an understanding for the interactions of the technology, business, and public policies with a specific automotive focus.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit

ME 302C: The Future of the Automobile- Mobility Entrepreneurship

The objective of this course is to develop an understanding for the requirements that go into the design of a highly complex yet easy-to-use product, i.e. the automobile. Students will learn about very different interdisciplinary aspects that characterize the automobile and personal mobility. This is part of a multi-quarter seminar series, which build on one another but can be taken independently. This quarter, students will learn from 10 different founders / C-level executives about how they built their mobility startup to change the world of transportation. Previous classes included speakers from Tesla, Lyft, Pearl Auto, Turo, Nauto. In hearing these founder stories, students will get an insight not only into the world of entrepreneurship but also the multidisciplinary nature of the transportation industry. The course consists of 50-minute discussions with founders, with students encouraged to participate and ask questions of the founders. To obtain credit, students must attend 8 out of 10 classes including the first class.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit

ME 368A: Biodesign Innovation: Needs Finding and Concept Creation (BIOE 374A, MED 272A)

In this two-quarter course series ( BIOE 374A/B, MED 272A/B, ME 368A/B, OIT 384/5), multidisciplinary student teams identify real-world unmet healthcare needs, invent new health technologies to address them, and plan for their implementation into patient care. During the first quarter (winter), students select and characterize an important unmet healthcare problem, validate it through primary interviews and secondary research, and then brainstorm and screen initial technology-based solutions. In the second quarter (spring), teams select a lead solution and move it toward the market through prototyping, technical re-risking, strategies to address healthcare-specific requirements (regulation, reimbursement), and business planning. Final presentations in winter and spring are made to a panel of prominent health technology experts and/or investors. Class sessions include faculty-led instruction and case studies, coaching sessions by industry specialists, expert guest lecturers, and interactive team meetings. Enrollment is by application only, and students are expected to participate in both quarters of the course. Visit http://biodesign.stanford.edu/programs/stanford-courses/biodesign-innovation.html to access the application, examples of past projects, and student testimonials. More information about Stanford Biodesign, which has led to the creation of nearly 50 venture-backed healthcare companies and has helped hundreds of student launch health technology careers, can be found at http://biodesign.stanford.edu/.
Terms: Win | Units: 4

ME 368B: Biodesign Innovation: Concept Development and Implementation (BIOE 374B, MED 272B)

In this two-quarter course series ( BIOE 374A/B, MED 272A/B, ME 368A/B, OIT 384/5), multidisciplinary student teams identify real-world unmet healthcare needs, invent new health technologies to address them, and plan for their implementation into patient care. During the first quarter (winter), students select and characterize an important unmet healthcare problem, validate it through primary interviews and secondary research, and then brainstorm and screen initial technology-based solutions. In the second quarter (spring), teams select a lead solution and move it toward the market through prototyping, technical re-risking, strategies to address healthcare-specific requirements (regulation, reimbursement), and business planning. Final presentations in winter and spring are made to a panel of prominent health technology experts and/or investors. Class sessions include faculty-led instruction and case studies, coaching sessions by industry specialists, expert guest lecturers, and interactive team meetings. Enrollment is by application only, and students are expected to participate in both quarters of the course. Visit http://biodesign.stanford.edu/programs/stanford-courses/biodesign-innovation.html to access the application, examples of past projects, and student testimonials. More information about Stanford Biodesign, which has led to the creation of nearly 50 venture-backed healthcare companies and has helped hundreds of student launch health technology careers, can be found at http://biodesign.stanford.edu/.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4

MED 157: Foundations for Community Health Engagement

Open to undergraduate, graduate, and MD students. Examination and exploration of community health principles and their application at the local level. Designed to prepare students to make substantive contributions in a variety of community health settings (e.g. clinics, government agencies, non-profit organization, advocacy groups). Topics include community health assessment; health disparities; health promotion and disease prevention; strategies for working with diverse, low-income, and underserved populations; and principles of ethical and effective community engagement.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

MED 200: Primary Care Presentations

This course is a lecture series offered during the winter quarter. The aim of this seminar is to allow medical students to experience the mindset of primary care physicians in real time. Classes feature presentations of patient cases submitted by Stanford faculty. Faculty presenters are provided with the diagnostic information for the cases in a sequential manner during and not in advance of each class, allowing students to learn from the thought process of physicians in real time as they put together the differential diagnosis, interpret diagnostic information, deliberate treatment and management options, and discuss other thoughts about the cases.
Terms: Win | Units: 1

MED 212: Methods for Health Care Delivery Innovation, Implementation and Evaluation (CHPR 212, HRP 218)

Preference given to postgraduate fellows and graduate students. Focus is on implementation science and evaluation of health care delivery innovations. Topics include implementation science theory, frameworks, and measurement principles; qualitative and quantitative approaches to designing and evaluating new health care models; hybrid design trials that simultaneously evaluate implementation and effectiveness; distinction between quality improvement and research, and implications for regulatory requirements and publication; and grant-writing strategies for implementation science and evaluation. Students will develop a mock (or actual) grant proposal to conduct a needs assessment or evaluate a Stanford/VA/community intervention, incorporating concepts, frameworks, and methods discussed in class. Priority for enrollment for CHPR 212 will be given to CHPR master's students.
Terms: Win | Units: 2

MED 228: Physicians and Social Responsibility

Social and political context of the roles of physicians and health professionals in social change; policy, advocacy, and shaping public attitudes. How physicians have influenced governmental policy on nuclear arms proliferation; environmental health concerns; physicians in government; activism through research; the effects of poverty on health; homelessness; and gun violence. Guest speakers from national and international NGOs.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1
Instructors: Laws, A. (PI)

MED 232: Virtual Student Exchange in Global Health between Lebanon and Stanford

Timely topics in global health will be presented in a unique virtual student exchange with the joint participation of the Modern University for Business & Science in Beirut, Lebanon. The goal of this interactive series will be to encourage students to think about a broad range of topics in global health including coordinated responses to crises, ethical approaches to research and implementation work in low-income countries, and focused sessions on refugee health which will connect classrooms in Beirut and in Palo Alto. Complex humanitarian emergencies require cross-cultural collaboration, and this class will be structured to encourage working with overseas counterparts on the pressing Syrian refugee crisis. By integrating lectures, guest speakers, and a cross-cultural collaborative capstone project, students will gain an in-depth understanding of the global-health landscape and methods of addressing complex issues with partners abroad. Undergraduates must take this course for a letter grade and 3 units. MD students can enroll for 1-2 units, yet the course will require 2 units worth of work. Students enrolling in the course for a third unit will create a podcast related to a topic of their choice on refugee health. These students will participate in a weekly section to develop their podcast with the teaching team as well as learn from guest speakers different podcast communication skills. This extra section time will be announced based off of students' and the teaching teams' schedules. The student who makes the best podcast will travel to Beirut to meet and work with their counterparts for a week during winter break. This course will be limited to 20 students. Students will fill out an application after the first day of class to determine enrollment.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit
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