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341 - 350 of 513 results for: CSI::certificate

IPS 230: Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law (INTNLREL 114D, POLISCI 114D, POLISCI 314D)

Links among the establishment of democracy, economic growth, and the rule of law. How democratic, economically developed states arise. How the rule of law can be established where it has been historically absent. Variations in how such systems function and the consequences of institutional forms and choices. How democratic systems have arisen in different parts of the world. Available policy instruments used in international democracy, rule of law, and development promotion efforts.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5
Instructors: Fukuyama, F. (PI)

IPS 241: International Security in a Changing World (POLISCI 114S)

This class surveys the most pressing global security problems facing the world today and includes an award-winning two-day international crisis simulation. Past guest lecturers have included former Secretary of Defense William Perry, former U.S. Ambassador to Afghanistan Gen. Karl Eikenberry, and former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice. Major topics covered: changing types of warfare, ethics and conduct of war, nuclear proliferation, insurgency and terrorism, Russia, and ISIS. No prior background in international relations is necessary.
Terms: Win | Units: 5

IPS 244: U.S. Policy toward Northeast Asia

Case study approach to the study of contemporary U.S. policy towards Japan, Korea, and China. Historical evolution of U.S. foreign policy and the impact of issues such as democratization, human rights, trade, security relations, military modernization, and rising nationalism on U.S. policy. Case studies include U.S.-Japan trade tensions, anti-Americanism in Korea, and cross-straits relations between China and Taiwan. Satisfies the IPS Policy Writing Requirement.
Terms: Win | Units: 5

IPS 248: America's War in Afghanistan: Multiple Actors and Divergent Strategies

Establishing clear and consistent political-military objectives when waging limited wars is an essential but difficult task. Efforts to develop coherent campaign strategies are complicated by competing interests among US government actors (diplomatic, development, military and intelligence), members of the coalition intervention force, and relevant international organizations. This course will examine post-9/11 efforts to defeat Al Qaeda and stabilize Afghanistan from the perspectives of key US, international, and Afghan actors including the White House, State Department, Defense Department, Central Intelligence Agency, United Nations, NATO, Pakistan, and Afghan political elite and civil society. Classes will include presentations by individuals with firsthand diplomatic and military experience in Afghanistan and Pakistan.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4

IPS 255: Policy Practicum: Reforming INTERPOL's Governance Model

Today, the international community faces increasingly complex security challenges arising from transnational criminal activities. Effective international cooperation among national and local police agencies is critical in supporting efforts to combat cross-boundary criminal threats like terrorism, human trafficking, narcotics trafficking, and cybercrime. INTERPOL--the world's largest police organization--strives to innovate to adequately respond to the evolving threat landscape and remain at the forefront of global policing efforts. INTERPOL recently launched INTERPOL 2020 Initiative to review the Organization's strategy and priorities and develop a clear roadmap for strengthening its policing capabilities. INTERPOL 2020 will provide the strategic framework to ensure the Organization remains a strong and respected voice in global security matters. Students in this practicum will contribute to the INTERPOL 2020 Initiative. The practicum will focus in particular on comparative governance practices for international organizations. The practicum will consider other organizations' decision-making processes (acknowledging their respective mandates) and involvement of stakeholders; frameworks for regulatory compliance and accountability; and other good governance practices. The work product developed during the course of this Practicum would serve as a framework for INTERPOL to guide and support the development of its governance model. Select students of the Practicum may have the opportunity to pursue a summer internship at the Office of Legal Affairs, INTERPOL General Secretariat in Lyon, France and/or at INTERPOL Global Complex for Innovation in Singapore. The practicum is open to graduate students from outside the Law School with demonstrated interest and background in global security and international law, organizational behavior, and strategic management. After the term begins, students accepted into the course can transfer from section (01) into section (02), which meets the R requirement, with consent of the instructor. Elements used in grading: Class participation, Written Assignments, Paper. NOTE: Students may not count more than a combined total of eight units of directed research projects and policy lab practica toward graduation unless the additional counted units are approved in advance by the Petitions Committee. Such approval will be granted only for good cause shown. Even in the case of a successful petition for additional units, a student cannot receive a letter grade for more than eight units of independent research (Policy Lab practicum, Directed Research, Senior Thesis, and/or Research Track). Any units taken in excess of eight will be graded on a mandatory pass basis. For detailed information, see "Directed Research/Policy Labs" in the SLS Student Handbook. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline. Cross-listed with LAW 805Z.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-3

IPS 264: Behind the Headlines: An Introduction to US Foreign Policy in South and East Asia

Introduction to India, Af-Pak and China. Analyzes historical forces that shaped the region, recent history and current state of key countries: the economic and political rise of India and China; rise of the Taliban and Al Qaeda in Afghanistan; Pakistan's government, military, and mullahs; and China's impact on the region. nExplores U.S. policy in depth: U.S. intervention in- and upcoming withdrawal from Afghanistan, U.S. relations with Pakistan and India, the "pivot to Asia" and its implications for US-China relations and the strategic balance in Asia. nSatisfies the IPS policy writing requirement.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Manuel, A. (PI)

IPS 270: The Geopolitics of Energy

The global energy landscape is undergoing seismic shifts with game-changing economic, political and environmental ramifications. Technological breakthroughs are expanding the realms of production, reshuffling the competition among different sources of energy and altering the relative balance of power between energy exporters and importers. The US shale oil and gas bonanza is replacing worries about foreign oil dependence with an exuberance about the domestic resurgence of energy-intensive sectors. China¿s roaring appetite for energy imports propels its national oil companies to global prominence. Middle Eastern nations that used to reap power from oil wealth are bracing for a struggle for political relevance. Many African energy exporters are adopting promising strategies to break with a history dominated by the ¿resource curse¿.nThis course provides students with the knowledge, skill set and professional network to analyze how the present and past upheavals in oil and gas markets affect energy exporters and importers, their policymaking, and their relative power. Students will gain a truly global perspective thanks to a series of exciting international guest speakers and the opportunity to have an impact by working on a burning issue for a real world client. Satisfies the IPS Policy Writing Requirement.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Jojarth, C. (PI)

IPS 274: International Urbanization Seminar: Cross-Cultural Collaboration for Sustainable Urban Development (CEE 126, EARTHSYS 138, URBANST 145)

Comparative approach to sustainable cities, with focus on international practices and applicability to China. Tradeoffs regarding land use, infrastructure, energy and water, and the need to balance economic vitality, environmental quality, cultural heritage, and social equity. Student teams collaborate with Chinese faculty and students partners to support urban sustainability projects. Limited enrollment via application; see internationalurbanization.org for details. Prerequisites: consent of the instructor(s).
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5

JEWISHST 384C: Genocide and Humanitarian Intervention (HISTORY 224C, HISTORY 324C, JEWISHST 284C, PEDS 224)

Open to medical students, graduate students, and undergraduate students. Traces the history of genocide in the 20th century and the question of humanitarian intervention to stop it, a topic that has been especially controversial since the end of the Cold War. The pre-1990s discussion begins with the Armenian genocide during the First World War and includes the Holocaust and Cambodia under the Khmer Rouge in the 1970s. Coverage of genocide and humanitarian intervention since the 1990s includes the wars in Bosnia, Rwanda, Kosovo, the Congo and Sudan.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

LAW 805Z: Policy Practicum: Reforming INTERPOL's Governance Model

Today, the international community faces increasingly complex security challenges arising from transnational criminal activities. Effective international cooperation among national and local police agencies is critical in supporting efforts to combat cross-boundary criminal threats like terrorism, human trafficking, narcotics trafficking, and cybercrime. INTERPOL--the world's largest police organization--strives to innovate to adequately respond to the evolving threat landscape and remain at the forefront of global policing efforts. INTERPOL recently launched INTERPOL 2020 Initiative to review the Organization's strategy and priorities and develop a clear roadmap for strengthening its policing capabilities. INTERPOL 2020 will provide the strategic framework to ensure the Organization remains a strong and respected voice in global security matters. Students in this practicum will contribute to the INTERPOL 2020 Initiative. The practicum will focus in particular on comparative governance practices for international organizations. The practicum will consider other organizations' decision-making processes (acknowledging their respective mandates) and involvement of stakeholders; frameworks for regulatory compliance and accountability; and other good governance practices. The work product developed during the course of this Practicum would serve as a framework for INTERPOL to guide and support the development of its governance model. Select students of the Practicum may have the opportunity to pursue a summer internship at the Office of Legal Affairs, INTERPOL General Secretariat in Lyon, France and/or at INTERPOL Global Complex for Innovation in Singapore. The practicum is open to graduate students from outside the Law School with demonstrated interest and background in global security and international law, organizational behavior, and strategic management. After the term begins, students accepted into the course can transfer from section (01) into section (02), which meets the R requirement, with consent of the instructor. Elements used in grading: Class participation, Written Assignments, Paper. NOTE: Students may not count more than a combined total of eight units of directed research projects and policy lab practica toward graduation unless the additional counted units are approved in advance by the Petitions Committee. Such approval will be granted only for good cause shown. Even in the case of a successful petition for additional units, a student cannot receive a letter grade for more than eight units of independent research (Policy Lab practicum, Directed Research, Senior Thesis, and/or Research Track). Any units taken in excess of eight will be graded on a mandatory pass basis. For detailed information, see "Directed Research/Policy Labs" in the SLS Student Handbook. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline. Cross-listed with International Policy Studies ( IPS 255).
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-3
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