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321 - 330 of 513 results for: CSI::certificate

HUMBIO 151R: Biology, Health and Big Data

We are living in the midst of a revolution in the accessibility and availability of biological and medical data. How can all this data be used to improve human health? In this course, students will look at case studies from diabetes and cancer research to learn how to access publicly available data ranging from gene or protein level datasets to information about clinical trials. Students will apply what they learn from the case studies to develop a research proposal and presentation on a biology-related topic of their choice. The class will have a small group workshop-type format. Students will gain skills in research methods including accessing, analyzing and presenting data. There will be exercises using the statistical package R. Prior programming experience is not required. Prerequisites: HumBio 2A, 3A or equivalent.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: Salmeen, A. (PI)

HUMBIO 154C: Cancer Epidemiology

Clinical epidemiological methods relevant to human research in cancer will be the focus. The concepts of risk; case control, cohort, and cross-sectional studies; clinical trials; bias; confounding; interaction; screening; and causal inference will be introduced and applied. Social, political, economic, and ethical controversies surrounding cancer screening, prevention, and research will be considered. Human Biology 154 courses can be taken separately or as a series. Prerequisite: Human Biology core or equivalent, or instructor consent.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR

HUMBIO 159: Genes and Environment in Disease Causation: Implications for Medicine and Public Health (HRP 238)

The historical, contemporary, and future research and practice among genetics, epidemiology, clinical medicine, and public health as a source of insight for medicine and public health. Genetic and environmental contributions to multifactorial diseases; multidisciplinary approach to enhancing detection and diagnosis. The impact of the Human Genome Project on analysis of cardiovascular and neurological diseases, and cancer. Ethical and social issues in the use of genetic information. Prerequisite: basic course in genetics; for undergraduates, Human Biology core or equivalent or consent of instructor. This course must be taken for a minimum of 3 units and a letter grade to be eligible for Ways credit.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA
Instructors: Popat, R. (PI)

HUMBIO 166: Food and Society: Exploring Eating Behaviors in Social, Environmental, and Policy Context (CHPR 166)

The material in this course is an introduction to the field and the target audience is undergraduates. It may be of interest to graduate students unfamiliar with the field. The class examines the array of forces that affect the foods human beings eat, and when, where, and how we eat them, including human labor, agriculture, environmental sustainability, politics, animal rights/welfare, ethics, policy, culture, economics, business, law, trade, and ideology, and psychology. The class addresses the impact of current policies and actions that might be taken to improve human nutrition and health; macro-scale influences on food, nutrition, and eating behavior. . Undergraduate Prerequisite: Human Biology Core or equivalent or consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 4

INDE 225: Popular and Clinical Nutrition: Food Facts, Fads, and Pharmacology

Designed for medical students and other health care professionals. Lunchtime lectures review the epidemiological and clinical research related to eating patterns and misconceptions of the public, the mechanisms of pharmacological effects of food, and related topics common to patient nutritional concerns. Topics include fad diets, the impact of dietary addiction, longevity associated with caloric restriction, toxins in foods and the action of phytonutirents. Epidemiological, clinical, and biochemical studies are reviewed in the discussion of these and other topics.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1

INTNLREL 114D: Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law (IPS 230, POLISCI 114D, POLISCI 314D)

Links among the establishment of democracy, economic growth, and the rule of law. How democratic, economically developed states arise. How the rule of law can be established where it has been historically absent. Variations in how such systems function and the consequences of institutional forms and choices. How democratic systems have arisen in different parts of the world. Available policy instruments used in international democracy, rule of law, and development promotion efforts.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI
Instructors: Fukuyama, F. (PI)

INTNLREL 123: The Future of the European Union: Challenges and Opportunities

First, this course analyzes the EU's greatest challenge, preserving the monetary union, and discusses the political and economic reforms needed to achieve that goal. In this context the course also studies the fiscal and budgetary polices of the EU. Second, the course discusses the EU's role in global politics, its desire to play a more prominent role, and the ways to reach that objective. Third, the course analyzes the EU's institutional challenges in its efforts to enhance its democratic character.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Crombez, C. (PI)

INTNLREL 135A: International Environmental Law and Policy

This course addresses the nature, content, and structure of international environmental law. We will discuss its sources (formal and informal) and general principles, along with the emerging principles (sustainable development, precautionary principle, etc.) We will evaluate the role of international and non-governmental organizations, as well as examine the negotiation, conclusion, and implementation of international environmental agreements. Problem areas to be examined include global warming, stratospheric ozone depletion, exports of hazardous substances, transboundary pollution, trade and environment, and development and environment. RECOMMENDED PREREQ: students have completed POLISCI 101 and/or INTNLREL 140A
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Lutomski, P. (PI)

INTNLREL 136R: Introduction to Global Justice (ETHICSOC 136R, PHIL 76, POLISCI 136R, POLISCI 336)

This course provides an overview of core ethical problems in international politics, with special emphasis on the question of what demands justice imposes on institutions and agents acting in a global context. The course is divided into three sections. The first investigates the content of global justice, and comprises of readings from contemporary political theorists and philosophers who write within the liberal contractualist, utilitarian, cosmopolitan, and nationalist traditions. The second part of the course looks at the obligations which global justice generates in relation to five issues of international concern ¿ global poverty, climate change, immigration, warfare, and well-being of women. The final section of the course asks whether a democratic international order is necessary for global justice to be realized.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-EthicReas, WAY-ER
Instructors: Datta, P. (PI)

INTNLREL 141A: Camera as Witness: International Human Rights Documentaries

Rarely screened documentary films, focusing on global problems, human rights issues, and aesthetic challenges in making documentaries on international topics. Meetings with filmmakers.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-ED
Instructors: Bojic, J. (PI)
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