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1 - 3 of 3 results for: stamos

CS 152: Trust and Safety Engineering

An introduction to the ways consumer internet services are abused to cause real human harm and the potential operational, product and engineering responses. Students will learn about spam, fraud, account takeovers, the use of social media by terrorists, misinformation, child exploitation, harassment, bullying and self-harm. This will include studying both the technical and sociological roots of these harms and the ways various online providers have responded. Our goal is to provide students with an understanding of how the technologies they may build have been abused in the past and how they might spot future abuses earlier. The class will be taught by a long-time practitioner and supplemented by guest lecturers from local companies. Content note: This class will cover real-world harmful behavior and expose students to potentially upsetting material. Submit an application for the class at: http://cs152app.stanford.edu
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 3
Instructors: Stamos, A. (PI)

INTLPOL 268: Hack Lab

(Formerly IPS 268) This course aims to give students a solid understanding of the most common types of attacks used in cybercrime and cyberwarfare. Taught by a long-time cybersecurity practitioner, a recovering cyberlaw litigator, and a group of hearty, motivated TAs, each session will begin with a lecture covering the basics of an area of technology and how that technology has been misused in the past. Students will then complete a lab section, with the guidance of the instructor and assistants, where they attack a known insecure system using techniques and tools seen in the field. Each week, there will be a second lecture on the legal and policy impacts of the technologies and techniques we cover. By the end of the course, students are expected to have a basic understanding of some of the most common offensive techniques in use today as well as a comprehensive overview of the most important aspects of cyberpolicy and law. No computer science background is required. All students must have access to a Windows, Mac OS X or Linux laptop. Students must enroll in the lecture as well as one computer lab via Axess.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

LAW 4049: Hack Lab

This course aims to give students a solid understanding of the most common types of attacks used in cybercrime and cyberwarfare. Taught by a long-time cybersecurity practitioner, a recovering cyberlaw litigator, and a group of hearty, motivated TAs, each session will begin with a lecture covering the basics of an area of technology and how that technology has been misused in the past. Students will then complete a lab section, with the guidance of the instructor and assistants, where they attack a known insecure system using techniques and tools seen in the field. Each week, there will be a second lecture on the legal and policy impacts of the technologies and techniques we cover. By the end of the course, students are expected to have a basic understanding of some of the most common offensive techniques in use today as well as a comprehensive overview of the most important aspects of cyberpolicy and law. No computer science background is required. All students must have access to a Wi more »
This course aims to give students a solid understanding of the most common types of attacks used in cybercrime and cyberwarfare. Taught by a long-time cybersecurity practitioner, a recovering cyberlaw litigator, and a group of hearty, motivated TAs, each session will begin with a lecture covering the basics of an area of technology and how that technology has been misused in the past. Students will then complete a lab section, with the guidance of the instructor and assistants, where they attack a known insecure system using techniques and tools seen in the field. Each week, there will be a second lecture on the legal and policy impacts of the technologies and techniques we cover. By the end of the course, students are expected to have a basic understanding of some of the most common offensive techniques in use today as well as a comprehensive overview of the most important aspects of cyberpolicy and law. No computer science background is required. All students must have access to a Windows, Mac OS X or Linux laptop. Students must enroll in the lecture as well as one Computer Lab (Lab meets 50 minutes once a week). Special Instructions: This class is limited to 120 students with 30 spots for SLS students. If more than 30 SLS students wish to enroll, instructor permission is required. Elements used in grading: Class participation, written assignments, take-home midterm, and a final exam. Cross-listed with International Policy ( INTLPOL 268). Law students see INTLPOL listing for Computer Lab section meeting times.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
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