2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020 2020-2021
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 
  COVID-19 Scheduling Updates!
Due to recent announcements about Autumn Quarter (see the President's update), please expect ongoing changes to the class schedule.

551 - 560 of 1106 results for: all courses

HISTORY 195: Modern Korean History

(Same as HISTORY 95. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 195.) This lecture course provides a general introduction to the history of modern Korea. Themes include the characteristics of the Chosôn dynasty, reforms and rebellions in the nineteenth century, Korean nationalism; Japan's colonial rule and Korean identities; decolonization and the Korean War; and the different state-building processes in North and South, South Korea's democratization in 1980s, and the current North Korean crisis.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Moon, Y. (PI)

HISTORY 195C: Modern Japanese History: From Samurai to Pokemon

(Same as HISTORY 95C. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 195C.) Japan's modern transformation from the late 19th century to the present. Topics include: the Meiji revolution; industrialization and social dislocation; the rise of democracy and empire; total war and US occupation; economic miracle and malaise; Japan as soft power; and politics of memory. Readings and films focus on the lived experience of ordinary men and women across social classes and regions.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI

HISTORY 198: The History of Modern China

(Same as HISTORY 98. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 198.) This course charts major historical transformations in modern China, and will be of interest to those concerned with Chinese politics, culture, society, ethnicity, economy, gender, international relations, and the future of the world.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI

HISTORY 200B: Doing Environmental History: Climate Change... the podcast

This will be a hands-on course that will emphasize how to do environmental history. Students will reflect on what it means to think historically about a pressing contemporary problem--climate change. We will ask historical questions, produce historical knowledge, and as a critical part of the course, present that knowledge to a general audience in the form of a podcast. This course forms part of the "Doing History" series: rigorous undergraduate colloquia that introduce the practice of history within a particular field or thematic area.
Last offered: Spring 2019 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, WAY-SI

HISTORY 200D: Doing the History of Science and Technology

The history of science has often been at the crux of key debates in the larger field of history, including debates over objectivity and bias, relativism and the problem of "present-ism." This course explores key questions, methods and debates in the history of science and examines how historians of science have addressed these organizing problems of the historical discipline. This course forms part of the "Doing History" series: rigorous undergraduate colloquia that introduce the practice of history within a particular field or thematic area.
Last offered: Spring 2020 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

HISTORY 200F: Doing Microhistory

The genre of microhistory was expressly invented in the 1970s to recover the voices of people usually neglected in the past, often based on scanty sources. It's an exciting and risky endeavor, as the historian often has to fill in details lacking in the sources, a historical tightrope act. Class includes three sessions with authors of microhistory who share how they met these challenges:Profs. Zipperstein and Stokes (Stanford) and Getz (San Francisco State).
Last offered: Autumn 2019 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

HISTORY 200J: Doing Oral History (AMSTUD 200J)

Students explore exemplary historical works based on oral histories and develop a range of practical skills while completing their own interviews. Topics include oral history and narrative theory, interview techniques, transcript preparation, and digital archiving. Students also learn how to analyze interviews using both qualitative and quantitative methods, practice writing history using oral evidence, and experiment with digital humanities approaches for disseminating oral history, including the Stanford Oral History Text Analysis Project. This course forms part of the "Doing History" series: rigorous undergraduate colloquia that introduce the practice of history within a particular field or thematic area.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

HISTORY 200L: Doing Public History (CSRE 201L)

Examines history outside the classroom; its role in political/cultural debates in U.S. and abroad. Considers functions, practices, and reception of history in public arena, including museums, memorials, naming of buildings, courtrooms, websites, op-eds. Analyzes controversies arising when historians' work outside the academy challenges the status quo; role funders, interest groups, and the public play in promoting, shaping, or suppressing historical interpretation. Who gets to tell a group's story? What changes can public history enable? Students will engage in public history projects.
Last offered: Spring 2020 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

HISTORY 200R: Doing Community History: Asian Americans and the Pandemic (AMSTUD 200R, ASNAMST 201)

Students utilize a community-engaged oral history methodology to produce short video documentaries focused on Asian Americans in the Covid-19 pandemic. In producing these collaborative digital history projects, students learn to evaluate the ways social power influences historical documentation at various levels including the making of sources, the construction of archives, and the telling of historical narratives. We ask: how have race and racism, ethnicity and community, gender and class, shaped the ways that the pandemic has influenced the lives of Asian Americans? To what extent have Asian American experiences with the pandemic been shaped by the recent global protests for racial justice and Black liberation? In studying the pandemic and its relationship to histories of race and racism, how should we understand the place of Asian Americans?
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Gow, W. (PI)

HISTORY 201: From Confederate Monuments to Wikipedia: The Politics of Remembering the Past

Gateway course for Public History/Public Service track. Examines various ways history is used outside of the classroom, and its role in political/cultural debates in the U.S. and abroad. Showcases issues and careers in public history with guest speakers.
Last offered: Spring 2018 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
teaching presence
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints