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331 - 340 of 771 results for: all courses

HISTORY 63N: The Feminist Critique: The History and Politics of Gender Equality (AMSTUD 63N, CSRE 63N, FEMGEN 63N)

This course explores the emergence of concepts of gender equality in world history. It asks how gender inequality relates to racial, ethnicity, and sexual identities, how men engage with feminism, whether gender equality is purely a western cultural tradition, and much more. We approach the long history of ideas about gender and equality by reading primary historical documents from around the world, moving from the 15th century to the present. Topics include education, the body, sexuality, violence, labor, and politics.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI
Instructors: Freedman, E. (PI)

HISTORY 64: Racial and Ethnic Diversity in Modern America (CSRE 64)

How ethnicity influenced the American experience and how prevailing attitudes about racial and ethnic groups over time have affected the historical and contemporary reality of the nation's major minority populations. Focus is on the past two centuries.
Last offered: Winter 2014 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

HISTORY 65D: The Pacific World

(Same as HISTORY 165D. Majors and others taking 5 units, enroll in 165D.) Taking the Pacific and the regions of the world that touch the ocean as the unit of analysis, we will explore geographic, social, cultural, and political interactions that created what we now call the Pacific World. Ranging over four hundred years of history, we will examine human migrations, explorations, interactions and conflicts, and human ecology. The course is not nation-focused but is transnational and international in approach.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI
Instructors: Chang, G. (PI)

HISTORY 69S: Race, Science, and Medicine in U.S. History (CSRE 69M, FEMGEN 69S)

How have scientific ideas about race been shaped by their historical contexts, and what effects do these ideas have on people, institutions, law, and medicine? Is racial science always racist science? How do ideas about race intersect with ideas about gender, class, and disability? This course explores how natural philosophers and scientists have defined, used, and sometimes challenged ideas about race from the eighteenth century to today. Topics include medicine and slavery, eugenics, sociology, psychiatry, race-based medicine, and genetic ancestry. This course fulfills the departmental Sources and Methods requirement. Priority given to history majors and minors.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: LeBlanc, H. (PI)

HISTORY 70: Culture, Politics, and Society in Latin America

(Same as HISTORY 170B. History majors and others taking 5 units, enroll in HISTORY 170B.) The course of Latin American history from the colonial era to the present day. Key issues such as colonialism, nationalism, democracy, and revolution will be examined critically in light of broad comparative themes in Latin American and world history. Sources include writings in the social sciences as well as primary documents, fiction, and film.
Last offered: Autumn 2014 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

HISTORY 73S: History of the Police in the United States: Slave Patrols to Ferguson

How did police come to have the power to use violence? Themes: growth of professional policing, creation of private police forces and vigilantism, and public portrayals of police--by Hollywood and the press. The historical relationship between race and the administration of policing is a central question. Students will hone the methodology necessary to examine primary sources such as police memoirs, court records, police files, detective novels, music videos and photographs. The course fulfills the departmental Sources and Methods requirement. Priority given to history majors and minors.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Adams, B. (PI)

HISTORY 78N: Film and History of Latin American Revolutions and Counterrevolutions

In this course we will watch and critique films made about Latin America's 20th century revolutions focusing on the Mexican, Cuban, Chilean and Nicaraguan revolutions. We will analyze the films as both social and political commentaries and as aesthetic and cultural works, alongside archivally-based histories of these revolutions.
Last offered: Spring 2015 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

HISTORY 78Q: Film and History of Latin American Revolutions and Counterrevolutions

In this course we will watch and critique films made about Latin America's 20th century revolutions focusing on the Mexican, Cuban, Chilean and Nicaraguan revolutions. We will analyze the films as both social and political commentaries and as aesthetic and cultural works, alongside archivally-based histories of these revolutions.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI
Instructors: Wolfe, M. (PI)

HISTORY 82C: Making of the Islamic World, 600-1500

(Same as HISTORY 182C. Majors and other taking 5 units, register for 182C.) The History of Islam and Muslim peoples from 600-1500. Topics include Muhammad and his community; the early Arab conquests and empires; sectarian movements; formation of Islamic belief, thought, legal culture and religious institutions; transregional Sufi and learned networks; family and sexuality; urban, rural and nomadic life; non-Muslim communities; the development of Mediterranean and Indian Ocean trade; relations with Byzantium, the Latin West, China; the Crusades and the Mongols.
Last offered: Spring 2015 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI

HISTORY 83S: Refugees of Palestine and Syria: History, Identity, and Politics of Exile in the Middle East

Mass displacements of Palestinians (1948, 1967) and Syrians (2011-) remain crucial to our understanding of history and politics of the modern Middle East. The course topics include the media's role in alleviating or worsening refugee crises, the Palestinian "right of return," and the place of religion in the Syrian civil war. By looking at autobiographies, graffiti, revolutionary posters, and music, we will study the construction of refugee identities, through the prism of race, ethnicity, statelessness, gender, and sexual orientation. Priority given to history majors and minors.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI
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