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231 - 240 of 1014 results for: all courses

CSRE 147A: Race and Ethnicity Around the World (SOC 147, SOC 247)

(Graduate students register for 247.) How have the definitions, categories, and consequences of race and ethnicity differed across time and place? This course offers a historical and sociological survey of racialized divisions around the globe. Case studies include: affirmative action policies, policies of segregation and ghettoization, countries with genocidal pasts, invisible minorities, and countries that refuse to count their citizens by race at all.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

CSRE 148: Comparative Ethnic Conflict (SOC 148, SOC 248)

Causes and consequences of racial and ethnic conflict, including nationalist movements, ethnic genocide, civil war, ethnic separatism, politics, indigenous peoples' movements, and minority rights movements around the world.
Last offered: Winter 2013 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

CSRE 148R: Los Angeles: A Cultural History (AMSTUD 148)

This course traces a cultural history of Los Angeles from the early twentieth century to the present. Approaching popular representations of Los Angeles as our primary source, we discuss the ways that diverse groups of Angelenos have represented their city on the big and small screens, in the press, in the theater, in music, and in popular fiction. We focus in particular on the ways that conceptions of race and gender have informed representations of the city. Possible topics include: fashion and racial violence in the Zoot Suit Riots of the Second World War, Disneyland as a suburban fantasy, cinematic representations of Native American life in Bunker Hill in the 1961 film The Exiles, the independent black cinema of the Los Angeles Rebellion, the Anna Deaver Smith play Twilight Los Angeles about the civil unrest that gripped the city in 1992, and the 2019 film Once Upon a Time¿in Hollywood.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Gow, W. (PI)

CSRE 149A: The Urban Underclass (SOC 149, SOC 249, URBANST 112)

(Graduate students register for 249.) Recent research and theory on the urban underclass, including evidence on the concentration of African Americans in urban ghettos, and the debate surrounding the causes of poverty in urban settings. Ethnic/racial conflict, residential segregation, and changes in the family structure of the urban poor.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

CSRE 150A: Race and Crime (PSYCH 150)

The goal of this course is to examine social psychological perspectives on race, crime, and punishment in the United States. Readings will be drawn not only from psychology, but also from sociology, criminology, economics, and legal studies. We will consider the manner in which social psychological variables may operate at various points in the crimina; justice system- from policing, to sentencing, to imprisonment, to re-entry. Conducted as a seminar. Students interested in participating should attend the first session and complete online application for permission at https://goo.gl/forms/CAut7RKX6MewBIuG3.
Last offered: Spring 2018 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

CSRE 150S: Nineteenth Century America (AFRICAAM 150B, AMSTUD 150B, HISTORY 150B)

(Same as HISTORY 50B. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 150B.) Territorial expansion, social change, and economic transformation. The causes and consequences of the Civil War. Topics include: urbanization and the market revolution; slavery and the Old South; sectional conflict; successes and failures of Reconstruction; and late 19th-century society and culture.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-SI
Instructors: White, R. (PI)

CSRE 153C: Asylum: Knowledge, Politics, and Population (ANTHRO 153)

This course draws from ethnography, social theory, media and literature to examines the place of the asylum in the constitution of knowledge, politics, and populations. An ancient juridical concept, asylum has been used to describe a fundamental political right, medical and penal institutions, as well as emergent spaces of care and safety. As such, thus course invites students to think of critical issues associated with asylum, including: illness, trauma, violence, immigration, displacement, human rights, sanctuary, and testimony.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER, WAY-SI

CSRE 154T: The Politics of Algorithms (COMM 154, COMM 254, SOC 154, SOC 254C)

Algorithms have become central actors in today's digital world. In areas as diverse as social media, journalism, education, healthcare, and policing, computing technologies increasingly mediate communication processes. This course will provide an introduction to the social and cultural forces shaping the construction, institutionalization, and uses of algorithms. In so doing, we will explore how algorithms relate to political issues of modernization, power, and inequality. Readings will range from social scientific analyses to media coverage of ongoing controversies relating to Big Data. Students will leave the course with a better appreciation of the broader challenges associated with researching, building, and using algorithms.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

CSRE 156: The Changing American City (SOC 156A, SOC 256A, URBANST 156A)

After decades of decline, U.S. cities today are undergoing major transformations. Young professionals are flocking to cities instead of fleeing to the suburbs. Massive increases in immigration have transformed the racial and ethnic diversity of cities and their neighborhoods. Public housing projects that once defined the inner city are disappearing, and crime rates have fallen dramatically. Do these changes signal the end of residential segregation and urban inequality? Who do these changes benefit? This course will explore these issues and strategies to address them through readings and discussion, analyzing a changing neighborhood in a major city in the Bay Area in groups (which will include at least one site visit), and studying a changing neighborhood or city of their choice for their final project. The course does not have pre-requisites.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Hwang, J. (PI)

CSRE 162: The Politics of Sex: Work, Family, and Citizenship in Modern American Women's History (AMSTUD 161, FEMGEN 161, HISTORY 61, HISTORY 161)

This course explores the transition from Victorian to modern American womanhood by asking how Native, European, African, Mexican, and Asian American women navigated the changing sexual, economic, and political landscapes of the twentieth century. Through secondary readings, primary sources, films, music, and literature we explore the opportunities and boundaries on groups of women in the context of historical events that included immigration, urbanization, wartime, depression, the Cold War, as well as recurrent feminist and conservative political movements.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Freedman, E. (PI)
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