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HISTORY 207: Biography and History (HISTORY 308)

The relationship between biographical and historical writing, primarily in Europe and America. Problems of methodology, evidence, dispassion, and empathy. Texts: biographies, critical literature on biographical work, and novels (A. S. Byatt's Possession, Bernard Malamud's Dubin's Lives) that illuminate the intellectual underpinnings of biographical labor.
Last offered: Spring 2010 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum

HISTORY 208: Private Lives, Public Stories: Autobiography in Women's History

Changing contexts of women's lives and how women's actions have shaped and responded to those contexts.
Last offered: Winter 2010 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender

HISTORY 208B: Women Activists' Response to War (FEMGEN 208B, HISTORY 308B)

Theoretical issues, historical origins, changing forms of women's activism in response to war throughout the 20th century, and contemporary cases, such as the Russian Committee of Soldiers Mothers, Bosnian Mothers of Srebrenica, Serbian Women in Black, and the American Cindy Sheehan. Focus is on the U.S. and Eastern Europe, with attention to Israel, England, and Argentina.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender
Instructors: Jolluck, K. (PI)

HISTORY 221A: Men, Women, and Power in Early Modern Russia, 1500-1800

Social values, gender relations, and social change in an era of rapid change; challenges to established norms by new constructions of deviance (witchcraft, religious reform, and revolt) and new standards of civility; encounters with non-Russians and the construction of national consciousness. Social values as political ethos: patrimonial autocracy and the reality of female rule in the late 17th and 18th century.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-SI

HISTORY 223: Art and Ideas in Imperial Russia (HISTORY 323)

Poetry, novels, symphonic music, theater, opera, painting, design, and architecture: what they reveal about the politics and culture of tsarist Russia.
Last offered: Winter 2009 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum

HISTORY 231C: The Great War: WWI in Literature, Film, Art, and Memory (FRENCH 258, FRENCH 358, HISTORY 332C)

This course concerns how writers, artists, and other cultural producers understood and represented the traumas of the First World War and its aftermath. Rather than tracing a political or military history of the conflict, we¿ll focus on how the horrors of War (both in the trenches and on the home front) fostered broader social and cultural shifts, as people questioned the very foundations of European civilization. Most specifically, we'll explore the connections between the War and the emergence of post-War modernist movements, as writers and artists created new works to help them make sense of the catastrophe and the new world it wrought. Though France provides our starting point, we'll also travel beyond the Hexagon to incorporate other views and major works. Course readings will be in English, though students may elect to read works in French if they wish.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum
Instructors: Braude, M. (PI)

HISTORY 233C: Two British Revolutions (HISTORY 333C)

Current scholarship on Britain,1640-1700, focusing on political and religious history. Topics include: causes and consequences of the English civil war and revolution; rise and fall of revolutionary Puritanism; the Restoration; popular politics in the late 17th century; changing contours of religious life; the crisis leading to the Glorious Revolution; and the new order that emerged after the deposing of James II.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-SI
Instructors: Como, D. (PI)

HISTORY 233F: Political Thought in Early Modern Britain

1500 to 1700. Theorists include Hobbes, Locke, Harrington, the Levellers, and lesser known writers and schools. Foundational ideas and problems underlying modern British and American political thought and life.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum

HISTORY 236B: Hobbes to Habermas: The Idea of Society in Modern Thought (HISTORY 336B)

Classic texts in social theory from the seventeenth century to the present. Readings include Locke, Smith, Hegel, Comte, and Durkheim, and Weber.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum
Instructors: Baker, K. (PI)

HISTORY 239E: Paris: The Making of a Modern Icon (FRENCH 227, URBANST 142)

Few places have been as heavily romanticized and mythologized as Paris. To many observers, Paris and its attractions serve as icons of modernity itself. By engaging with fiction, film, journalism, painting, photography, poetry, song, and other media, we¿ll trace how different people at different times have used Paris as both backdrop and main protagonist, and we'll consider how the city itself has incorporated and rebelled against such representations. The scope of our inquiry will stretch from the late 18th century to the present, covering a host of topics, figures, and sites: from the French Revolution to the protests of May '68, from Baudelaire to Hemingway, from the Impressionists to the Situationists. Taught in English
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum
Instructors: Braude, M. (PI)
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