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191 - 200 of 1123 results for: all courses

CLASSICS 126: The archaeology of death

Death is a universal human experience, but one that evokes a wide range of cultural and material responses. Archaeologists have used mortuary and bioarchaeological evidence to try to understand topics as diverse as paleodemography, human health and disease, social structure and inequalities, ritual, and identity and personhood. As such, the archaeology of death has become a locus for lively debates about archaeological interpretation. Furthermore, the study of human remains and mortuary contexts raises a set of complex ethical and political issues. We will explore these themes using a range of archaeological and anthropological case studies from different times and places.
Last offered: Winter 2020 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

CLASSICS 128: Europe Before the Romans: Early Complex Societies (ARCHLGY 128)

This course will provide a broad introduction to theories of change in early complex societies and polities. Over the course of the quarter, we will examine a series of hotly debated theoretical frameworks. From the beginning, you will develop a case study for your final research paper using an appropriate theoretical framework. The course will look at a series of global case studies but will focus specifically on western Europe¿s protohistoric Iron Age (c.800¿100BCE), a period of technological innovation, rich art and cultural expression, rapidly growing connectivity and trade, alongside rapid social and political change.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Mallon, K. (PI)

CLASSICS 138: The Use and Abuse of Prehistory (ANTHRO 131A, ARCHLGY 131)

To borrow Glyn Daniel¿s phrase, the ¿Idea of Prehistory,¿ invokes notions of deep time, human origins, and mysterious monuments. While the origins of prehistoric research in the 19th century were connected to the emerging sciences of geology, evolution, and archaeology, they were just as intertwined with nation-state building, colonialism, and race science. This course examines the development of prehistory through a thematic and critical lens. How have Western conceptualizations of time and writing affected the definition and study of prehistory? What are some of the colonial legacies in both research agendas and museum collections? Do new methods always provide new answers? What role has gender played in prehistoric interpretation? Drawing from case studies in the Mediterranean, the Americas, Europe, and Africa, we will explore various archaeological approaches to prehistory from the late 19th century to the present, as well as how the idea of prehistory itself has evolved, expanded, or been abandoned altogether.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI
Instructors: Duray, A. (PI)

CLASSICS 150: Majors Seminar: The Augustan Age

Required of Classics majors and minors in junior or senior year; students contemplating honors should take this course in junior year. Advanced skills course involving close reading, critical thinking, editing, and writing. In-class and take-home writing and revising exercises. Final paper topic may be on any subject related to Classics. Fulfills WIM requirement for Classics. nOut of the ashes of the Roman Republic, Augustus crafted a new, autocratic regime that survived for centuries¿a transformative moment in European history. How did Augustus establish stability after the turmoil and bloodshed of the 1st century BCE? Why did the Augustan Age produce some of the greatest literary and artistic works in European history? This course will examine the political and social revolution engineered by Augustus and explore monumental achievements such as Virgil¿s Aeneid and the Pantheon.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-SI

CLASSICS 151: Ten Things: An Archaeology of Design (ARCHLGY 151)

Connections among science, technology, society and culture by examining the design of a prehistoric hand axe, Egyptian pyramid, ancient Greek perfume jar, medieval castle, Wedgewood teapot, Edison's electric light bulb, computer mouse, Sony Walkman, supersonic aircraft, and BMW Mini. Interdisciplinary perspectives include archaeology, cultural anthropology, science studies, history and sociology of technology, cognitive science, and evolutionary psychology.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

CLASSICS 154: Sailing the Wine-Dark Sea: Maritime Archaeology of the Ancient Mediterranean (ARCHLGY 145)

Why do we care about shipwrecks? What can sunken sites and abandoned ports tell us about our past? Focusing primarily on the archaeological record of shipwrecks and harbors, along with literary evidence and contemporary theory, this course examines how and why ancient mariners ventured across the "wine-dark seas" of the Mediterranean for travel, warfare, pilgrimage, and especially commerce. We will explore interdisciplinary approaches to the development of maritime contacts and communication from the Bronze Age through the end of Roman era. At the same time, we will engage with practical techniques of maritime archaeology, which allows us to explore the material record first hand.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI

CLASSICS 165: Religions of Ancient Eurasia (ARCHLGY 109)

This course will explore archaeological evidence for the ritual and religions of Ancient Eurasia, including Greco-Roman polytheism, early Christianity, and early Buddhism. Each week, we will discuss the most significant themes, methods, and approaches that archaeologists are now using to study religious beliefs and rituals. Examples will focus on the everyday social, material, and symbolic aspects of religion. The course will also consider the role of archaeological heritage in religious conflicts today and the ethical dilemmas of archaeology in the 21st century.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

COMM 1: Introduction to Communication

Our world is being transformed by media technologies that change how we interact with one another and perceived the world around us. These changes are all rooted in communication practices, and their consequences touch on almost all aspects of life. In COMM 1 we will examine the effects of media technologies on psychological life, on industry, and on communities local and global through theorizing and demonstrations and critiques of a wide range of communication products and services.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

COMM 1B: Media, Culture, and Society (AMSTUD 1B)

The institutions and practices of mass media, including television, film, radio, and digital media, and their role in shaping culture and social life. The media's shifting relationships to politics, commerce, and identity.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

COMM 100S: Introduction to Digital Labor

Digital technologies have had a profound influence on our economy, the ways we communicate, and the ways in which we work. This course will provide a lens through which to understand digital labor and digital work today. We will explore the ideological and cultural values of Silicon Valley and their role in shaping the new business models of the Internet Age (such as crowdsourcing, the sharing economy, and humans-as-a-service). We will examine the past, present, and future of mechanisms of workplace control (from clocks to algorithmic management) and the implications of the digital turn on spatial and material dimensions of labor. Finally, we will turn our attention toward possible futures of work, given the increasing presence of automation and artificial intelligence in the workplace. By engaging with social scientific analyses and popular media, students will leave the course with a greater appreciation of worker perspectives and challenges in the digital era.
Last offered: Summer 2019 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
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