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641 - 650 of 1104 results for: all courses

HISTORY 293C: Stateless in South Asia

Taking statelessness as more than a political condition, this course reviews the myriad aspects of statelessness. Exploring a few critical moments in modern South Asia (1945-2010), this seminar thematically follows the historical construction of statelessness in some of the most conflict-ridden theatres of world politics. This course explores the following questions: Is statelessness always a result of national and nationalist exclusion? What are the ways in which statelessness has amplified the gaps in the coherent rationale of national belonging?
Last offered: Spring 2020 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

HISTORY 296E: Modern South Asia, 1500- Present

This course examines the major political, social, religious, and cultural developments within early modern, colonial, and postcolonial South Asia. Topics include religious reform, the role of women, anticolonialism, and national formation. Students will be introduced to critical writings on the emergence of modernity on the Indian subcontinent.
Last offered: Winter 2020 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

HISTORY 297F: Religion and Power in the Making of Modern South Asia (RELIGST 255, RELIGST 355)

This course examines the diverse ways that religious traditions have been involved in the brokering of power in South Asia from the late seventeenth century to the present day. We will examine the intersection of religion and power in different arenas, including historical memory, religious festivals, language politics, and violent actions. At the core of our inquiry is how religion is invoked in political contexts (and vice-versa), public displays of religiosity, and the complex dynamics of religion and the state. Among other issues, we will particularly engage with questions of religious identity, knowledge, and violence. Undergraduates must enroll in RELIGST 255 for 5 units. Graduate students must enroll RELIGST 355 for 3-5 units. HISTORY297F must be taken for 4-5 units.
Last offered: Spring 2016 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

HISTORY 297G: Rulers, Reformers, Radicals: History of India in Two Centuries

This course traces the cultural, religious, literary, and political lineages of India during the last two centuries. It investigates the conditions and impact of colonialism in the formation of the contemporary subcontinent. In doing so, the course examines the ways in which Indians changed their society, culture, and identities as they became entwined with colonial, imperial, and global forces. Over the course of the quarter, we will address the following questions: What was the nature of colonial rule in India? How did the process of colonization shape questions of gender and class, race and caste in India? In societies as diverse as India, is anticolonialism synonymous with nationalism?
Last offered: Autumn 2019 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

HISTORY 298C: Race, Gender, & Sexuality in Chinese History (ASNAMST 298, CSRE 298G, FEMGEN 298C, HISTORY 398C)

This course examines the diverse ways in which identities--particularly race, ethnicity, gender and sexuality have been understood and experienced in Chinese societies, broadly defined, from the imperial period to the present day. Topics include changes in women's lives and status, racial and ethnic categorizations, homosexuality, prostitution, masculinity, and gender-crossing.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Elmore, A. (PI)

HUMBIO 2B: Culture, Evolution, and Society

Introduction to the evolutionary study of human diversity, the origins of social complexity, and the field of demography. Topics will include hominid evolution, population dynamics and the demographic transition, the impact of disease on societies, social theory, and patterns and consequences of inequality. HUMBIO2B, with HUMBIO3B and HUMBIO 4B, satisfies the Writing in the Major (WIM) requirement for students in Human Biology. HUMBIO 2A and HUMBIO 2B are designed to be taken concurrently and exams or quizzes for both sides may include material from joint module lectures. Concurrent enrollment is strongly encouraged and is necessary for majors in order to meet declaration deadlines. Please note that Human Biology majors are typically required to take the Human Biology Core Courses for a letter grade; however in academic year 20-21 majors may count courses taken for a letter grade or for Credit (CR).
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI, WAY-SMA

HUMBIO 4B: Behavior, Health, and Development

Research and theory on human behavior, health, and life span development. How biological factors and cultural practices influence cognition, emotion, motivation, personality, and health in childhood, adolescence, and adulthood. HUMBIO 4B, with HUMBIO2B and HUMBIO 3B, satisfies the Writing in the Major (WIM) requirement for students in Human Biology. HUMBIO 4A and HUMBIO 4B are designed to be taken concurrently and exams or quizzes for both sides may include material from joint module lectures. Concurrent enrollment is strongly encouraged and is necessary for majors in order to meet declaration deadlines. Please note that Human Biology majors are typically required to take the Human Biology Core Courses for a letter grade; however in academic year 20-21 majors may count courses taken for a letter grade or for Credit (CR).
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI

HUMBIO 29G: Gender and Intersectionality in Global Health

Intersectional thinking is increasingly being applied to global health and other academic disciplines as a framework for understanding complex, and often seemingly intractable, challenges to health and well-being. This course explores how gender (e.g. male, female, trans*, non-binary, etc) identity and relationships intersect with other social categorizations, including age and reproductive status (particularly for women), race/ethnicity, socioeconomic class, immigration status, educational attainment, to create systemic advantages or disadvantages that may explain and/or could address poor health outcomes within and across global communities. More specifically, we will focus on intersectional and biological frameworks in the context of cultural gender norms, to explore possible reasons for differences in incidence and prevalence of a wide range of health disparities worldwide. We will also use these frameworks to explore options for health improvement, in terms of both prevention and care/treatment.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

HUMBIO 65: Biosocial Medicine: The Social, Psychological, and Biological Determinants of Behavior and Wellbeing (EDUC 205, SOMGEN 215)

Explores how social forces, psychological influences, and biological systems combine to affect human behavior in early childhood, in the educational experience, and throughout the life course. Examines how behaviors are linked to well-being. Uses a flipped classroom model, in which a series of lectures are available for students to view on-line before class. In-class time then focuses on case studies from published research. Students must enroll in HUMBIO 65 for a letter grade to be eligible for Ways credit.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Barr, D. (PI)

HUMBIO 79Q: Sexuality and Society

This course will explore how sexual identity, attitudes, and behaviors are shaped by the messages sent by the various agents of society such as schools, family, peers, media, and religious, medical, and political institutions. The interaction of biology, psychology, and socio-cultural factors, such as gender roles and sexual/relationship scripts will be discussed, as will the intersection of sexuality and notions of love, romance, and commitment. Critical developmental periods, such as adolescence and emerging adulthood will be examined in depth. Students will explore their own values and feelings about sexuality and come to an understanding of how their beliefs were formed. We will discuss how information about sexuality is disseminated in our society and what we can do to help ensure that such information is used in a way that promotes healthy self-conceptions, behavior, and relationships.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-Gender, WAY-SI
Instructors: Medoff, L. (PI)
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