2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020 2020-2021
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

271 - 280 of 865 results for: all courses

ENGLISH 153A: James Joyce

A close reading of Joyce's works, including Dubliners, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Ulysses, and Finnegans Wake. We will also read Stephen Hero, the abandoned draft of A Portrait, Giacomo Joyce, several of Joyce's speeches, letters and poems, and the play Exiles. We'll devote some attention to his biographies, and also watch clippings from the two film versions of Ulysses: Joseph Strick's Ulysses:(1967) and Sean Walsh's Bloom (2004). We will read some of the classics of Joyce criticism (Wilson, Levin, Lukacs), as well as later, more contemporary approaches (Jameson, Moretti, Duffy, Gibson, Wicke, Latham, Rubenstein, Walkowitz).
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II
Instructors: Majumdar, S. (PI)

ENGLISH 154J: Prep Schools, Frat Houses, and Hogwarts: The Campus in 20th & 21st Century Literature

This course examines the representation of campus life across a variety of media and genres: from Willa Cather¿s The Professor¿s House (1925) to Todd Phillips¿s Old School (2003) to Vampire Weekend¿s ¿Campus¿ (2008) and beyond. By studying the evolution of the campus over the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, we will explore how artists dealt with the school as an increasingly unavoidable part of modern experience. Why do artists rebel so vehemently against the school system? Why do schools like teaching novels that are all about how terrible schools are? What can and can¿t we learn in class?
Terms: Sum | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum
Instructors: Frank, M. (PI)

ENGLISH 160: Poetry and Poetics

Introduction to the reading of poetry, with emphasis on how the sense of poems is shaped through diction, imagery, and technical elements of verse.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II

ENGLISH 161: Narrative and Narrative Theory

An introduction to stories and storytelling--that is, to narrative. What is narrative? When is narrative fictional and when non-fictional? How is it done, word by word, sentence by sentence? Must it be in prose? Can it be in pictures? How has storytelling changed over time? Focus on various forms, genres, structures, and characteristics of narrative.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II

ENGLISH 163D: Shakespeare: The Ethical Challenge (TAPS 163D)

Was the eighteenth century right in proclaiming Shakespeare to be the greatest moral philosopher? What are the ethical challenges Shakespeare's major plays still pose for us? Can we divorce ethical decisions from the contingencies of experience? We will ask a series of normative ethical questions (to do with pleasure, power, old age, self-sacrifice, and truth telling) and attempt to answer them in relation to the dramatic situation of Shakespeare's characters on the one hand and our own cultural situation on the other. The ethical challenge of Shakespearean drama will be set against selected readings in ethical theory.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-EthicReas, WAY-A-II, WAY-ER
Instructors: Lupic, I. (PI)

ENGLISH 164: Senior Seminar

Small-class format focused on the close reading of literary texts and analysis of literary criticism. This class answers the questions: How do literary critics do what they do? What styles and gambits make criticism vibrant and powerful? Goal is to examine how one goes about writing a lucid, intelligent, and convincing piece of literary criticism based on original research.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum

ENGLISH 168: Imagining the Oceans (COMPLIT 168, FRENCH 168)

How has Western culture constructed the world's oceans since the beginning of global ocean exploration? How have imaginative visions of the ocean been shaped by marine science, technology, exploration, commerce and leisure? Authors read might include Cook, Equiano, and Steinbeck; Defoe, Verne, Stevenson, Conrad, Woolf and Hemingway; Coleridge, Baudelaire, Moore, Bishop and Walcott. Films by Painlevé and Bigelow. Seminar co-ordinated with a spring 2015 Cantor Arts Center public exhibition. Visits to Cantor; other possible field trips include Hopkins Marine Station and SF Maritime Historical Park.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

ENGLISH 172E: The Literature of the Americas (AMSTUD 142, COMPLIT 142, CSRE 142)

A wide-ranging overview of the literatures of the Americas inncomparative perspective, emphasizing continuities and crises that are common to North American, Central American, and South American literatures as well as the distinctive national and cultural elements of a diverse array of primary works. Topics include the definitions of such concepts as empire and colonialism, the encounters between worldviews of European and indigenous peoples, the emergence of creole and racially mixed populations, slavery, the New World voice, myths of America as paradise or utopia, the coming of modernism, twentieth-century avant-gardes, and distinctive modern episodes--the Harlem Renaissance, the Beats, magic realism, Noigandres--in unaccustomed conversation with each other.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II

ENGLISH 175C: Literature and Culture of the American Landscape

This course examines a wide range of American literary engagements with nature: as a determinant of national character and destiny; as a source of spiritual, sexual, and moral revitalization; as a battleground for the survival of races and ethnicities; as a molding mechanism of citizenship and gender; as the basis of a national art and culture; and as a resource for exploitation or preservation.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED
Instructors: Spingarn, A. (PI)

ENGLISH 183F: Introduction to Critical Theory

An introduction to critical theory, beginning with some of the defining moments of its history in the 20th century, to current developments in the field in the context of the contemporary global skepticism of humanistic critique, both in its institutional capacity and within the larger public sphere. Texts by Louis Althusser, Michel Foucault, Helene Cixous, Michael Hardt and Antonio Negri, Edward Said, David Lodge and others.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum
Instructors: Majumdar, S. (PI)
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
teaching presence
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints