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371 - 380 of 936 results for: all courses

HISTORY 9N: How to Start Your Own Country: Sovereignty and State-Formation in Modern History

What does it mean to start a country, or to acquire and possess sovereignty over a territory? This course will examine the historical evolution of fundamental concepts in our international system: state formation, statehood, and sovereignty. Each week will spotlight a case-study in which sovereignty and statehood have appeared greatly confused and hotly contested. These include: the UK-China lease for control of Hong Kong; the US Naval Station in Guantanamo Bay; the corporate state of the legendary British East India Company; and Disney World.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Press, S. (PI)

HISTORY 9S: Censorship & Propaganda: From Renaissance to Revolution (DLCL 106)

Information is power. From the fifteenth through eighteenth centuries, a shadowy world of illicit communication challenged church and state. We'll explore the resulting communication wars as waged through print, art, architecture, and theatre. We'll read banned, scandalous and satirical works by Niccolò Machiavelli, Martin Luther and Benjamin Franklin among many others. From the archives to the digital humanities, students will gain new tools to explore the politics and historical development of information control.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Midura, R. (PI)

HISTORY 10B: Renaissance to Revolution: Early Modern Europe

(Same as HISTORY 110B. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 110B.) Few historical settings offer a more illuminating perspective on our world today than old-regime Europe. Few cast a darker shadow. Science and the enlightened ambition to master nature and society, the emergence of statehood and its grasp for human mobility, bloodshed and coexistence in the face of religious fragmentation, as well as capitalism and the birth of modern finance: this course surveys some of the most consequential developments in European societies between the late fifteenth and the early nineteenth century.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI

HISTORY 10N: Thinking About War

This course examines classic approaches to war as an intellectual problem, looking at how a matter of such great physical violence and passions can be subjected to understanding and used in philosophy, political theory, and art. Questions to be examined include the definition of war, its causes, its moral value, the nature of its participants, its use in the self-definition of individuals and societies, its relation to political authority, warfare and gender, and the problem of civil war.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Lewis, M. (PI)

HISTORY 14N: Making the Middle Ages

Through hands-on engagement with Stanford¿s diverse collections of medieval artifacts-- from grungy coins to lavish manuscripts-- this course offers an introduction to the cultures of Europe and the Mediterranean world from 400-1400 CE. In addition, the course will explore competing contemporary understandings of the "Middle Ages" and the role of the "medieval" in shaping what it means to be "modern".
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI
Instructors: Dorin, R. (PI)

HISTORY 15D: Europe in the Middle Ages, 300-1500 (HISTORY 115D, RELIGST 115X)

This course provides an introduction to Medieval Europe from the fall of Rome to the Renaissance. While the framework of the course is chronological, we¿ll concentrate particularly on the structure of medieval society. Rural and urban life, kingship and papal government, wars and plagues provide the context for our examination of the lives of medieval people, what they believed, and how they interacted with other, both within Christendom and beyond it.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

HISTORY 16: Traders and Crusaders in the Medieval Mediterranean (HISTORY 116)

Trade and crusade were inextricably interconnected in the high Middle Ages. As merchant ships ferried knights and pilgrims across the Mediterranean, rulers borrowed heavily to finance their expeditions, while military expansion opened new economic opportunities. Course themes include the origins of the Crusading movement; the rise of Venice and other maritime powers; the pivotal roles of the Byzantine and Mongol Empires; relations between Christians, Muslims, and Jews; new military, maritime, and commercial technologies; and the modern legacy of the Crusades.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

HISTORY 20A: The Russian Empire, 1450-1800

(Same as HISTORY 120A. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 120A.) Explores rise of Russian state and expanse of empire; patterns of governance of a Eurasian empire; strategies and institutions of governance; survey of various ethnic and religious groups in empire and their varied cultures and political economies; gender and family; serfdom; Russian Orthodox religion and culture; reforms and Europeanization of 18th century.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI

HISTORY 20N: Russia in the Early Modern European Imagination

Preference to freshmen. The contrast between the early modern image of Europe as free, civilized, democratic, rational, and clean against the notion of New World Indians, Turks, and Chinese as savage. The more difficult, contemporary problem regarding E. Europe and Russia which seemed both European and exotic. Readings concerning E. Europe and Russia from the Renaissance to the Enlightenment; how they construct a positive image of Europe and conversely a negative stereotype of E. Europe. Prerequisite: PWR 1.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI, Writing 2
Instructors: Kollmann, N. (PI)

HISTORY 23N: The Soviet Union and the World: View from the Hoover Archives

This course seeks to explore the Soviet Union's influence on the world from 1917 to its end in 1991 from a variety of perspectives. Hoover Institution archival holdings will be the basic sources for the course.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Naimark, N. (PI)
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