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1051 - 1060 of 1114 results for: all courses

SLAVIC 198: Writing Between Languages: The Case of Eastern European Jewish Literature (JEWISHST 148, JEWISHST 348, SLAVIC 398)

Eastern European Jews spoke and read Hebrew, Yiddish, and their co-territorial languages (Russian, Polish, etc.). In the modern period they developed secular literatures in all of them, and their writing reflected their own multilinguality and evolving language ideologies. We focus on major literary and sociolinguistic texts. Reading and discussion in English; students should have some reading knowledge of at least one relevant language as well. ***This course must be taken for a minimum of 3 units and a letter grade to be eligible for Ways credit***
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI
Instructors: Safran, G. (PI)

SLAVIC 231: Tarkovsky

The relatively slim body of work produced by the great Russian director Andrei Tarkovsky helped redefine the possibilities of the art of cinema. Older and younger generations of directors continue to be inspired by his trademark long shot, unconventional narrative techniques, everence for landscape and nature, and by general spatio-temporal discontinuity. The course provides a systematic examination of the director's complete oeuvre (seven feature films and his works for radio and opera) along with his main theoretical treatise Sculpting in Time.
Last offered: Autumn 2019 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II

SLE 91: Structured Liberal Education

Focusing on great works of philosophy, religion, literature, painting, and film drawn largely from the Western tradition, the SLE curriculum places particular emphasis on artists and intellectuals who brought new ways of thinking and new ways of creating into the world, often overthrowing prior traditions in the process. These are the works that redefined beauty, challenged the authority of conventional wisdom, raised questions of continuing importance to us today, and¿for good or ill¿created the world we still live in. Texts may include: Homer, Sappho, Greek tragedy, Plato, Aristotle, Zhuangzi, Confucius, the Heart Sutra, Hebrew Bible, New Testament, and the Aeneid.
Terms: Aut | Units: 8 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:IHUM-1, THINK, WAY-A-II, Writing SLE

SLE 92: Structured Liberal Education

Focusing on great works of philosophy, religion, literature, painting, and film drawn largely from the Western tradition, the SLE curriculum places particular emphasis on artists and intellectuals who brought new ways of thinking and new ways of creating into the world, often overthrowing prior traditions in the process. These are the works that redefined beauty, challenged the authority of conventional wisdom, raised questions of continuing importance to us today, and¿for good or ill¿created the world we still live in. Texts may include: Augustine, the Qur'an, Dante, Rumi, Machiavelli, Montaigne, Shakespeare, Cervantes, Las Casas, Descartes, Locke, Mill, Schleiermacher, and Flaubert.
Terms: Win | Units: 8 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:IHUM-2, THINK, WAY-A-II, WAY-ER, Writing SLE

SOC 4: The Sociology of Music (AFRICAAM 4, CSRE 4)

This course examines music¿its production, its consumption, and it contested role in society¿from a distinctly sociological lens. Why do we prefer certain songs, artists, and musical genres over others? How do we ¿use¿ music to signal group membership and create social categories like class, race, ethnicity, and gender? How does music perpetuate, but also challenge, broader inequalities? Why do some songs become hits? What effects are technology and digital media having on the ways we experience and think about music? Course readings and lectures will explore the various answers to these questions by introducing students to key sociological concepts and ideas. Class time will be spent moving between core theories, listening sessions, discussion of current musical events, and an interrogation of students¿ own musical experiences. Students will undertake a number of short research and writing assignments that call on them to make sociological sense of music in their own lives, in the lives of others, and in society at large.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

SPANLANG 102: Composition and Writing Workshop

Individual development of the ability to write in Spanish. Emphasis is on style and diction, and on preparing and writing essays on literary topics. Non-Spanish majors or minors may choose topics more closely related to their studies for projects. . Prerequisite: two years of college Spanish or equivalent.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II
Instructors: Won, H. (PI)

SPANLANG 102SL: Composition and Writing Workshop

SPANLANG 102SL. Equivalent to Spanlang 102, integrating service learning with course material. Assignments will be modified for students enrolled under 102SL to focus on principles and practice of community-engaged learning. Students and native Spanish-speaking Stanford workers exchange oral histories and create digital stories with testimonials, advice, or remembrances that workers wish to share. Cardinal Course (certified by Haas Center). In 2016-2017, Spring Quarter only. Prerequisite: SPANLANG 13C, SPANLANG 13R, SPANLANG 13SL, or SPANLANG 23B
Last offered: Spring 2020 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

STS 1: The Public Life of Science and Technology (CSRE 1T)

The course focuses on key social, cultural, and values issues raised by contemporary scientific and technological developments. The STS interdisciplinary lens helps students develop and apply skills in three areas: (a) Historical analysis of contemporary global affairs (e.g., spread of technologies; responses to climate change); (b) Bioethical reasoning around health issues (e.g., disease management; privacy rights); and (c) The sociological study of knowledge (e.g., intellectual property, science publishing). A discussion section is required. Discussion sections meet once per week immediately after lecture. International time zone students are encouraged to fill out the following Google Form: https://tinyurl.com/STS1-Timezone
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

STS 200L: Critique of Technology

Informed citizens living in today'¬ôs world, and especially in Silicon Valley, should be able to formulate their own articulate positions about the role of technology in culture. The course gives students the tools to do so. Against the trend towards the thoughtless celebration of all things technological, we will engage in critique in the two senses of the term: as careful study of the cultural implications of technology and as balanced, argumentative criticism. Can technology make life more meaningful, society more fair, people smarter, and the world smaller? We will pay special attention to the insights that literature, and other arts, can offer for reframing digital culture. Selections by Latin American fiction writers (Cortázar, Zambra), philosophers and thinkers (Heidegger and Beller), as well as recent popular works of social commentary, such as You are not a Gadget, The Shallows, 24/7, and Present Shock. Taught in English.
Last offered: Winter 2017 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

SYMSYS 168A: A.I.-Activism-Art (ARTHIST 168A, CSRE 106A, ENGLISH 106A)

Lecture/studio course exploring arts and humanities scholarship and practice engaging with, and generated by, emerging emerging and exponential technologies. Our course will explore intersections of art and artificial intelligence with an emphasis on social impact and racial justice. Open to all undergraduates.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II
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