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371 - 380 of 1084 results for: all courses

DLCL 293: Literary Translation (ENGLISH 293)

An overview of translation theories and practices over time. The aesthetic, ethical, and political questions raised by the act and art of translation and how these pertain to the translator's tasks. Discussion of particular translation challenges and the decision processes taken to address these issues. Coursework includes assigned theoretical readings, comparative translations, and the undertaking of an individual translation project.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE

EDUC 116N: Howard Zinn and the Quest for Historical Truth (HISTORY 116N)

With more than two million copies in print, Howard Zinn's A People's History is a cultural icon. We will use Zinn's book to probe how we determine what was true in the past. A People's History will be our point of departure, but our journey will visit a variety of historical trouble spots: debates about whether the US was founded as a Christian nation, Holocaust denial, and the "Birther" controversy of President Obama.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II
Instructors: Wineburg, S. (PI)

ENGLISH 5A: WISE: Unfinished Novels

Few species of writing are more exquisitely uncomfortable than a novel that is not (and never will be) finished. An author dies, or loses interest, or flouts convention: whatever the cause, unfinished novels demand an especially dynamic relationship between reader and text, precipitating either wild flights of imagination or scrupulous detective work, if not both at once. In the nineteenth century, a period obsessed with all things comprehensive and complete, such fragmentariness would have appeared still more challenging, even subversive. Closely reading works by Jane Austen, Edgar Allan Poe, and Charles Dickens, along with select critical interpretations, this course will invite participants to ask: what do unfinished novels reveal to us that finished ones cannot? What peculiar insights do they give us into the processes and pressures of literary production? And what exactly is our role in consuming them?nNote: This Writing-Intensive Seminar in English (WISE) course fulfills WIM for English majors. Non-majors are welcome, space permitting. Enrollment is by permission (contact vbeebe@stanford.edu). For more information go to https://english.stanford.edu/writing-intensive-seminars-english-wise.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II
Instructors: Redmond, M. (PI)

ENGLISH 5B: WISE: Mental Health and Literature, Mid-century to Present

Is there something wrong with us, or with our world? Rising rates of clinical depression and other conditions have rendered mental health a pressing cultural concern, especially for young adults, leading institutions of higher education to expand resources to support student needs. But we have not always thought about mental health the ways we do today. In this course we read landmark literary texts from midcentury to present that both reflect and shape cultural constructions of mental health. From Toni Morrison's The Bluest Eye (1970) to Elizabeth Wurtzel's Prozac Nation (1994)to Ottessa Moshfegh's My Year of Rest and Relaxation (2018), we examine how literature destabilizes would-be binaries between mental health and mental illness. How do intersectional identity factors such as gender, race, and class inform whose mental illness is deemed deserving of treatment and whose is instead criminalized? Honing our critical writing skills by learning to employ the tools of cultural criticism more »
Is there something wrong with us, or with our world? Rising rates of clinical depression and other conditions have rendered mental health a pressing cultural concern, especially for young adults, leading institutions of higher education to expand resources to support student needs. But we have not always thought about mental health the ways we do today. In this course we read landmark literary texts from midcentury to present that both reflect and shape cultural constructions of mental health. From Toni Morrison's The Bluest Eye (1970) to Elizabeth Wurtzel's Prozac Nation (1994)to Ottessa Moshfegh's My Year of Rest and Relaxation (2018), we examine how literature destabilizes would-be binaries between mental health and mental illness. How do intersectional identity factors such as gender, race, and class inform whose mental illness is deemed deserving of treatment and whose is instead criminalized? Honing our critical writing skills by learning to employ the tools of cultural criticism, feminist theory, and critical race studies, we also engage selections from Doris Lessing, Anne Sexton, Sylvia Plath, Ralph Ellison, Richard Wright, Esmé Weijun Wang, and others. Traversing short stories, essays, drama, poetry, memoir, and novels, this timely multi-genre course equips us to historically contextualize and meaningfully respond to the current mental health crisis.nNote: This Writing-Intensive Seminar in English (WISE) course fulfills WIM for English majors. Non-majors are welcome, space permitting. Enrollment is by permission (contact vbeebe@stanford.edu). For more information go to https://english.stanford.edu/writing-intensive-seminars-english-wise.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Repeatable 2 times (up to 10 units total)
Instructors: Mukamal, A. (PI)

ENGLISH 5C: WISE: Revelation and Apocalypse: Literature at the End of the World 1300-2000

Apocalyptic thinking never goes out of fashion, nor does literature that deals with the end times. This course explores two major categories of apocalyptic thinking-- largely defined by religious and medical discourses--and the connection between the two. From Revelation, the last book of the New Testament, to early modern reckonings inspired by fire and plague, to Romantic-era sci-fi by Mary Shelley, to Station Eleven, a 2014 novel which takes place after an apocalyptic flu pandemic, we will read both millenarians and millennials, considering different visions of the end of the world, and what may come after. We'll also ask, what are the stakes--what historical concerns and cultural obsessions are revealed, after all--in these varied prophetic imaginings?nNote: This Writing-Intensive Seminar in English (WISE) course fulfills WIM for English majors. Non-majors are welcome, space permitting. Enrollment is by permission (contact vbeebe@stanford.edu). For more information go to https://english.stanford.edu/writing-intensive-seminars-english-wise.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Repeatable 2 times (up to 10 units total)

ENGLISH 5D: WISE: Bad Reading: Pleasure and Politics in Literary Value

As students of literature, we aspire to be good readers of the texts we encounter. But to see ourselves as good readers is implicitly(perhaps even complicitly)to set ourselves against another form of literary consumption: bad reading, and, by association, bad readers. Yet what makes reading "bad" or "good"? And who decides? The more we look, the less self-evident or definitive the distinction becomes,our footing precipitously dropping away into questions about our own reading practices and how society values them. The precarious label "bad reading" comes into even sharper relief when we consider that the term has long been associated not just with certain modes of reading, but also with certain classes of readers and certain kinds of books, from gory gothic thrillers and racy romances to sci-fi and comics. In this course, we will trace the definitions and stakes of bad reading from the nineteenth century to the present day, through sources ranging from Jane Austen and Virginia Woolf to more »
As students of literature, we aspire to be good readers of the texts we encounter. But to see ourselves as good readers is implicitly(perhaps even complicitly)to set ourselves against another form of literary consumption: bad reading, and, by association, bad readers. Yet what makes reading "bad" or "good"? And who decides? The more we look, the less self-evident or definitive the distinction becomes,our footing precipitously dropping away into questions about our own reading practices and how society values them. The precarious label "bad reading" comes into even sharper relief when we consider that the term has long been associated not just with certain modes of reading, but also with certain classes of readers and certain kinds of books, from gory gothic thrillers and racy romances to sci-fi and comics. In this course, we will trace the definitions and stakes of bad reading from the nineteenth century to the present day, through sources ranging from Jane Austen and Virginia Woolf to contemporary think-pieces on young adult literature and race in publishing. Along the way, we will aim both to discover whether bad reading is really so bad after all, and to understand how ideologies of gender, class, and race have shaped our conceptions of literary value.nNote: This Writing-Intensive Seminar in English (WISE) course fulfills WIM for English majors. Non-majors are welcome, space permitting. Enrollment is by permission (contact vbeebe@stanford.edu). For more information go to https://english.stanford.edu/writing-intensive-seminars-english-wise.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Repeatable 2 times (up to 10 units total)
Instructors: Jordan, J. (PI)

ENGLISH 9CA: American Road Trip

From Whitman to Kerouac, Alec Soth to Georgia O'Keeffe, the lure of travel has inspired many American artists to pack up their bags and hit the open road. In this Creative Expressions course we will be exploring the art and literature of the great American road trip, including prose, poetry, films, and photography. We will be reading and writing in a variety of genres, workshopping our own stories, and considering the ways in which our personal journeys have come to inform and define our lives. The course includes a number of campus-wide field trips, and an end-of-quarter road trip down the California coast. NOTE: Students must attend the first class meeting to retain their roster spot.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE

ENGLISH 9CI: Inspired By Science: A Writing Workshop

How can your interest in science and the environment be enriched by a regular creative practice? How do you begin to write a poem or essay about the wonders of the natural world or the nuances of climate change? What are the tools and strategies available to creative writers, and how can these techniques be used to communicate complex concepts and research to wide-audiences? We begin to answer these questions by drawing inspiration from the rich tradition of scientists who write and writers who integrate science. Emphasizing writing process over finished product, students maintain journals throughout the quarter, responding to daily prompts that encourage both practice and play. Through open-ended and exploratory writing, along with specific exercises to learn the writer¿s craft students develop a sense of their own style and voice. Note: First priority to undergrads. Students must attend the first class meeting to retain their roster spot.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE

ENGLISH 9CP: Poetry Off the Page

With recent blockbuster films like Patterson and major prizes being awarded to artists like Bob Dylan and Kendrick Lamar, the borders of what constitutes traditional literature are shifting. In this Creative Writing course we will be looking at literature `off the page,¿ in songwriting, spoken word, multi-media, and visual art. We will be workshopping our own creative projects and exploring the boundaries of contemporary literature. Artists we¿ll be looking at include Iron and Wine, Lil Wayne, Allen Ginsberg, Beyonce, David Lynch, Patti Smith, Mark Strand, Anne Carson, Danez Smith, Bon Iver, and Lou Reed.nNOTE: Students must attend the first class meeting to retain their roster spot.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE

ENGLISH 11B: Introduction to English II: American Literature and Culture to 1855 (AMSTUD 150)

(Formerly English 23/123). A survey of early American writings, including sermons, poetry, captivity and slave narratives, essays, autobiography, and fiction, from the colonial era to the eve of the Civil War.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II
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