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21 - 30 of 60 results for: ANTHRO

ANTHRO 95: Research in Anthropology

Independent research conducted under faculty supervision, normally taken junior or senior year in pursuit of a senior paper or an honors project. May be repeated for credit.
| Repeatable for credit

ANTHRO 95B: Directed Study in Honors and Senior Papers

Taken in the final quarter before graduation. Independent study and work on senior paper for students admitted to the program. Prerequisite: consent of program adviser and instructor.

ANTHRO 96: Directed Individual Study

Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
| Repeatable for credit

ANTHRO 97: Internship in Anthropology

Opportunity for students to pursue their specialization in an institutional setting such as a laboratory, clinic, research institute, or government agency. May be repeated for credit. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center).
| Repeatable for credit

ANTHRO 122A: Race and Culture in Mexico and Central America (ANTHRO 222A)

This course addresses the role of racial ideologies in the historical configuration of multiple hierarchies of inequality that determine the place of everyone in society in Mexico and Central America. Based on readings from the humanities and social sciences, we will discuss the cultural and racial politics of authoritarianism and indigenous insurgency, emphasizing narratives of laziness and vagrancy that have been central to the discipline of labor that shapes local processes of regressive modernization and nation building. We will analyze the hegemony of dictatorship as political necessity, the relationship between local racisms and global Whiteness, and the emergence of new local and transnational contestations to the multiple hierarchies that determine the place of everyone in society.
Instructors: Gonzalez, J. (PI)

ANTHRO 122C: Research in Maya Hieroglyphic Writing (ANTHRO 222C)

Workshop. Current issues in the decipherment and analysis of Maya hieroglyphic writing and literacy.
| Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Fox, J. (PI)

ANTHRO 133B: Covering Islam: On What We Learn to See, Think and Hear about Islam & Muslims (AFRICAST 133B, CSRE 133B)

In this course, students will think critically about how knowledge about Islam, Muslims, and Muslim Societies is produced and circulated. As a class, we will consider why and how certain kinds of ideas about Islam and Muslims become representative (i.e., authoritative discourse) while others ideas do not. This is an interdisciplinary class; course material will draw on readings from anthropology, literary criticism, history, sociology and media and cultural studies. We will also be engaging with other kinds of material, including news articles, editorials, documentaries, and films.
Instructors: Ghani, A. (PI)

ANTHRO 136: The Anthropology of Global Supply Chains (ANTHRO 236)

This upper-division undergraduate seminar focuses on recent studies by anthropologists and scholars in related disciplines on global supply chains and consumption practices.The goal of the course is to assess concepts and methods for integrating a cultural analysis of transnational production with a cultural analysis of transnational consumption. We will review ethnographic studies of the production and consumption of commodities linked by transnational and global networks. The class will thennpursue collaborative research on the global production, distribution, and consumption of a selected commodity. Prerequisite: junior or senior standing and previous coursework in cultural anthropology or permission of instructor.

ANTHRO 138B: Urban Africa (AFRICAST 138B, URBANST 139)

This course explores the production of urban space and the social, cultural, and political significance of cities in sub-Saharan Africa. Topics include: architecture and the built environment; urban planning and colonial public health; migration and rural-urban dynamics; youth, politics, and popular culture; violence, policing, and the privatization of public space; (in)formality in housing, transportation, and employment; class, gender, and mobility in the public sphere; urban citizenship and `right to the city¿ movements; gentrification, tourism, and the commodification of poverty; and efforts to (re)theorize postcolonial African cities. Readings are drawn from anthropology, history, urban studies, and geography. Discussion will situate struggles over urban forms and the contours of everyday life within broader trends in the political economy of the region from the late colonial period to the present.
Instructors: West, A. (PI)
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