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ITALIAN 237: Michelangelo: Gateway to Early Modern Italy (ARTHIST 218A, ARTHIST 418A, ITALIAN 337)

Revered as one of the greatest artists in history, Michelangelo Buonarroti's extraordinarily long and prodigious existence (1475-1564) spanned the Renaissance and the Reformation in Italy. The celebrity artist left behind not only sculptures, paintings, drawings, and architectural designs, but also an abundantly rich and heterogeneous collection of artifacts, including direct and indirect correspondence (approximately 1400 letters), an eclectic assortment of personal notes, documents and contracts, and 302 poems and 41 poetic fragments. This course will explore the life and production of Michelangelo in relation to those of his contemporaries. Using the biography of the artist as a thread, this interdisciplinary course will draw on a range of critical methodologies and approaches to investigate the civilization and culture of Italy in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries. Course themes will follow key tensions that defined the period and that found expression in Michelangelo: physical-spiritual, classical-Christian, tradition-innovation, individual-collective.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II
Instructors: Prodan, S. (PI)

ITALIC 91: Immersion in the Arts: Living in Culture, Creating

Creating, is the first part of ITALIC, a year-long course that explores the ways people make and encounter a wide range of artworks, including music and performance, the visual arts, literature, film and other media. In ITALIC 91 we ask: How do artists innovate? What roles can earlier artworks play in new creations? How do audiences create? In addressing these questions, we will read texts by Viktor Shklovsky, Maurice Merleau-Ponty, and Susan Sontag, among others. We will attend Tosca at the San Francisco Opera, the Susan Meiselas exhibition at SFMoMA, as well as street art and the home of the conceptual artist David Ireland in the Mission District of San Francisco. We will also have a class visit by the St. Lawrence String Quartet and attend a performance by the musician Nitin Sawhney with the dancer/choreographers WangRamirez on campus. In order to make talking about art a part of daily life, students taking ITALIC live together in Burbank and eat lunch with their professors after class on Tuesdays and Thursdays. The course enhances its academic endeavors with art-making opportunities in section and a two-week practicum with Dan Klein devoted to the art of improv.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: THINK, WAY-A-II

ITALIC 92: Immersion in the Arts: Living in Culture, Interpreting

ITALIC 92, Interpreting. Why do artworks affect us and how do we make sense of them? What makes it difficult to describe works of art and how can we do this well? How do our individual experiences influence our responses and interpretations? ITALIC will address these questions in lecture and see art on and off campus, including performances of Gloria the new play by Branden Jacobs-Jenkins and the ballet Rite of Spring choreographed by Yang Liping.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: THINK, WAY-A-II

JAPAN 21: Humanities Core: Love and Betrayal in Asia (CHINA 21, HUMCORE 21, KOREA 21)

Why are lovers in storybooks East and West always star-crossed? Why do love and death seem to go together? For every Romeo and Juliet, there are dozens of doomed lovers in the Asian literary repertoires, from Genji's string of embittered mistresses, to the Butterfly lovers in early modern China, to the voices of desire in Koryo love songs, to the devoted adolescent cousins in Dream of the Red Chamber, to the media stars of Korean romantic drama, now wildly popular throughout Asia. In this course, we explore how the love story has evolved over centuries of East Asian history, asking along the way what we can learn about Chinese, Japanese, and Korean views of family and community, gender and sexuality, truth and deception, trust and betrayal, ritual and emotion, and freedom and solidarity from canonical and non-canonical works in East Asian literatures. N.B. This is the second of three courses in the East Asian track. These courses offer an unparalleled opportunity to study East Asian history and culture, past and present. Take all three to experience a year-long intellectual community dedicated to exploring how ideas have shaped our world and future.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II

JAPAN 21Q: Humanities Core: Love and Betrayal in Asia (CHINA 21Q, HUMCORE 21Q, KOREA 21Q)

Why are lovers in storybooks East and West always star-crossed? Why do love and death seem to go together? For every Romeo and Juliet, there are dozens of doomed lovers in the Asian literary repertoires, from Genji's string of embittered mistresses, to the Butterfly lovers in early modern China, to the voices of desire in Koryo love songs, to the devoted adolescent cousins in Dream of the Red Chamber, to the media stars of Korean romantic drama, now wildly popular throughout Asia. In this course, we explore how the love story has evolved over centuries of East Asian history, asking along the way what we can learn about Chinese, Japanese, and Korean views of family and community, gender and sexuality, truth and deception, trust and betrayal, ritual and emotion, and freedom and solidarity from canonical and non-canonical works in East Asian literatures. N.B. This is the second of three courses in the East Asian track. These courses offer an unparalleled opportunity to study East Asian history and culture, past and present. Take all three to experience a year-long intellectual community dedicated to exploring how ideas have shaped our world and future.
Last offered: Winter 2019 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II

JAPAN 24: Humanities Core: How to be Modern in East Asia (CHINA 24, HUMCORE 24, KOREA 24)

This course considers the political, economic, social, cultural, and artistic effects of the introduction of new technologies and media to modern Japan. Our exploration will encompass printed books and images, language reform, communication technology, serialized fiction and commercial journalism, propaganda and censorship, cinema, comics, animation and television. Through examination of these topics we will investigate a wide range of issues including nationality, ethnic identity, class, cultural identification, gender, sexuality, literacy, imperialism, consumerism, materialism, and globalism, to name just a few. Throughout the course, we will be attentive not only to the ways that new technology and media are represented in cultural materials but also how they are materialized in these products through the acts of adaptation, translation, transliteration, and remediation. No knowledge of Japanese is necessary. All materials are in English. This class fulfills the Writing & Rhetoric 2 requirement. Prerequisite: PWR 1.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, Writing 2
Instructors: Reichert, J. (PI)

JAPAN 52: Global Humanities: The Grand Millennium, 800-1800 (DLCL 52, HISTORY 206D, HUMCORE 52)

How should we live? This course explores ethical pathways in European, Islamic, and East Asian traditions: mysticism and rationality, passion and duty, this and other worldly, ambition and peace of mind. They all seem to be pairs of opposites, but as we'll see, some important historical figures managed to follow two or more of them at once. We will read works by successful thinkers, travelers, poets, lovers, and bureaucrats written between 800 and 1900 C.E. We will ask ourselves whether we agree with their choices and judgments about what is a life well lived.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ER

JAPAN 60: Asian Arts and Cultures (ARTHIST 2)

An exploration of the visual arts of East and South Asia from ancient to modern times, in their social, religious, literary and political contexts. Analysis of major monuments of painting, sculpture and architecture will be organized around themes that include ritual and funerary arts, Buddhist art and architecture across Asia, landscape and narrative painting, culture and authority in court arts, and urban arts in the early modern world.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II
Instructors: Vinograd, R. (PI)

JAPAN 110: Romance, Desire, and Sexuality in Modern Japanese Literature (FEMGEN 110J, FEMGEN 210J, JAPAN 210)

This class is structured around three motifs: love suicide (as a romantic ideal), female desire, and same-sex sexuality. Over the course of the quarter we will look at how these motifs are treated in the art and entertainment from three different moments of Japanese history: the Edo period (1615-1868), the modern period (1920-65), and the contemporary period (1965-present). We will start by focusing on the most traditional representations of these topics. Subsequently, we will consider how later artists and entertainers revisited the conventional treatments of these motifs, informing them with new meanings and social significance. We will devote particular attention to how this material comments upon issues of gender, sexuality, and human relationships in the context of Japan. Informing our perspective will be feminist and queer theories of reading and interpretation.
Last offered: Autumn 2016 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

JAPAN 118: Humanities Core: Everybody Eats: The Language, Culture, and Ethics of Food in East Asia (CHINA 118, HUMCORE 22, KOREA 118)

Many of us have grown up eating "Asian" at home, with friends, on special occasions, or even without full awareness that Asian is what we were eating. This course situates the three major culinary traditions of East Asia--China, Japan, and Korea--in the histories and civilizations of the region, using food as an introduction to their rich repertoires of literature, art, language, philosophy, religion, and culture. It also situates these seemingly timeless gastronomies within local and global flows, social change, and ethical frameworks. Specifically, we will explore the traditional elements of Korean court food, and the transformation of this cuisine as a consequence of the Korean War and South Korea¿s subsequent globalizing economy; the intersection of traditional Japanese food with past and contemporary identities; and the evolution of Chinese cuisine that accompanies shifting attitudes about the environment, health, and well-being. Questions we will ask ourselves during the quarter include, what is "Asian" about Asian cuisine? How has the language of food changed? Is eating, and talking about eating, a gendered experience? How have changing views of the self and community shifted the conversation around the ethics and ecology of meat consumption?
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, Writing 2
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