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701 - 710 of 1089 results for: all courses

ILAC 263: Visions of the Andes

Themes like "people," "revolt," "community," "utopia" and "landscape" are central to 20th century Andean narrative and its accompanying critical apparatus. The course reviews major works of Andean literature to reconsider the aesthetic and intellectual legacy of modernity and modernization in the region. We discuss changes in recent literature and film. Special attention is payed to post-conflict Peru and Evo Morales' Bolivia.
Last offered: Autumn 2018 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II

ILAC 272: New Brazilian Cinema

This course studies cinema from Brazil with a focus on films from the last decade. We will consider how to effectively talk and write about film, particularly according to Brazil's specific historical and cultural context and from a perspective of social realism. Numerous readings and discussions will bolster our viewings of fiction films and documentaries. Directors include Kleber Mendonça Filho, Anna Muylaert, Gabriel Mascaro, Karim Aïnouz, Aly Muritiba, and Petra Costa. Taught in English; films shown with English subtitles.
Last offered: Winter 2020 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II

ILAC 277: Senior Seminar: Horror, Gothic, and Fantasy in Spanish

In this course we delve into stories and film where realism is put to the test. From vampires in Havana to mysterious children in Buenos Aires, we work with a constellation of writers who shape minor genres into masterpieces. We'll map the ways in which these narratives work with form (against literary or cinematic realism), affect (eliciting emotional responses), and adaptation (as translations or dislocations of genre, gender, geography, time, and modes of production). The selection includes Bombal, Quiroga, Borges, Cortázar, Lispector, Ocampo, Enríquez, Schweblin, Sandoval, and Del Toro, among others.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED
Instructors: Briceno, X. (PI)

ILAC 278A: Senior Seminar: The Iberian Pastoral

What does pastoral literature, with its lovesick shepherds, acts of self-immolation, and aquatic nymphs, have to teach us? For early modern Portugal and Spain, it formed a surprisingly indispensable foundation for the social. From the earliest lyric traditions to the rise of the modern novel, the pastoral is everywhere. Through a close analysis and discussion of early modern texts in Spanish and Portuguese, as well as some theoretical/philosophical texts in English, we will explore the place of the pastoral in early modern Iberia and reckon with its impact on our own sense of the past. Authors include: Bernardim Ribeiro, Francisco de Sá de Miranda, Garcilaso de la Vega, Joan Boscà, Jorge de Montemayor, Luís de Camões, Diogo Bernardes, Luis de Góngora, and Violante do Céu.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II
Instructors: Barletta, V. (PI)

ITALIAN 75N: Narrative Medicine and Near-Death Experiences (FRENCH 75N)

Even if many of us don't fully believe in an afterlife, we remain fascinated by visions of it. This course focuses on Near-Death Experiences and the stories around them, investigating them from the many perspectives pertinent to the growing field of narrative medicine: medical, neurological, cognitive, psychological, sociological, literary, and filmic. The goal is not to understand whether the stories are veridical but what they do for us, as individuals, and as a culture, and in particular how they seek to reshape the patient-doctor relationship. Materials will span the 20th century and come into the present. Taught in English.
Last offered: Autumn 2017 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

ITALIAN 101: Italy: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly

Renowned for its rich cultural tradition, Italy is also one of the most problematic nations in Europe. This course explores the contradictions at the heart of Italy by examining how art and literature provide a unique perspective onto modern Italian history. We will focus on key phenomena that contribute both positively and negatively to the complex "spirit" of Italy, such as the presence of the past, political realism and idealism, revolution, corruption, decadence, war, immigration, and crises of all kinds. Through the study of historical and literary texts, films, and news media, the course seeks to understand Italy's current place in Europe and its future trajectory by looking to its past as a point of comparison. Taught in English.
Last offered: Spring 2018 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

ITALIAN 115: Virtual Italy (CLASSICS 115, ENGLISH 115, HISTORY 238C)

Classical Italy attracted thousands of travelers throughout the 1700s. Referring to their journey as the "Grand Tour," travelers pursued intellectual passions, promoted careers, and satisfied wanderlust, all while collecting antiquities to fill museums and estates back home. What can computational approaches tell us about who traveled, where and why? We will read travel accounts; experiment with parsing; and visualize historical data. Final projects to form credited contributions to the Grand Tour Project, a cutting-edge digital platform. No prior programming experience necessary.
Terms: Win, Sum | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

ITALIAN 127: Inventing Italian Literature: Dante, Boccaccio, Petrarca

This course examines the origins of Italian literature in the late Middle Ages. We will read selections from Dante's Vita Nuova and Inferno; Petrarca's Canzoniere; and Boccaccio's Decameron. Taught in Italian. Recommended: ITALLANG 22A or equivalent level of proficiency.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II
Instructors: Mollo, V. (PI)

ITALIAN 128: The Italian Renaissance and the Path to Modernity

Are humans free and self-determining agents possessed of infinite potential or limited beings subject to the vagaries of fortune? What is the relationship between love and beauty? Is it better for a leader to inspire love or fear? These are the kind of questions Renaissance thinkers asked and we will pursue in our study of the literature, art, and history of Italy from the fifteenth through the eighteenth centuries. In this course, you will become acquainted with major writers, thinkers, and artists, and key ideas, innovations, and movements. Examining masterpieces of literature (poetry and prose), art (painting, drawing and sculpture), theater and music, including works of the High Renaissance, we will explore such topics as love, power, faith, reason, and contingency in human affairs. With the themes of discovery, invention and adaption as our guide, we will reflect on perennial tensions between imitation and inspiration, tradition and innovation, and conformity and transgression in Renaissance and early modern Italy. Taught in Italian. Recommended: ITALLANG 22A or equivalent (2 years of Italian). This course fulfills the Writing in the Major (WIM) requirement.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II
Instructors: Prodan, S. (PI)

ITALIAN 129: Introduction to Modern Italian Literature and Culture

What historical, political, and social dynamics shaped the "Belpaese" over the course of the last two centuries? How do we make sense of this Italy - at once monolithic and multitudinous, ancient and newborn? What does being Italian mean today, and where does such belonging find its roots? This course considers such questions through the study of literary, filmic, and musical works from the period of Italian unification in the mid-1800s to the turn of the 21st century, with an ear open to the interplay between the ¿national¿ and the deeply personal. The course is an introduction to modern Italian literature and culture and a continuation of the study of the Italian language. All class discussion, reading, and writing will be in Italian. Please do not hesitate to contact the instructor should you have doubts about your language level.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II
Instructors: Massucco, M. (PI)
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