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ILAC 241: Fiction Workshop in Spanish

Spanish and Spanish American short stories approached through narrative theory and craft. Assignments are creative in nature and focus on the formal elements of fiction (e.g. character and plot development, point of view, creating a scene, etc.). Students will write, workshop, and revise an original short story throughout the term. No previous experience with creative writing is required. Readings may include works by Ayala, Bolaño, Borges, Clarín, Cortázar, García Márquez, Piglia, Rodoreda, and others. Enrollment limited.
Last offered: Winter 2018 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE

ILAC 243: Latin American Aesthetics

As the branch of philosophy that deals with the principles of beauty and artistic taste, aesthetics is, purportedly, universal. The course interrogates its conspicuous omission of Latin American theorization and cultural production. Three thematic axes are vanguardia, colonialidad, and populismo; a central concern is aesthetic responses to precariousness. Argentine, Brazilian, Chilean, Colombian, and Cuban essayism and visual arts from the mid 20th century to the present, notably origenismo, neo-baroque, and indigenismo. In collaboration with a cognate course at UC Berkeley. Taught in Spanish.nNOTE: This course must be taken for a minimum of 3 units and a letter grade to be eligible for WAYS credit.
Last offered: Autumn 2017 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

ILAC 249: Women and Wolves in Film and Literature (ILAC 355)

This course deconstructs the foundational narrative that corrals women into capitalist patriarchy, together with animals. Paying close attention to interspecies bonds between canidae and homo sapiens, we study novels and films where women, wolves and dogs resist the male gaze. Ever heard of Little Red Riding Hood? What if there could be a liberating alliance between her and the wolf? Taught in Spanish.
Last offered: Spring 2021 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II

ILAC 254: Crónicas: Soccer, Pop Icons, Shipwrecks, and Populism

In this course, Mexican scholar and writer Juan Villoro analyzes Latin American works that sit halfway between fiction and non-fiction ("crónicas"). A survey on the shifting Latin-American cultural and political landscape, and its narrative representations. Authors include Nobel-laureate Gabriel García Márquez, Elena Ponitowska, and her groundbreaking account of social movements in Mexico. Martín Camparrós (biographer of Boca Juniors),queer activist auteur Pedro Lemebel (Chile), contemporary Argentine journalist Leila Guerriero, and selections from Tomás Eloy Martínez's epochal Santa Evita.
Last offered: Spring 2020 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II

ILAC 263: Visions of the Andes

Themes like "people," "revolt," "community," "utopia" and "landscape" are central to 20th century Andean narrative and its accompanying critical apparatus. The course reviews major works of Andean literature to reconsider the aesthetic and intellectual legacy of modernity and modernization in the region. We discuss changes in recent literature and film. Special attention is payed to post-conflict Peru and Evo Morales' Bolivia.
Last offered: Autumn 2018 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II

ILAC 272: New Brazilian Cinema

This course studies cinema from Brazil with a focus on films from the last decade. We will consider how to effectively talk and write about film, particularly according to Brazil's specific historical and cultural context and from a perspective of social realism. Numerous readings and discussions will bolster our viewings of fiction films and documentaries. Directors include Kleber Mendonça Filho, Anna Muylaert, Gabriel Mascaro, Karim Aïnouz, Aly Muritiba, and Petra Costa. Taught in English; films shown with English subtitles.
Last offered: Winter 2020 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II

ILAC 277: Senior Seminar: Cultures of Salsa

Salsa is the soundscape of 20th century Latin America. In this course we ask how is it possible that salsa stands for Latin American music? How can we understand its origin and its musical expansion? We study how salsa voices transformation and self-exploration of different places and moments in all of Latin America and the US, and we also analyze how it travels across the world. We discuss musical examples in relation to colonialism, globalization, migration, nationalism, gender and ethnicity, as well as connections between salsa and reggaeton.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED
Instructors: Briceno, X. (PI)

ILAC 278A: Senior Seminar: 4 Boom Novels

By the time the phenomenon known as "nueva novela" coalesced into the so-called "Latin American literary Boom," the vibrant political experiments of the 1960s and early 1970s were either cut short or losing steam. Four greats emerged (García Márquez, Vargas Llosa, Fuentes, and Cortázar), leaving behind a trail of competing historiographies that sought to account for the explosive reinvigoration of the novel form that took in place in those years in the Spanish language. In this course we will read four representative novels with great care, paying equal attention to the ideological context as to the intrinsic literary features at play. We will hone in on the craft of interpretation while examining different takes on boom fiction. Topics will include: the role of peninsular brokerage, particularly of Seix Barral; the less canonized works from women, Brazilian authors; the "Padilla Affair" revisited; macondismo; novela total, and others. Secondary sources from Carpentier and Donoso through Shaw and Faris, to Levinson and beyond. In Spanish.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II

ITALIAN 75N: Narrative Medicine and Near-Death Experiences (FRENCH 75N)

Even if many of us don't fully believe in an afterlife, we remain fascinated by visions of it. This course focuses on Near-Death Experiences and the stories around them, investigating them from the many perspectives pertinent to the growing field of narrative medicine: medical, neurological, cognitive, psychological, sociological, literary, and filmic. The goal is not to understand whether the stories are veridical but what they do for us, as individuals, and as a culture, and in particular how they seek to reshape the patient-doctor relationship. Materials will span the 20th century and come into the present. Taught in English.
Last offered: Autumn 2017 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

ITALIAN 101: Italy: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly

Renowned for its rich cultural tradition, Italy is also one of the most problematic nations in Europe. This course explores the contradictions at the heart of Italy by examining how art and literature provide a unique perspective onto modern Italian history. We will focus on key phenomena that contribute both positively and negatively to the complex "spirit" of Italy, such as the presence of the past, political realism and idealism, revolution, corruption, decadence, war, immigration, and crises of all kinds. Through the study of historical and literary texts, films, and news media, the course seeks to understand Italy's current place in Europe and its future trajectory by looking to its past as a point of comparison. Taught in English.
Last offered: Spring 2018 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED
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