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JAPANLIT 181: Japanese Pragmatics (JAPANLIT 281)

The choice of linguistic expressions and our understanding of what is said involve multiple sociocultural, cognitive and discourse factors. Can such pragmatic factors and processes be considered universal to all languages, or are there variations among languages? The course will investigate an array of phenomena observed in Japanese. Through readings and projects, students will deepen their knowledge of Japanese and consider theoretical implications. Prerequisites: one year of Japanese and a course in linguistics, or two years of Japanese, or consent of instructor.
Last offered: Winter 2015 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

JEWISHST 4N: A World History of Genocide (HISTORY 4N)

Reviews the history of genocide from ancient times until the present. Defines genocide, both in legal and historical terms, and investigates its causes, consequences, and global dimensions. Issues of prevention, punishment, and interdiction. Main periods of concern are the ancient world, Spanish colonial conquest; early modern Asia; settler genocides in America, Australia, and Africa; the Armenian genocide and the Holocaust; genocide in communist societies; and late 20th century genocide.
Last offered: Winter 2015 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

JEWISHST 38A: Germany and the World Wars (HISTORY 38A)

(Same as HISTORY 138A. Majors and others taking 5 units, enroll in 138A.) Germany's tumultuous history from the Second Empire through the end of the Cold War. International conflict, social upheaval, and state transformation during Bismarck's wars of unification, World War One, the Weimar Republic, the rise of Nazism, World War Two, the Holocaust, the division of communist East and capitalist West Germany, and the fall of the Iron Curtain.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Sheffer, E. (PI)

JEWISHST 84: Zionism and the State of Israel (CSRE 84, HISTORY 84, REES 84)

(Same as HISTORY 184. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 184.) Hotly contested still, this course will open up the movement's ideas, practices, achievements and crises in such a way as to allow students to hear the fullest range of voices - Jewish, Arab, religious, secular, etc. It will track the movement from its appearance in the late nineteenth century until the establishment of State of Israel in 1948, and beyond.
Last offered: Spring 2015 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

JEWISHST 85B: Jews in the Contemporary World: Faith and Ethnicity, Visibility and Vulnerability (CSRE 85B, HISTORY 85B, REES 85B)

(Same as HISTORY 185B. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 185B.) This course explores the full expanse of Jewish life today and in the recent past. The inner workings of religious faith, the content of Jewish identify shorn of belief, the interplay between Jewish powerlessness and influence, the myth and reality of Jewish genius, the continued pertinence of antisemitism, the rhythms of Jewish economic life ¿ all these will be examined in weekly lectures, classroom discussion, and with the use of a widely diverse range of readings, films, and other material. Explored in depth will the ideas and practices of Zionism, the content of contemporary secularism and religious Orthodoxy, the impact Holocaust, the continued crisis facing Israel and the Palestinians. Who is to be considered Jewish, in any event, especially since so many of the best known (Spinoza, Freud, Marx) have had little if anything to do with Jewish life with their relationships to it indifferent, even hostile?
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

JEWISHST 86S: Zionism Considered: Jewish Thinkers and the Quest for a Jewish Home (HISTORY 86S)

This course examines how Jews have approached Zionism from the mid-nineteenth century until the present day. Focusing on understanding the major divisions within Zionism, a particular emphasis will be on leaders of the various factions, exploring why they believed a Jewish home to be necessary and how such a home was envisioned. Readings will include propaganda, literature, and images, and assignments include short responses, presentations, and a research paper. Priority given to history majors and minors.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Meyers, J. (PI)

JEWISHST 138A: Germany and the World Wars (HISTORY 138A)

(Same as HISTORY 38A. Majors and others taking 5 units, enroll in 138A.) Germany's tumultuous history from the Second Empire through the end of the Cold War. International conflict, social upheaval, and state transformation during Bismarck's wars of unification, World War One, the Weimar Republic, the rise of Nazism, World War Two, the Holocaust, the division of communist East and capitalist West Germany, and the fall of the Iron Curtain.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI
Instructors: Sheffer, E. (PI)

JEWISHST 183: The Holocaust (HISTORY 137, HISTORY 337, JEWISHST 383)

The emergence of modern racism and radical anti-Semitism. The Nazi rise to power and the Jews. Anti-Semitic legislation in the 30s. WW II and the beginning of mass killings in the East. Deportations and ghettos. The mass extermination of European Jewry.
Last offered: Winter 2015 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

JEWISHST 184: Zionism and the State of Israel (CSRE 184C, HISTORY 184, REES 184)

(Same as History 84.) Hotly contested still, this course will open up the movement's ideas, practices, achievements and crises in such a way as to allow students to hear the fullest range of voices - Jewish, Arab, religious, secular, etc. It will track the movement from its appearance in the late nineteenth century until the establishment of State of Israel in 1948, and beyond.
Last offered: Spring 2015 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

JEWISHST 185B: Jews in the Contemporary World: Faith and Ethnicity, Vulnerability and Visibility (CSRE 185B, HISTORY 185B, HISTORY 385C, REES 185B)

This course explores the full expanse of Jewish life today and in the recent past. The inner workings of religious faith, the content of Jewish identify shorn of belief, the interplay between Jewish powerlessness and influence, the myth and reality of Jewish genius, the continued pertinence of antisemitism, the rhythms of Jewish economic life ¿ all these will be examined in weekly lectures, classroom discussion, and with the use of a widely diverse range of readings, films, and other material. Explored in depth will the ideas and practices of Zionism, the content of contemporary secularism and religious Orthodoxy, the impact Holocaust, the continued crisis facing Israel and the Palestinians. Who is to be considered Jewish, in any event, especially since so many of the best known (Spinoza, Freud, Marx) have had little if anything to do with Jewish life with their relationships to it indifferent, even hostile?
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI
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