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291 - 300 of 1215 results for: all courses

CSRE 156: The Changing American City (SOC 156A, SOC 256A, URBANST 156A)

After decades of decline, U.S. cities today are undergoing major transformations. Young professionals are flocking to cities instead of fleeing to the suburbs. Massive increases in immigration have transformed the racial and ethnic diversity of cities and their neighborhoods. Public housing projects that once defined the inner city are disappearing, and crime rates have fallen dramatically. Do these changes signal the end of residential segregation and urban inequality? Who do these changes benefit? This course will explore these issues and strategies to address them through readings and discussion, analyzing a changing neighborhood in a major city in the Bay Area in groups (which will include at least one site visit), and studying a changing neighborhood or city of their choice for their final project. The course does not have pre-requisites.
Last offered: Autumn 2019 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

CSRE 162: The Politics of Sex: Work, Family, and Citizenship in Modern American Women's History (AMSTUD 161, FEMGEN 161, HISTORY 61, HISTORY 161)

This course explores the transition from Victorian to modern American womanhood by asking how Native, European, African, Mexican, and Asian American women navigated the changing sexual, economic, and political landscapes of the twentieth century. Through secondary readings, primary sources, films, music, and literature we explore the opportunities and boundaries on groups of women in the context of historical events that included immigration, urbanization, wartime, depression, the Cold War, as well as recurrent feminist and conservative political movements.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

CSRE 162A: Spirituality and Nonviolent Urban and Social Transformation (RELIGST 162X, URBANST 126)

A life of engagement in social transformation is often built on a foundation of spiritual and religious commitments. Case studies of nonviolent social change agents including Rosa Parks in the civil rights movement, César Chávez in the labor movement, and WIlliam Sloane Coffin in the peace movement; the religious and spiritual underpinnings of their commitments. Theory and principles of nonviolence. Films and readings. Service learning component includes placements in organizations engaged in social transformation. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center).
Last offered: Winter 2021 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

CSRE 168: RACE, NATURE, AND THE CITY (AFRICAAM 168, EARTHSYS 169, SOC 168A, URBANST 168)

This course provides an introduction to the study of race and place within urban political ecology (UPE). Geographer Natasha Cornea defines UPE as a 'conceptual approach that understands urbanization to be a political, economic, social, and ecological process, one that often results in highly uneven and inequitable landscapes' in and beyond cities. The primary focus will be cities in the Americas, but we will draw on insights from scholars studying the mutually constitutive nature of race and place in other regions. In line with critical theories that frame intersectional experiences of race, the course readings also take into account class, gender, sexuality, and nation.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

CSRE 174: History of South Africa (AFRICAAM 147, HISTORY 147)

(Same as HISTORY 47. HISTORY 147 is for 5 units; HISTORY 47 is for 3 units) Introduction, focusing particularly on the modern era. Topics include: precolonial African societies; European colonization; the impact of the mineral revolution; the evolution of African and Afrikaner nationalism; the rise and fall of the apartheid state; the politics of post-apartheid transformation; and the AIDS crisis.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

CSRE 176B: The Social Life of Neighborhoods (AFRICAAM 76B, AMSTUD 276, SOC 176, SOC 276, URBANST 179)

How do neighborhoods come to be? How and why do they change? What is the role of power, money, race, immigration, segregation, culture, government, and other forces? In this course, students will interrogate these questions using literatures from sociology, geography, and political science, along with archival, observational, interview, and cartographic (GIS) methods. Students will work in small groups to create content (e.g., images, audio, and video) for a self-guided ¿neighborhood tour,¿ which will be added to a mobile app and/or website.
Last offered: Spring 2021 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

CSRE 178P: The Science and Practice of Effective Advocacy (PUBLPOL 178, URBANST 178)

How can purposeful collective action change government policy, business practices and cultural norms? This course will teach students about the components of successful change campaigns and help develop the practical skills to carry out such efforts. The concepts taught will be relevant to both issue advocacy and electoral campaigns, and be evidence-based, drawing on lessons from social psychology, political science, communications, community organizing and social movements. The course will meet twice-a-week for 90 minutes, and class time will combine engaged learning exercises, discussions and lectures. There will be a midterm and final. Students will be able to take the course for 3 or 5 units. Students who take the course for 5 units will participate in an advocacy project with an outside organization during the quarter, attend a related section meeting and write reflections. For 5 unit students, the section meeting is on Tuesdays, from 3:00 to 4:00 p.m.
Last offered: Spring 2020 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

CSRE 179A: Crime and Punishment in America (AFRICAAM 179A, AMSTUD 179A, SOC 179A, SOC 279A)

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the way crime has been defined and punished in the United States. Recent social movements such as the Movement for Black Lives have drawn attention to the problem of mass incarceration and officer-involved shootings of people of color. These movements have underscored the centrality of the criminal justice system in defining citizenship, race, and democracy in America. How did our country get here? This course provides a social scientific perspective on America¿s past and present approach to crime and punishment. Readings and discussions focus on racism in policing, court processing, and incarceration; the social construction of crime and violence; punishment among the privileged; the collateral consequences of punishment in poor communities of color; and normative debates about social justice, racial justice, and reforming the criminal justice system. Students will learn to gather their own knowledge and contribute to normative debates through a field report assignment and an op-ed writing assignment.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

CSRE 180A: Foundations of Social Research (SOC 180A, SOC 280A)

Formulating a research question, developing hypotheses, probability and non-probability sampling, developing valid and reliable measures, qualitative and quantitative data, choosing research design and data collection methods, challenges of making causal inference, and criteria for evaluating the quality of social research. Emphasis is on how social research is done, rather than application of different methods. Limited enrollment; preference to Sociology and Urban Studies majors, and Sociology coterms.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI
Instructors: Kiviat, B. (PI)

CSRE 185B: Jews in the Contemporary World:  The American Jewish Present & Past in Popular Culture,  Film, & TV (HISTORY 185B, JEWISHST 185B, REES 185B, SLAVIC 183)

( HISTORY 185B is 5 units; HISTORY 85B IS 3 units.) Who are American Jews as depicted in popular media -- film, television, etc. -- since the Second World War? How are their religion, politics, mores, and practices represented and what ways, if at all, do such portraits reflect historical trends among Jews and society in general? What can be learned from film or tv about Jewish identity, notions of Jewish power and powerlessness, communal cohesiveness and assimilation, sexuality and the wages of intermarriage or race?
Last offered: Winter 2021 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI
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