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  COVID-19 Scheduling Updates!
Due to recent announcements about Autumn Quarter (see the President's update), please expect ongoing changes to the class schedule.

211 - 220 of 1086 results for: all courses

COMM 177B: Big Local Journalism: a project-based class (COMM 277B)

This class will tackle data-driven journalism, in collaboration with other academic and journalistic partners.nnThe class is centered around one or more projects rooted in local data-driven journalism but with potential for regional or national journalistic stories and impact. Students work in interdisciplinary teams to negotiate for public records and data, analyze data and report out stories. Some of the work may be published by news organizations or may be used to advance data journalism projects focused on public accountability. Students will gain valuable knowledge and skills in how to negotiate for public records, how to critically analyze data for journalistic purpose and build out reporting and writing skills. Students with a background in journalism (especially data journalism), statistics, computer science, law, or public policy are encouraged to participate. Enrollment is limited. Prerequisite: consent of instructor . May be repeated for credit. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Repeatable 2 times (up to 10 units total)
Instructors: Phillips, C. (PI)

COMM 177Y: Specialized Writing and Reporting: Foreign Correspondence (COMM 277Y)

(Graduate students register for COMM 277Y.) Study how being a foreign correspondent has evolved and blend new communication tools with clear narrative to tell stories from abroad in a way that engages a diversifying American audience in the digital age. Prerequisite: COMM 104W, COMM 279, or consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, WAY-SI
Instructors: Zacharia, J. (PI)

COMM 184: Race and Media (COMM 284)

This course explores the co-construction of media practices and racial identity in the US. We will ask how media have shaped how we think about race. And we will explore the often surprising ways ideas about race have shaped media practices and technologies in turn. The course will draw on contemporary debates as well as historical examples and will cover themes such as representation and visual culture, media industries and audience practices, and racial bias in digital technology.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI
Instructors: Li, X. (PI)

COMM 186W: Media, Technology, and the Body (COMM 286)

This course considers major themes in the cultural analysis of the body in relation to media technologies. How do media and information technologies shape our understanding of the body and concepts of bodily difference such as race, gender, and disability? We will explore both classic theories and recent scholarship to examine how technologies mediate the body and bodily practices in various domains, from entertainment to engineering, politics to product design.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Li, X. (PI)

COMM 230A: Digital Civil Society

Digital technologies are changing the way members of the civil society come together to change the world. The 'civil society' includes social movements, grassroots activism, philanthropists, unions, nonprofits, NGOs, charities, and cooperatives, among others. Their mission is to effect important social and political transformations to bring about what they see as a better world. But their work and strategies are subject to significant changes in the digital era. The course will analyze the opportunities and challenges digital technologies present for associational life, free expression, privacy, and collective action. We will cover a wide range of key themes, including digital rights advocacy and racial justice, community-owned networks and de-colonial design, activist resistance to surveillance technologies, algorithmic bias, Black Twitter, and digital misinformation, micro-targeting and voter suppression. The course is global in scope (we will read authors and study cases from America, Europe, Asia, and Africa), taught by a multidisciplinary team (history, communication, computational social science, education), and is committed to a syllabus centering on the scholarship, expertise, and voices of marginalized communities.No prerequisite.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

COMM 230B: Digital Civil Society

Digital technologies have fundamentally changed how people come together to make change in the world, a sphere of action commonly called 'civil society'. How did this happen, what's being done about it, and what does it mean for democratic governance and collective action in the future? This course analyzes the opportunities and challenges technology presents to associational life, free expression, individual privacy, and collective action. Year-long seminar sequence for advanced undergraduates or master's students. Each quarter may be taken independently. Winter Quarter focuses on the 2000s and considers the emergence of social media platforms, the rise of mobile connectivity, institutional shifts in journalism, and major developments in intellectual property, state surveillance, and digital activism.
Last offered: Winter 2020 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

COMM 230C: Digital Civil Society (CSRE 230C)

Digital technologies have fundamentally changed how people come together to make change in the world, a sphere of action commonly called 'civil society'. How did this happen, what's being done about it, and what does it mean for democratic governance and collective action in the future? This course analyzes the opportunities and challenges technology presents to associational life, free expression, individual privacy, and collective action. Year-long seminar sequence for advanced undergraduates or master's students. Each quarter may be taken independently. Spring focuses on emergent trends related to democracy and associational life, from the 2010s and into the future. Topics include the Arab Spring, global political propaganda, 'born digital' organizations, the development of electronic governments, and biotechnologies.
Last offered: Spring 2020 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

COMPLIT 100: CAPITALS: How Cities Shape Cultures, States, and People (DLCL 100, FRENCH 175, GERMAN 175, HISTORY 206E, ILAC 175, ITALIAN 175, URBANST 153)

This course takes students on a trip to major capital cities, at different moments in time: Renaissance Florence, Golden Age Madrid, Colonial Mexico City, Enlightenment and Romantic Paris, Existential and Revolutionary St. Petersburg, Roaring Berlin, Modernist Vienna, and bustling Buenos Aires. While exploring each place in a particular historical moment, we will also consider the relations between culture, power, and social life. How does the cultural life of a country intersect with the political activity of a capital? How do large cities shape our everyday experience, our aesthetic preferences, and our sense of history? Why do some cities become cultural capitals? Primary materials for this course will consist of literary, visual, sociological, and historical documents (in translation); authors we will read include Boccaccio, Dante, Sor Juana, Montesquieu, Baudelaire, Gogol, Irmgard Keun, Freud, and Borges. Note: To be eligible for WAYS credit, you must take the course for a Letter Grade.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI
Instructors: Surwillo, L. (PI)

COMPLIT 104A: Voice, Dissent, Resistance: Antiracist and Antifascist Discourse and Action (COMPLIT 304)

The rise of right-wing movements in the United States and in Europe signal a resurgence of nativist and ethno-nationalist politics that rely heavily on racism to advance fascist politics. This course will explore these phenomena both in terms of their historical development and their present-day appearances. The goal will be to understand how those involved in anti-racist and anti-fascist struggles have invented, created, and practiced discourses and actions that attempt to resist racism and fascism, and to evaluate their merits and weaknesses. Historical, philosophic, journalistic, and creative writings will be the basis of study. This is an experimental course driven by the urgency of recent political events. Students should have open minds and be willing to help shape the course.
Last offered: Autumn 2019 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

COMPLIT 155A: The Mafia in Society, Film, and Fiction (ITALIAN 155)

The mafia has become a global problem through its infiltration of international business, and its model of organized crime has spread all over the world from its origins in Sicily. At the same time, film and fiction remain fascinated by a romantic, heroic vision of the mafia. Compares both Italian and American fantasies of the Mafia to its history and impact on Italian and global culture. Taught in English.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI
Instructors: Wittman, L. (PI)
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