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671 - 680 of 1111 results for: all courses

HUMBIO 163: The Opioid Epidemic: Using Neuroscience to Inform Policy and Law

The opioid epidemic has become a national problem, killing 115 people per day in the United States, and contributing to the first decrease in life expectancy in this country for decades.This is an upper division undergraduate class that aims to help students understand the science of opiates, how opioid prescribing and availability led us to be in this place, and how that information might be used to create effective policy to reverse it. Students will engage didactic work and interactive discussions to stimulate critical thinking at the interface between psychology, psychiatry, addiction medicine, neuroscience, communication, law, and society. They will develop the knowledge-base and framework to critically evaluate the science behind opioid addiction and how to apply this knowledge to address the addiction epidemic. This highly interactive seminar aims to engage the students in critical thinking didactics, activities and discussions that shape their understanding of the complexity in more »
The opioid epidemic has become a national problem, killing 115 people per day in the United States, and contributing to the first decrease in life expectancy in this country for decades.This is an upper division undergraduate class that aims to help students understand the science of opiates, how opioid prescribing and availability led us to be in this place, and how that information might be used to create effective policy to reverse it. Students will engage didactic work and interactive discussions to stimulate critical thinking at the interface between psychology, psychiatry, addiction medicine, neuroscience, communication, law, and society. They will develop the knowledge-base and framework to critically evaluate the science behind opioid addiction and how to apply this knowledge to address the addiction epidemic. This highly interactive seminar aims to engage the students in critical thinking didactics, activities and discussions that shape their understanding of the complexity inherent to the issues surrounding addiction and increase the student's ability to more critically assimilate and interrogate information. Preference will be given to upperclassmen, especially in the HumBio program. Attendance at first class is mandatory. Enrollment limited to 20 by application only. Applications will be accepted on Sunday, February 28th at midnight, consistent with the Spring Quarter enrollment. Applications will be due on Friday, March 5th at 5:00PM. Applications will be considered in the order received. Apply here: https://app.smartsheet.com/b/form/615264add6dc475da6da583f9a41a4b0. Prerequisites: Human Biology Core or PSYC 83 or consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

HUMBIO 171: The Death Penalty: Human Biology, Law, and Policy

Combines academic study with student participation in forensic research and case investigation, including DNA evidence, psychological and physiological development, mental and physical disabilities, and witness interviews. The philosophy, structure, and application of capital punishment in the U.S. Goal is to examine and challenge the issues involved in the death penalty from the perspective of involvement in a real case. Course not taught from a preconceived belief or political or philosophical agenda except to involve students in an intellectual challenge of policy and philosophy. Upper division course with preference given to upperclassmen.
Last offered: Winter 2017 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

HUMBIO 172B: Children, Youth, and the Law (PUBLPOL 172)

How the legal rights of children and adolescents in America are defined, protected, and enforced through the legal process within the context of their developmental needs and competing societal interests. Topics: origins and definitions of children's rights; adoption; custody; the juvenile justice system; education; freedom of speech; and sex. The class is interactive, using hypotheticals for discussion and analysis. A and B alternate; students may take one or both. Upper division course with preference given to upperclassmen.
Last offered: Winter 2020 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

HUMBIO 176A: Medical Anthropology (ANTHRO 82, ANTHRO 282)

Emphasis is on how health, illness, and healing are understood, experienced, and constructed in social, cultural, and historical contexts. Topics: biopower and body politics, gender and reproductive technologies, illness experiences, medical diversity and social suffering, and the interface between medicine and science.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

HUMRTS 101: Cross-Disciplinary Perspectives on Human Rights Theory and Practice

In this survey human rights course, students will learn about the principal historical and philosophical bases for the modern concept of human rights, as well as the international legal frameworks meant to protect and promote these rights. Class sessions will include a mix of seminar discussions and guest lectures by distinguished Stanford faculty from departments across the university as well as practitioners from a variety of professional fields. The course seeks to illuminate for how the distinct methodologies, assumptions, and vocabulary of particular disciplinary communities affect the way scholars and practitioners trained in these fields approach, understand, and employ human rights concepts. This course fulfills the gateway course requirement for the minor in Human Rights.nnnPlease note that whether you enroll in the morning section or the afternoon section of the course, this class is scheduled to meet for 80 minutes at a time, twice a week (M/W). The morning section runs 10:30-11:50am. The afternoon section runs 3:00-4:20pm.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER, WAY-SI
Instructors: Van Tuyl, P. (PI)

HUMRTS 106: Human Rights in Comparative and Historical Perspective (CLASSICS 116, ETHICSOC 106)

This course examines core human rights issues and concepts from a comparative and historical perspective. In the beginning part of the course we will focus on current debates about the universality of human rights norms, considering the foundation of the international human rights regime and claims that it is a product of western colonialism, imperialism, or hegemony. We will then discuss a series of issues where the debates about universality are particularly acute: gender inequality and discrimination, sexual violence, child marriage and forced marriage more generally, and other related topics. We will also consider the way in which issues of gender-based violence arise in the context of internal and international conflicts.
Last offered: Spring 2019 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER, WAY-SI

HUMRTS 109: Slavery, human trafficking, and the moral order: ancient and modern (CLASSICS 118, CLASSICS 218)

Slavery and trafficking in persons in the Greco-Roman world were legal and ubiquitous; today slavery is illegal in most states and regarded as a grave violation of human rights and as a crime against humanity under international law. In recent trends, human trafficking has been re-conceptualized as a form of "modern day slavery. " Despite more than a century since the success of the abolition movement, slavery and trafficking continue in the 21st century on a global scale. The only book for the course is: Peter Garnsey, Ideas of Slavery from Aristotle to Augustine, Cambridge University Press
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

HUMRTS 112: Human Trafficking: Historical, Legal, and Medical Perspectives (CSRE 105C, FEMGEN 105C, HISTORY 105C, INTNLREL 105C)

(Same as HISTORY 5C. History majors and others taking 5 units, enroll in 105C.) Interdisciplinary approach to understanding the extent and complexity of the global phenomenon of human trafficking, especially for forced prostitution, labor exploitation, and organ trade, focusing on human rights violations and remedies. Provides a historical context for the development and spread of human trafficking. Analyzes the current international and domestic legal and policy frameworks to combat trafficking and evaluates their practical implementation. Examines the medical, psychological, and public health issues involved. Uses problem-based learning. Required weekly 50-min. discussion section, time TBD. Students interested in service learning should consult with the instructor and will enroll in an additional course.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

ILAC 132: Drug Wars: from Pablo Escobar to the Mara Salvatrucha to Iguala Mass Student Kidnapping

This course will study the ways in which Latin American Narcos are represented in feature films, documentaries, essays, and novels. We will choose two regions and times: Pablo Escobar's Colombia (1949-1993) and current Mexico (1990-2015), including the mass students kidnappings in Iguala, México, 2014. Films: Sins of my Father (Entel, 2009); Pablo's Hippos (Lawrence Elman, 2010); True Story of Killing Pablo, David Keane (2002), Sumas y restas (Víctor Gaviria, 2003); La vida loca (Poveda, 2009), Sin nombre (Cary Fukunaga, 2009), El velador (Almada, 2011); La jaula de oro (Quemada-Díez, 2013); La bestia (Pedro Ultreras, 2010); Cartel Land (Heineman, 2015); The Missing 43 (Vice, 2015). Books: Alejandra Inzunza, José Luis Pardo, Pablo Ferri: Narco America, de los Andes a Manhattan (2015); Sergio González Rodríguez: El hombre sin cabeza (2010); Rafael Ramírez Heredia: La Mara (2004).
Last offered: Winter 2020 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

ILAC 175: CAPITALS: How Cities Shape Cultures, States, and People (COMPLIT 100, DLCL 100, FRENCH 175, GERMAN 175, HISTORY 206E, ITALIAN 175, URBANST 153)

This course takes students on a trip to major capital cities, at different moments in time: Renaissance Florence, Golden Age Madrid, Colonial Mexico City, Enlightenment and Romantic Paris, Existential and Revolutionary St. Petersburg, Roaring Berlin, Modernist Vienna, and bustling Buenos Aires. While exploring each place in a particular historical moment, we will also consider the relations between culture, power, and social life. How does the cultural life of a country intersect with the political activity of a capital? How do large cities shape our everyday experience, our aesthetic preferences, and our sense of history? Why do some cities become cultural capitals? Primary materials for this course will consist of literary, visual, sociological, and historical documents (in translation); authors we will read include Boccaccio, Dante, Sor Juana, Montesquieu, Baudelaire, Gogol, Irmgard Keun, Freud, and Borges. Note: To be eligible for WAYS credit, you must take the course for a Letter Grade.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI
Instructors: Surwillo, L. (PI)
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