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CLASSICS 164: Roman Gladiators (ARCHLGY 165)

In modern America, gladiators are powerful representatives of ancient Rome (Spartacus, Gladiator). In the Roman world, gladiators were mostly slaves and reviled, barred from certain positions in society and doomed to short and dangerous lives. A first goal of this course is to analyze Roman society not from the top down, from the perspective of politicians, generals and the literary elite, but from the bottom up, from the perspective of gladiators and the ordinary people in the stands. A second goal is to learn how work with very different kinds of evidence: bone injuries, ancient weapons, gladiator burials, laws, graffiti written by gladiators or their fans, visual images of gladiatorial combats, and the intricate architecture and social control of the amphitheater. A final goal is to think critically about modern ideas of Roman ¿bloodthirst.¿ Are these ideas justified, given the ancient evidence?
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

CLASSICS 165: Religions of Ancient Eurasia (ARCHLGY 109)

This course will explore archaeological evidence for the ritual and religions of Ancient Eurasia, including Greco-Roman polytheism, early Christianity, and early Buddhism. Each week, we will discuss the most significant themes, methods, and approaches that archaeologists are now using to study religious beliefs and rituals. Examples will focus on the everyday social, material, and symbolic aspects of religion. The course will also consider the role of archaeological heritage in religious conflicts today and the ethical dilemmas of archaeology in the 21st century.
Last offered: Spring 2019 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

COMM 1B: Media, Culture, and Society (AMSTUD 1B)

The institutions and practices of mass media, including television, film, radio, and digital media, and their role in shaping culture and social life. The media's shifting relationships to politics, commerce, and identity.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI
Instructors: Turner, F. (PI)

COMM 100S: Introduction to Digital Labor

Digital technologies have had a profound influence on our economy, the ways we communicate, and the ways in which we work. This course will provide a lens through which to understand digital labor and digital work today. We will explore the ideological and cultural values of Silicon Valley and their role in shaping the new business models of the Internet Age (such as crowdsourcing, the sharing economy, and humans-as-a-service). We will examine the past, present, and future of mechanisms of workplace control (from clocks to algorithmic management) and the implications of the digital turn on spatial and material dimensions of labor. Finally, we will turn our attention toward possible futures of work, given the increasing presence of automation and artificial intelligence in the workplace. By engaging with social scientific analyses and popular media, students will leave the course with a greater appreciation of worker perspectives and challenges in the digital era.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Ali, S. (PI)

COMM 102S: Technology and Inequality

This course will provide an introduction to information inequalities arising in the digital era. By working through various literature in media such as media economics and digital divide, we will explore how content personalization via the algorithms could reproduce or amplify long-standing inequalities in race, class, and gender. This course also functions as an introduction to entry-level data science whereby you develop basic programming skills (Python) and apply them to your group project. By the end of the course, you will have developed skills to think critically of technology¿s impact on our democracy and to present evidence-based analysis of your research interests. No prior programming experience is necessary to take this class.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Lee, J. (PI)

COMM 108: Media Processes and Effects (COMM 208)

(Graduate students register for COMM 208.) The process of communication theory construction including a survey of social science paradigms and major theories of communication. Recommended: 1 or PSYCH 1.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI
Instructors: Harari, G. (PI)

COMM 120W: The Rise of Digital Culture (AMSTUD 120, COMM 220)

From Snapchat to artificial intelligence, digital systems are reshaping our jobs, our democracies, our love lives, and even what it means to be human. But where did these media come from? And what kind of culture are they creating? To answer these questions, this course explores the entwined development of digital technologies and post-industrial ways of living and working from the Cold War to the present. Topics will include the historical origins of digital media, cultural contexts of their deployment and use, and the influence of digital media on conceptions of self, community, and state. Priority to juniors, seniors, and graduate students.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI
Instructors: Turner, F. (PI)

COMM 121S: Audience 2.0: Changing Practices and Experiences of Audiencing in the Digital Age

This is an introductory media/cultural studies course that looks at the changing contours of audiencehood in the digital age. Although the term ¿audience¿ seems outmoded in the era of social media, instead of abandoning the term altogether, this course is aimed to expand its definitional boundary and infuse it with new meanings. Starting with a brief historical survey of major theoretical and methodological approaches to studying audiences of popular media and journalism, this course mainly concentrates on approaches associated with cultural studies traditions and their applications to understanding media-audience relationships. The course situates audiencehood in a global and transnational context.nnnTopics will include active audience and their roles in mass media age and digital era; debates about audience¿s power and resistance; fandom and participatory culture; the multifaceted roles of audiences (e.g. fans, activists, ¿produsers¿, laborers etc.); consumerism and commodification; alternative and minority media; emerging journalism practices and corresponding visions of audiences in the digital age; meanings of participation; journalism, affects/emotions and networked publics; the ideal of conversation and filter bubble debates etc.
Last offered: Summer 2019 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

COMM 124: Lies, Trust, and Tech (COMM 224)

Deception is one of the most significant and pervasive social phenomena of our age. Lies range from the trivial to the very serious, including deception between friends and family, in the workplace, and in security and intelligence contexts. At the same time, information and communication technologies have pervaded almost all aspects of human communication, from everyday technologies that support interpersonal interactions to, such as email and instant messaging, to more sophisticated systems that support organization-level interactions. Given the prevalence of both deception and communication technology in our personal and professional lives, an important set of questions have recently emerged about how humans adapt their deceptive practices to new communication and information technologies, including how communication technology affects the practice of lying and the detection of deception, and whether technology can be used to identify deception.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Hancock, J. (PI)

COMM 125: Perspectives on American Journalism (AMSTUD 125, COMM 225)

An examination of American journalism, focusing on how news is produced, distributed, and financially supported. Emphasis on current media controversies and puzzles, and on designing innovations in discovering and telling stories. (Graduate students register for COMM 225.)
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI
Instructors: Hamilton, J. (PI)
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