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151 - 160 of 1087 results for: all courses

ARTHIST 188B: From Shanghai Modern to Global Contemporary: Frontiers of Modern Chinese Art (ARTHIST 388B)

Chinese artistic developments in an era of revolution and modernization, from Shanghai Modern and New National Painting though the politicized art of the Cultural Revolution and post-Mao era re-entry into international arenas.
Last offered: Winter 2017 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

ARTHIST 189C: Global Currents: Early Modern Art Enterprises, Economies, and Imaginaries (ARTHIST 389C)

Episodes of global artistic exchange from the 16th to 19th centuries involving commodities (porcelains and textiles), technologies (printmaking, perspective, and cartography), and imaginaries (Chinoiserie, East Asian Occidenteries, Orientalism, Japonisme). The role of enterprises, institutions, and power relations in artistic economies, from the Portuguese Empire, Jesuit mission networks and East India Companies to imperialist systems.
Last offered: Spring 2015 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

ARTHIST 191: African American Art (AFRICAAM 191B, CSRE 191)

This course explores major art and political movements, such as the Harlem Renaissance, the Black Arts Movement, and #BlackLivesMatter, that have informed and were inspired by African American artists. Students will read pivotal texts written by Black artists, historians, philosophers and activists; consider how artists have contended with issues of identity, race, gender, and sexuality; and learn about galleries, collections, and organizations founded to support the field. Attendance on the first day of class is a requirement for enrollment.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED
Instructors: Salseda, R. (PI)

ARTHIST 192B: Art of the African Diaspora

This introduction to the art of the African Diaspora uses art and visual culture as means to explore the history and impact of the global spread of African peoples from slavery until the present day. Lectures and discussions will examine a range of artistic practices from street festivals and Afro-Caribbean religious traditions to the work of studio-trained artists of international repute.
Last offered: Winter 2015 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II

ARTHIST 194: U.S. Latinx Art (CHILATST 195, CSRE 195)

This course surveys art made by Latinas/os/xs who have lived and worked in the United States since the 1700s, including Chicanos, Nuyoricans, and other Black, Brown, and Indigenous artists. While exploring the diversity of Latinx art, students will consider artists' relationships to identity, race, ethnicity, gender, and sexuality. Students will also study how artists have responded to and challenged discrimination, institutional exclusion, and national debates through their work. Attendance on the first day of class is a requirement for enrollment.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED
Instructors: Salseda, R. (PI)

ARTHIST 203: Artists, Athletes, Courtesans and Crooks (CLASSICS 163)

The seminar examines a range of topics devoted to the makers of Greek art and artifacts, the men and women who used them in life and the afterlife, and the miscreants - from Lord Elgin to contemporary tomb-looters and dealers - whose deeds have damaged, deracinated and desecrated temples, sculptures and grave goods. Readings include ancient texts in translation, books and articles by classicists and art historians, legal texts and lively page-turners. Students will discuss weekly readings, give brief slide lectures and a final presentation on a topic of their choice, which need not be confined to the ancient Mediterranean.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II
Instructors: Maxmin, J. (PI)

ARTHIST 207C: Phenomenology and Aesthetics in Medieval Art (ARTHIST 407C)

This course explores the phenomenal aspects of the medieval image and space such as glitter, shadow, smoke, reverberation and how these presence effects were conceptualized in medieval culture as animation. Focus is on a select group of monuments as well as engagement with medieval objects at the Cantor Art Museum and the facsimiles of medieval manuscripts kept at the Art Library and Special Collections. Among the monuments we will study are the Alhambra in Spain, the Apocalypse MSS, the Cantigas of Alfonso X, the Byzantine Joshua Roll, the Homiles of the Monk Kokkinobaphos, the Ashburnhamensis Pentateuch, and the Rossano Gospels.
Last offered: Winter 2015 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

ARTHIST 207D: Race and Ethnicity in Premodern Europe (ARTHIST 407D, HISTORY 215B, HISTORY 315B)

How do historians, art historians, and literary historians of premodern Europe shape their research and their teaching around questions of race? How do current debates on race theory shape our perception of the past and deepen historical inquiry? This graduate colloquium focuses on the most recent publications on race in medieval and early modern studies to reflect on such questions while examining the challenges that race studies put on historical definitions, research methodologies, as well as teaching institutions.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

ARTHIST 208: Hagia Sophia (ARTHIST 408, CLASSICS 173, CLASSICS 273)

This seminar uncovers the aesthetic principles and spiritual operations at work in Hagia Sophia, the church dedicated to Holy Wisdom in Constantinople. Rather than a static and inert structure, the Great Church emerges as a material body that comes to life when the morning or evening light resurrects the glitter of its gold mosaics and when the singing of human voices activates the reverberant and enveloping sound of its vast interior. Drawing on art and architectural history, liturgy, musicology, and acoustics, this course explores the Byzantine paradigm of animation arguing that it is manifested in the visual and sonic mirroring, in the chiastic structure of the psalmody, and in the prosody of the sung poetry. Together these elements orchestrate a multi-sensory experience that has the potential to destabilize the divide between real and oneiric, placing the faithful in a space in between terrestrial and celestial. A short film on aesthetics and samples of Byzantine chant digitally imprinted with the acoustics of Hagia Sophia are developed as integral segments of this research; they offer a chance for the student to transcend the limits of textual analysis and experience the temporal dimension of this process of animation of the inert.
Last offered: Winter 2020 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II

ARTHIST 213: Renaissance Print Culture: Art in the Cantor Arts Center

The seminar takes place in the Cantor Arts Center and provides a unique opportunity to study original works of art from the museum's storage. Beginning in the fifteenth century new techniques of reproduction changed the pictorial culture of Europe. Some engravings called attention to the engraver's virtuosity, and the private nature of the medium was explored for erotic imagery. By the sixteenth century printed images were used for political and religious propaganda during the societal upheavals.
Last offered: Autumn 2013 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Repeatable 2 times (up to 10 units total)
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