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MUSIC 154: History of Electronic Music

What is electronic music? Acousmatic, computer music, algorithmic composition, tape music, glitch, electronic, musique concrète, noise, laptop music, DJ'ing, organized sound...what do these labels mean? This course will provide a brief historical survey of electroacoustic music and discuss some of the most salient questions associated with it, from both a compositional and musicological point of view. Topics to be covered include: definitions of musical sounds; Schaefferian theory and musique concrète; serialism and elektronische Musik; tape music and computer music in the USA; analysis of electroacoustic music; sampling and intellectual property; algorithmic and computer-assisted composition; live-electronics and improvisation. The course does not require previous experience in the field. Classes will be based on discussion of selected listening and reading materials, as well as hands-on digital experimentation with sounds.
| UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Repeatable 2 times (up to 6 units total)

MUSIC 155: Intermedia Workshop (ARTSTUDI 239, MUSIC 255)

Students develop and produce intermedia works. Musical and visual approaches to the conceptualisation and shaping of time-based art. Exploration of sound and image relationship. Study of a wide spectrum of audiovisual practices including experimental animation, video art, dance, performance, non-narrative forms, interactive art and installation art. Focus on works that use music/sound and image as equal partners. Limited enrollment. Prerequisites: consent of instructors, and one of FILMPROD 114, ARTSTUDI 131, 138, 167, 177, 179, or MUSIC 123, or equivalent. May be repeated for credit
| UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Repeatable 2 times (up to 8 units total)

MUSIC 186B: American Song in the 20th Century and after (AMSTUD 186B, MUSIC 286B)

Critical and creative exploration of song in the Americas. About twenty-five key examples will guide discussion of the interactions between words, music, performance and culture. Weekly listening, reading and assignments will be organized around central themes: love, sex and romance; war and politics; labor and money; place; identity; society and everyday life. Genres include art song; blues, gospel, jazz and country; pop, soul, rock and hip-hop; bossa nova, nueva canción and salsa; electronic and experimental. Takehome and in-class assignments will include critical and creative writing, and music composition, production and performance; final projects may emphasize any of the above.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE

MUSIC 186D: Hearing and Seeing in the Long Nineteenth Century (HISTORY 241E, HISTORY 341E, MUSIC 286D)

Ideas about vision and hearing in science and culture from 1790 through 1910. The development of sensory physiology in the wake of Kant's Critique of Pure Reason, including Maine de Biran, Goethe, Helmholtz. Treatments of the senses in different spheres of culture and the arts: Baudelaire's flâneur, Impressionist painting, sound-reproduction technologies, the musical avant-garde, early cinema. Case studies include Cézanne, Debussy, and Russolo. Focus is on the complex relationships between science and culture and the role of the senses in the formation of the 'modern' subject. HISTORY241E/341E must be taken for 4 units.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II
Instructors: Kieffer, A. (PI)

MUSIC 208C: Architecture, Acoustics and Ritual in Byzantium (ARTHIST 208C, ARTHIST 408C, CLASSICS 175, MUSIC 408C, REES 208C, REES 408C, RELIGST 208C, RELIGST 308C)

Onassis Seminar "Icons of Sound: Architecture, Acoustics and Ritual in Byzantium". This year-long seminar explores the creation and operations of sacred space in Byzantium by focusing on the intersection of architecture, acoustics, music, and ritual. Through the support of the Onassis Foundation (USA), nine leading scholars in the field share their research and conduct the discussion of their pre-circulated papers. The goal is to develop a new interpretive framework for the study of religious experience and assemble the research tools needed for work in this interdisciplinary field.
| UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Repeatable 3 times (up to 9 units total)

MUSIC 220B: Compositional Algorithms, Psychoacoustics, and Computational Music

The use of high-level programming language as a compositional aid in creating musical structures. Advanced study of sound synthesis techniques. Simulation of a reverberant space and control of the position of sound within the space. See http://ccrma.stanford.edu/. Prerequisite: 220A.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II

NATIVEAM 134: Museum Cultures: Material Representation in the Past and Present (AMSTUD 134, ARCHLGY 134, ARCHLGY 234, ARTHIST 284B, CSRE 134, EDUC 214)

Students will open the ¿black box¿ of museums to consider the past and present roles of institutional collections, culminating in a student-curated exhibition. Today, museums assert their relevance as dynamic spaces for debate and learning. Colonialism and restitution, the politics of representation, human/object relationships, and changing frameworks of authority make museum work widely significant and consistently challenging. Through thinking-in-practice, this course reflexively explores ¿museum cultures¿: representations of ¿self¿ and ¿other¿ within museums and institutional cultures of the museum world itself.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Repeatable 3 times (up to 15 units total)
Instructors: Hodge, C. (PI)

NATIVEAM 143A: American Indian Mythology, Legend, and Lore (ENGLISH 43A, ENGLISH 143A)

(English majors and others taking 5 units, register for 143A.) Readings from American Indian literatures, old and new. Stories, songs, and rituals from the 19th century, including the Navajo Night Chant. Tricksters and trickster stories; war, healing, and hunting songs; Aztec songs from the 16th century. Readings from modern poets and novelists including N. Scott Momaday, Louise Erdrich, and Leslie Marmon Silko, and the classic autobiography, "Black Elk Speaks."
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED
Instructors: Fields, K. (PI)

OSPBER 17: Split Images: A Century of Cinema

20th-century German culture through film. The silent era, Weimar, and the instrumentalization of film in the Third Reich. The postwar era: ideological and aesthetic codes of DEFA, new German cinema, and post-Wende filmmaking including Run Lola Run and Goodbye Lenin. Aesthetic aspects of the films including image composition, camera and editing techniques, and relation between sound and image.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II
Instructors: Kramer, K. (PI)

OSPBER 43: Culture Clashes: Race, Ethnicity and Migration in Germany and the U.S.

This course interrogates cultural products from Germany and the U.S. (novels, graphic narratives, tv and film, advertising images) to explore the cultural imaginaries through which people understand themselves, their compatriots, and the incoming migrants to the geopolitical regions in which they live. In asking what it might take to create racial and ethnic justice in our time, we look at the diversity of group formation, attend to conflicting claims to national belonging, and debate theoretical perspectives on race and ethnicity.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED
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