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661 - 670 of 1079 results for: all courses

HUMCORE 134: Freedom Fighters, Terrorists, and Social Justice Warriors: Protest and Decolonization in South Asia (RELIGST 118)

The South Asian region comprises the contemporary nations of India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Nepal, Bhutan, and the Maldives. Racially, linguistically, politically, religiously, and in every way diverse, this region has also experienced the challenge of European colonialism, the effects of global climate change, the impact of rapid industrialization and urbanization, and internal conflicts within and between nations. It is also a creatively and intellectually vibrant region in which principles of non-violent resistance, award winning arts and literature, stunning natural environments, and scientific discovery are integral and celebrated. How have South Asians engaged the rapid social change of the twentieth century with decolonization and regional conflicts? What artistic and literary formations emerged from and drove the freedom movements against colonial rule and the nation forming projects that ensued? How have globalization and internal debates about national identities shaped contemporary South Asian societies?
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI
Instructors: Bigelow, A. (PI)

HUMCORE 135: Atlantic Folds: Indigeneity and Modernity (COMPLIT 46)

The Atlantic as an infinite doubling of ancient and modern. The Atlantic as an endless, watery cloth of African, American, and European folds, unfolding and refolding through bodies and ideas: blackness, whiteness, nature, nurture, water, blood, cannibal, mother, you, and I. The Atlantic as a concept, a space, a muse, a goddess. The Atlantic as birth and burial. One ocean under God, divisible, with salt enough for all who thirst. Authors include: Paul Gilroy, Gilles Deleuze, Chimamanda Adichie, Eduardo Viveiros de Castro, Davi Kopenawa, Pepetela, Beyoncé, and José Vasconcelos. This course is part of the Humanities Core: https://humanitiescore.stanford.edu/
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II
Instructors: Barletta, V. (PI)

ILAC 12Q: Humanities Core: Great Books, Big Ideas -- Europe, Middle Ages and Renaissance (DLCL 12Q, FRENCH 12Q, HUMCORE 12Q)

This three-quarter sequence asks big questions of major texts in the European and American tradition. What is a good life? How should society be organized? Who belongs? How should honor, love, sin, and similar abstractions govern our actions? What duty do we owe to the past and future? The second quarter focuses on the transition from the Middle Ages to Modernity, Europe's re-acquaintance with classical antiquity and its first contacts with the New World. Authors include Dante, Shakespeare, Machiavelli, Cervantes, and Milton. N.B. This is the second of three courses in the European track. These courses offer an unparalleled opportunity to study European history and culture, past and present. Take all three to experience a year-long intellectual community dedicated to exploring how ideas have shaped our world and future. Students who take HUMCORE 11 and HUMCORE 12Q will have preferential admission to HUMCORE 13Q (a WR2 seminar).
Last offered: Winter 2019 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II

ILAC 111Q: Texts and Contexts: Spanish/English Literary Translation Workshop (COMPLIT 111Q, DLCL 111Q)

This course introduces students to the theoretical knowledge and practical skills necessary to translate literary texts from Spanish to English and English to Spanish. Students will workshop and revise a translation project throughout the quarter. Topics may include comparative syntaxes, morphologies, and semantic systems; register and tone; audience; the role of translation in the development of languages and cultures; and the ideological and socio-cultural forces that shape translations.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE
Instructors: Santana, C. (PI)

ILAC 113Q: Borges and Translation (DLCL 113Q)

Borges's creative process and practice as seen through the lens of translation. How do Borges's texts articulate the relationships between reading, writing, and translation? Topics include authorship, fidelity, irreverence, and innovation. Readings will draw on Borges's short stories, translations, and essays. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisite: 100-level course in Spanish or permission of instructor.
Last offered: Autumn 2017 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE

ILAC 116: Approaches to Spanish and Spanish American Literature

Short stories, poetry, and theater. What analytical tools do the "grammars" of different genres call for? What contact zones exist between these genres? How have ideologies, the power of patronage, and shifting poetics shaped their production over time? Authors may include Arrabal, Borges, Cortázar, Cernuda, García Márquez, Lorca, Neruda, Rivas. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisite: 100-level course in Spanish or permission of instructor.
Last offered: Autumn 2018 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II

ILAC 119: The Memory of the Eye: Iberian Cinema from Buñuel to Almodóvar

An introduction to Spanish, Portuguese, Basque, and Catalan cinema through films from the 1920s and 30s to the present. How film uses a visual grammar of the image to tackle social questions and construct a collective memory. This course will consider the problems of individual recollection under conditions of collective trauma and distortion of the past, exploring the relation between film and history. The course will also focus on how images can be used to explore subjectivity and the passions. We will be watching outstanding films by Luis Buñuel, Carlos Saura, Víctor Erice, Bigas Luna, Pedro Almodóvar, Miguel Gomes, Julio Medem, Ventura Pons, Iciar Bollaín, and Isabel Coixet. Students will be responsible for watching all the films, engaging in lively discussion, in preparation for which, they will be asked to consider certain issues in writing before each class. Each student will present on one of the films for about fifteen minutes. There will be one short midterm essay and one final paper "on a different film."
Last offered: Spring 2020 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II

ILAC 122A: Radical Poetry: The Avant-garde in Latin America and Spain

The first few decades of the 20th century ushered in a dynamic literary and aesthetic renewal in Spain and Latin America. Young poets sought a radical change in response to a rapidly changing world, one marked by the horrors of World War I and the rise of a new technological urban society. This course will focus on the poetry and attendant manifestos of movements such as Creacionismo, Ultraismo, Estridentismo, Surrealismo and other -ismos. How did the European avant-garde (e.g. Futurism, Dada, and Surrealism) inform such aesthetic turns? In what ways did poetry assimilate modern visual culture while questioning established poetics? Authors may include Aleixandre, Borges, Cansino-Assens, G. Diego, G. de Torre, Huidobro, Larrea, Lorca, Maples Arce, Neruda, Tablada, and Vallejo. Taught in Spanish. Prior completion of SpanLang 102 is highly recommended.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II
Instructors: Santana, C. (PI)

ILAC 123A: Resisting Coloniality: Then and Now (COMPLIT 123A)

What are the different shapes that Western colonialism took over the centuries? How did people resist the symbolic and material oppressions engendered by such colonialist endeavors? This course offers a deep dive into history of the emergence of Western colonialism (alt: Spanish and Portuguese empires) by focusing on literary and cultural strategies of resisting coloniality in Latin America, from the 16th century to the present. Students will examine critiques of empire through a vast array of sources (novel, letter, short story, sermon, history, essay), spanning from early modern denunciations of the oppression of indigenous and enslaved peoples to modern Latin American answers to the three dominant cultural paradigms in post-independence period: Spain, France, and the United States. Through an examination of different modes of resistance, students will learn to identify the relation between Western colonialism and the discriminatory discourses that divided people based on their class more »
What are the different shapes that Western colonialism took over the centuries? How did people resist the symbolic and material oppressions engendered by such colonialist endeavors? This course offers a deep dive into history of the emergence of Western colonialism (alt: Spanish and Portuguese empires) by focusing on literary and cultural strategies of resisting coloniality in Latin America, from the 16th century to the present. Students will examine critiques of empire through a vast array of sources (novel, letter, short story, sermon, history, essay), spanning from early modern denunciations of the oppression of indigenous and enslaved peoples to modern Latin American answers to the three dominant cultural paradigms in post-independence period: Spain, France, and the United States. Through an examination of different modes of resistance, students will learn to identify the relation between Western colonialism and the discriminatory discourses that divided people based on their class, gender, ethnicity, and race, and whose effects are still impactful for many groups of people nowadays. Authors may include Isabel Guevara, Catalina de Erauso, el Inca Garcilaso, Sor Juana, Simón Bolívar, Flora Tristán, Silvina Ocampo, Jorge Luis Borges, and Gabriel García Márquez. Taught in Spanish.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

ILAC 124: Coming of Age in Latin America

What can a novel tell us about coming of age? How does a novel shape a character when they do not conform to social norms? This course interrogates how the coming of age novel the Bildungsroman may combine, successfully or not, a narrative of national social progress and of personal growth. We will compare and contrast short selections from 19th, 20th and 21st centuries novels, while analyzing two masterpieces in depth. Taught in Spanish.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II
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