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61 - 70 of 197 results for: CLASSICS

CLASSICS 96: The Secret Lives of Statues from Ancient Egypt to Confederate Monuments (ARCHLGY 96, ARTHIST 104A)

Statues, human-shaped sculptures, walk a fine line between being inert matter and living entities. Throughout human existence, humans have recognized that statues are not alive even as they understand that statues are capable of becoming potent allies or enemies. They are capable of engendering profound emotional responses, embodying potent ideas, and co-opting the past in service of the present. However, the same materiality that endows statues with these exceptional capacities also makes them vulnerable to humans intent on acquiring otherwise-expensive materials cheaply, commiting sectarian violence by proxy, and obliterating the material manifestations of others¿ memories.nnIn this course, we will study sixteen (groups of) statues thematically. To do this, we will draw on a wide variety of disciplines, including archaeology, art history, history, law, media studies, museum studies, and religious studies, to articulate how people in diverse places and times have revered and reviled statues precisely because they are uncanny objects that seem to have an all-too-human kind of agency. In so doing, we will gain appreciation for and insight into how and why the statues in our own lives are significant.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI
Instructors: Gisch, D. (PI)

CLASSICS 101G: Advanced Greek: Plato

Selections from Plato's Symposium. Review of Greek grammar and syntax with a view to transitioning students from Intermediate Greek to fluent reading of Attic prose. Special attention as well to 5th-century BC political and social context, history of Greek rhetoric, and introduction to Plato's philosophical system. Classics majors and minors may repeat for credit with advance approval from the Director of Undergraduate Studies.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: Language | Repeatable for credit

CLASSICS 101L: Advanced Latin: Livy

Livy's Books I through V recount Rome's greatest characters, myths, and legends from the city's foundation to the sack by the Gauls around 390BCE. This course will examine Livy's account of the early history of Rome; Romulus and Remus, the early kings, the fall of the Tarquins, the founding of the Republic, and the early wars against the Etruscans, Latins, and Celts in Italy. How did Livy make his narrative exciting and instructive to his readers? What virtues and flaws does Livy give to the men and women of the early republic, and why? We will pay close attention to grammar, vocabulary, and improvement of reading fluency. Classics majors and minors must take for a letter grade and may repeat for credit with advance approval from the Director of Undergraduate Studies.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: Language | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Mallon, K. (PI)

CLASSICS 102G: Advanced Greek: Aeschylus

As the only extant tragedy from Greek antiquity that features characters who explicitly reflect on their black skin color, Aeschylus' Suppliant Women destabilizes a monolithic definition of alterity. In this tragedy, fifty black Egyptian Greek women transform from frightened maidens into astute performers who force their audience to contend with their perceived differences. While reading this ancient Greek tragedy, students will increase their knowledge of Greek grammar and syntax, become familiar with essential aspects of Greek tragedy, and explore Aeschylus' place within the tragic tradition. Classics majors and minors may repeat for credit with advance approval from the Director of Undergraduate Studies.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: Language | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Derbew, S. (PI)

CLASSICS 102L: Advanced Latin: Early Latin (CLASSICS 209L)

Most of the literature that we read in Latin is from a relatively late period of the language's history. However, Latin-speaking people wrote sophisticated texts hundreds of years before Cicero and Caesar, although much of this early writing has been lost to history. But not all! In this class we will explore the rich remains of Early Latin, with readings that include archaic inscriptions, early Latin prose from Cato the Elder, selections from the comedies of Plautus and Terence, and fragments from Androniucs, Naevius, and Ennius, the first known writers of Latin epic poetry. In parallel, we will also explore the history of the Latin language during this early period, emphasizing the historical developments that distinguish Early Latin from Classical Latin, as well as the historical reasons so much early Latin writing was not preserved. Students should be able to read Latin at an Intermediate-to-Advanced level, but no experience with linguistics, Early Latin, or Roman History is expected or required. Classics majors and minors must take course for letter grade. May be repeated for credit with advance approval from the Director of Undergraduate Studies.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: Language, WAY-A-II | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Bork, H. (PI)

CLASSICS 103G: Advanced Greek: Lyric Poetry

Invectives, love songs, drinking songs, elegies, and choral odes from 700-500 B.C.E. Readings include Sappho, Alcaeus, Archilochus, Mimnermus, Alcman, Solon, and Pindar. Classics majors and minors may repeat for credit with advance approval from the Director of Undergraduate Studies. Classics majors and minors must take for a letter grade and may repeat for credit with advance approval from the Director of Undergraduate Studies.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: Language | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Peponi, A. (PI)

CLASSICS 103L: Advanced Latin: Lucan's Pharsalia

In the year 60 CE, Marcus Annaeus Lucanus was a favorite of of the emperor Nero; five years later he was compelled to end his own life as a participant in the Pisonian conspiracy. In these last years of his life, he wrote the 10 books of his likely incomplete Pharsalia, also known as De Bello Civili. This epic looks back over a century to what the author describes not just a civil wars but as bella plus quam civilia. In this class, we will follow Lucan's epic to the extremes of graphic violence in Latin, pitting Roman against Roman, man against snake, and corpse against witch. We will explore Lucan's masterwork against the landscape of the Neronian era and in comparison with other writing of this so-called silver age of Latin literature. Readings will be in the original Latin with the addition of relevant secondary scholarship. We will review questions of grammar and syntax, rhetorical terms, and historical context as needed. Classics majors and minors must take course for letter grade. May be repeated for credit with advance approval from the Director of Undergraduate Studies.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: Language, WAY-A-II | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Dubit, R. (PI)

CLASSICS 104A: Latin Syntax I (CLASSICS 204A)

Intensive review of Latin syntax. See CLASSICS 206A/B for supplemental courses. Students should take both syntax and semantics in the same quarters. Prerequisite for undergraduates: three years of Latin. First-year graduate students register for CLASSICS 204A.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4
Instructors: Devine, A. (PI)

CLASSICS 104B: Latin Syntax II (CLASSICS 204B)

Intensive review of Latin syntax. See CLASSICS 206A/B for supplemental courses. Students should take both syntax and semantics in the same quarters. Prerequisite for undergraduates: three years of Latin. First-year graduate students register for CLASSICS 204B.
Terms: Sum | Units: 4
Instructors: Devine, A. (PI)

CLASSICS 105A: Greek Syntax: Prose Composition (CLASSICS 205A)

The goal of this course is to provide a thorough review of Greek syntax, reinforced by reading selected short passages of Attic Greek in some detail, in order to develop a much greater command of the language and to increase reading skills as well as an understanding of the stylistic features of the major prose genres.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5
Instructors: Stephens, S. (PI)
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