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241 - 250 of 354 results for: CSI::certificate

LAW 805Z: Policy Practicum: Supporting INTERPOL's Efforts to Combat Transnational Crime

Today, the international community faces increasingly complex security challenges arising from transnational criminal activities. Effective international cooperation among national police agencies is critical in combatting cross-boundary criminal threats like terrorism, human and drug trafficking, and cybercrime. INTERPOL---the world's largest international police organization---has aggressively worked to counter criminal networks across the globe by facilitating international police cooperation through global information sharing via its criminal databases. To conduct cross-border investigations and tackle organized crime, the law enforcement agencies around the globe can instantly access millions of records on fingerprints, DNA, stolen motor vehicles, firearms, and travel documents stored in INTERPOL's databases. Only the designated law enforcement agencies from INTERPOL's member countries are authorized to share and add information to these databases. This project builds on research more »
Today, the international community faces increasingly complex security challenges arising from transnational criminal activities. Effective international cooperation among national police agencies is critical in combatting cross-boundary criminal threats like terrorism, human and drug trafficking, and cybercrime. INTERPOL---the world's largest international police organization---has aggressively worked to counter criminal networks across the globe by facilitating international police cooperation through global information sharing via its criminal databases. To conduct cross-border investigations and tackle organized crime, the law enforcement agencies around the globe can instantly access millions of records on fingerprints, DNA, stolen motor vehicles, firearms, and travel documents stored in INTERPOL's databases. Only the designated law enforcement agencies from INTERPOL's member countries are authorized to share and add information to these databases. This project builds on research conducted through past iterations of this practicum contributing to INTERPOL's Strategic Framework 2017-2020. Research teams will work directly with senior INTERPOL officials (via video-conferencing and email) to help modernize INTERPOL's organizational structure and improve the agency's efforts to counter cyber-crime and terrorism. Research will likely focus on how INTERPOL can amend its Rules on the Processing of Data and its Constitution to provide the organization with greater flexibility in receiving information from the private sector. The research may also focus on understanding the role of open source data in cyber investigations and identify the legal and policy challenges INTERPOL's criminal intelligence officers may face when relying on open source info in their analysis. This Practicum is open to graduate students from law (2L, 3L, and Advanced Degree), business, international policy, communications, computer science, and other relevant programs. Highly qualified undergraduates are also invited to apply. The practicum meets 9-10:30 on Wednesdays. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Performance, Class Participation, Written Assignments, Final Paper. Cross-listed with International Policy ( INTLPOL 255) in Autumn and Winter.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit

LAW 2503: Energy Law

Modern energy systems aim to deliver a supply of reliable, low-cost, and clean energy; in turn, they require major capital investments in infrastructure projects, some of which have the features of a natural monopoly and therefore require ongoing economic regulation. The U.S. energy system today is subject to a complex regime of state and federal laws. We will examine the historical role of state-level electric utility regulation, tracing its evolution into the various forms of regulated and deregulated energy markets now in use in the U.S. electricity and natural gas sectors. Contemporary energy law increasingly involves a delicate federalist balance where state and federal regulators share overlapping authority in contested policy areas that are subject to major technological and economic change. Finally, we will interrogate the contested ideals of regulation and competition, which private, non-profit, and governmental stakeholders deploy in legal and political fora to advance privat more »
Modern energy systems aim to deliver a supply of reliable, low-cost, and clean energy; in turn, they require major capital investments in infrastructure projects, some of which have the features of a natural monopoly and therefore require ongoing economic regulation. The U.S. energy system today is subject to a complex regime of state and federal laws. We will examine the historical role of state-level electric utility regulation, tracing its evolution into the various forms of regulated and deregulated energy markets now in use in the U.S. electricity and natural gas sectors. Contemporary energy law increasingly involves a delicate federalist balance where state and federal regulators share overlapping authority in contested policy areas that are subject to major technological and economic change. Finally, we will interrogate the contested ideals of regulation and competition, which private, non-profit, and governmental stakeholders deploy in legal and political fora to advance private gain and public goods. Students who complete the class will gain a historical understanding of how economic regulation of the energy sector has evolved since the early 20th century, a durable conceptual framework for understanding modern energy law and policy debates, and a practical understanding of energy law designed for future practitioners. Non-law students interested in energy issues are highly encouraged to take this course, as energy law literacy is essential to careers in the sector. Elements used in grading: class participation, short written assignments, and a one-day take-home final exam. Cross-listed with Environment and Resources ( ENVRES 226).
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

LAW 2508: The Business of Water

One of the fastest growing economic sectors is the water field, and private water companies are playing an increasingly important role around the world in water management. In many cases, private companies have made important contributions to meeting water needs (e.g., in the development of new technologies and expanding water supplies). In other cases, however, the involvement of private companies has proven controversial (e.g., when private companies have taken over public water supply systems in developing countries such as Bolivia). This course will look at established or emerging businesses in the water sector and the legal, economic, and social issues that they generate. These businesses include investor-owned water utilities, water technology companies (e.g., companies investing in new desalination or water recycling technologies), water-right funds (who directly buy and sell water rights), social impact funds, innovative agricultural operations, water concessionaires, and infra more »
One of the fastest growing economic sectors is the water field, and private water companies are playing an increasingly important role around the world in water management. In many cases, private companies have made important contributions to meeting water needs (e.g., in the development of new technologies and expanding water supplies). In other cases, however, the involvement of private companies has proven controversial (e.g., when private companies have taken over public water supply systems in developing countries such as Bolivia). This course will look at established or emerging businesses in the water sector and the legal, economic, and social issues that they generate. These businesses include investor-owned water utilities, water technology companies (e.g., companies investing in new desalination or water recycling technologies), water-right funds (who directly buy and sell water rights), social impact funds, innovative agricultural operations, water concessionaires, and infrastructure construction companies and investors. Each week will focus on a different business and company. Company executives will attend the class session and discuss their business with the class. In most classes, we will examine (1) the viability and efficacy of the company's business plan, (2) the legal and/or social issues arising from the business' work, and (3) how the business might contribute to improved water management and policy. Each student will be expected to write (1) two short reflection papers during the course of the quarter on businesses that present to the class, and (2) a 10- to15-page paper at the conclusion on the class on either a water company of the student's choice or a policy initiative that can improve the role that business plays in improving water management (either in a particular sector or more generally). Elements used in grading: Attendance, Class Participation, Written Assignments, Final Paper. Cross-listed with Civil & Environmental Engineering ( CEE 273B).
Terms: Spr | Units: 2

LAW 7010: Constitutional Law: The Fourteenth Amendment

This course examines various aspects of the Fourteenth Amendment, with special attention paid to equal protection and substantive due process. We will examine many contested constitutional questions, including, for example: How did gay and lesbian relationships go so quickly from being subject to criminal prohibition to being eligible for marriage? What justifies the Supreme Court's striking down a law mandating segregated schools, when it had upheld an analogous law half a century earlier? Must the law treat all individuals identically, or may and should it grant special protections to members of historically disadvantaged groups? To what sources might (and should) a judge look to give content to vague constitutional terms like "equal protection" and "due process"? How can we distinguish "law" from "politics" in this area? Readings will include judicial opinions and some scholarly commentary. Class discussion will be supplemented with group exercises of various sorts. Elements used in grading: Class participation and exam.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: Schacter, J. (PI)

MATSCI 156: Solar Cells, Fuel Cells, and Batteries: Materials for the Energy Solution

Operating principles and applications of emerging technological solutions to the energy demands of the world. The scale of global energy usage and requirements for possible solutions. Basic physics and chemistry of solar cells, fuel cells, and batteries. Performance issues, including economics, from the ideal device to the installed system. The promise of materials research for providing next generation solutions. Undergraduates register in 156 for 4 units; graduates register in 256 for 3 units. Prerequisites: MATSCI 145 and 152 or equivalent coursework in thermodynamics and electronic properties.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci
Instructors: Clemens, B. (PI)

MATSCI 302: Solar Cells

In the last 15 years, the solar power market has grown in size by 100 times while solar modules prices have fallen by 20 times. Unsubsidized, solar power projects now compete favorably against fossil fuels in many countries and is on track to be the largest energy provider in the future. How did this happen? nnIn MatSci 302 we will take a comprehensive look at solar cells starting from the underlying device physics that are relevant to all photovoltaic cell technologies. We will then look at the undisputed king (silicon based solar cells); how do they work today and how will they develop in the future. Finally, we will look at why past challengers have failed and how future challengers can succeed. This class will be co-taught by Brian and Craig, who graduated from the Material Science PhD program in 2011 and then started PLANT PV, a startup that developed a solar technology from idea to protoype and then full implementation on production lines in China. The lecturers routinely visit manufacturing facilities in Asia and work closely with engineering staff at the largest solar cell makers in the world to implement their technology into production lines.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

ME 206A: Design for Extreme Affordability

Design for Extreme Affordability (fondly called Extreme) is a two-quarter course offered by the d.school through the School of Engineering and the Graduate School of Business. This multidisciplinary project-based experience creates an enabling environment in which students learn to design products and services that will change the lives of the world's poorest citizens. Students work directly with course partners on real world problems, the culmination of which is actual implementation and real impact. Topics include design thinking, product and service design, rapid prototype engineering and testing, business modelling, social entrepreneurship, team dynamics, impact measurement, operations planning and ethics. Possibility to travel overseas during spring break. Previous projects include d.light, Driptech, Earthenable, Embrace, the Lotus Pump, MiracleBrace, Noora Health and Sanku. Periodic design reviews; Final course presentation and expo; industry and adviser interaction. Limited enrollment via application. Must sign up for ME206A and ME206B. See extreme.stanford.edu
Terms: Win | Units: 4

ME 206B: Design for Extreme Affordability

Design for Extreme Affordability (fondly called Extreme) is a two-quarter course offered by the d.school through the School of Engineering and the Graduate School of Business. This multidisciplinary project-based experience creates an enabling environment in which students learn to design products and services that will change the lives of the world's poorest citizens. Students work directly with course partners on real world problems, the culmination of which is actual implementation and real impact. Topics include design thinking, product and service design, rapid prototype engineering and testing, business modelling, social entrepreneurship, team dynamics, impact measurement, operations planning and ethics. Possibility to travel overseas during spring break. Previous projects include d.light, Driptech, Earthenable, Embrace, the Lotus Pump, MiracleBrace, Noora Health and Sanku. Periodic design reviews; Final course presentation and expo; industry and adviser interaction. Limited enrollment via application. Must sign up for ME206A and ME206B. See extreme.stanford.edu
Terms: Spr | Units: 4

ME 243: Designing Emotion- for Reactive Car Interfaces

Students learn to define emotions as physiology, expression, and private experience using the automobile and shared space. Explores the meaning and impact of personal and user car experience. Reflective, narrative, and socio-cognitive techniques serve to make sense of mobility experiences; replay memories; examine engagement; understand user interviews. This course celebrates car fascination and leads the student through finding and telling the car experience through discussion, ethnographic research, interviews, and diverse individual and collaborative narrative methods-verbal, non-verbal, and in car experiences. Methods draw from socio-cognitive psychology, design thinking, and fine art, and are applied to the car or mobility experience. Course culminates in a final individual narrative presentation and group project demonstration. Class size limited to 18.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Karanian, B. (PI)

ME 302B: The Future of the Automobile- Driver Assistance and Automated Driving

This course provides a holistic overview over the field of vehicle automation. The course starts with the history of vehicle automation and then introduces key terminology and taxonomy. Guest lecturers present the legal and policy aspects of vehicle automation both on the federal and state level. Then, the state of the art in vehicle automation is provided. This includes sensor and actuator technology as well as the driver assistance technology in cars today. Finally, the technology currently being developed for future highly and fully automated vehicles is described, including a high-level introduction of the software and algorithms used as well as HMI and system aspects. Students are asking to work in groups on a current topic related to vehicle automation and present their findings in the final two classes in a short presentation.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Becker, J. (PI)
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