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281 - 290 of 297 results for: ARTHIST

ARTHIST 489A: Making the Masterpiece in Song Dynasty China (ARTHIST 289A)

Studies of canon formation involving Song Dynasty (10-13th c.) Chinese works of painting, calligraphy, ceramics, and architecture. The roles of early art writing and criticism; collecting histories; art historical theory; / copying, imitation, and reproductive practices; period and regional taste; and modern museological and art historical discourses in identifying and constructing a canon of Song masterworks.
Last offered: Winter 2015

ARTHIST 490: Curatorial Activism in the Arts of Africa

Enrollment restricted to graduate students and advanced undergraduates. What is contemporary in African art and how does one curate the contemporary in and through African art? The course examines curatorial practices and activist projects. Topics include redefining museum exhibitions and collections of African art at the Cantor Arts Center and museums around the world; breaking away from stereotypical representations of the arts and cultures of Africa; controversial issues and dilemmas; curatorial activities directed toward cultural, social, and political activism; strategic modes of display and design; subjectivity vs. objectivity; and fostering critical dialogues about the arts and cultures of Africa.

ARTHIST 490A: Indigenous Cultural Heritage: Protection, Practice, Repatriation (ARTHIST 190A, PUBLPOL 190, PUBLPOL 290)

This interdisciplinary seminar explores pressing questions relating to the protection, practice and repatriation of the cultural heritage of Indigenous peoples from North America and beyond. Using an innovative combination of in-class lectures and videos of interviews with renowned experts, including Indigenous leaders, scholars, artists and performers and museum professionals from around the world, this seminar will explore and problematize, among other subjects: the impact of colonialism, urbanization and other political, legal, economic, religious and cultural forces on understandings and definitions of "indigenous" and "cultural heritage"; the development of international law relating to Indigenous peoples¿ cultural rights; international, domestic, and tribal heritage protection and repatriation laws/initiatives including the 2007 United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP), the 1990 US Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), and more »
This interdisciplinary seminar explores pressing questions relating to the protection, practice and repatriation of the cultural heritage of Indigenous peoples from North America and beyond. Using an innovative combination of in-class lectures and videos of interviews with renowned experts, including Indigenous leaders, scholars, artists and performers and museum professionals from around the world, this seminar will explore and problematize, among other subjects: the impact of colonialism, urbanization and other political, legal, economic, religious and cultural forces on understandings and definitions of "indigenous" and "cultural heritage"; the development of international law relating to Indigenous peoples¿ cultural rights; international, domestic, and tribal heritage protection and repatriation laws/initiatives including the 2007 United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP), the 1990 US Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), and others; past and present Western museum practices and guidelines relating to display, preservation, provenance research and repatriation of indigenous cultural material; the meaning of repatriation to Indigenous peoples and other stakeholders; and resolving repatriation disputes, including by alternative dispute resolution (ADR) processes. While case studies will relate primarily to Indigenous peoples of North America, comparisons will be drawn with the situation of Indigenous peoples in other regions, such as Oceania and Russia. Each week students will brainstorm actionable ideas for amending/supplementing current frameworks in order to give force to the cultural rights enumerated in UNDRIP. The overall seminar experience will involve discussions of lectures and video content, assigned readings, quizzes, a class visit to the Cantor Center Native Americas collection, and visits to our classroom by experts. Elements used in grading: class participation, attendance and a final project (one-day take-home exam; or research paper or film project with instructor's consent).
Last offered: Autumn 2016

ARTHIST 491: Riot!: Visualizing Civil Unrest in the 20th and 21st Centuries (AFRICAAM 291, AFRICAAM 491, ARTHIST 291)

This course explores the visual legacy of civil unrest in the United States. Focusing on the 1965 Watts Rebellion, the 1992 Los Angeles Riots, and the 2014 Ferguson Uprising, students will closely examine photographs, television broadcasts, newspapers, magazines, and film and video representations of unrest. In addition, students will visually analyze the works of artists who have responded to the instances of police brutality and/or challenged the systemic racism, xenophobia, and anti-black violence leading to and surrounding these events.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5
Instructors: Salseda, R. (PI)

ARTHIST 492: Romancing the Stone: Crystal Media from Babylon to Superman (ARTHIST 292, FRENCH 292, FRENCH 392)

This seminar investigates the importance of rock crystal and its imitations as material, medium, and metaphor from antiquity until modernity. The objects examined include rings, reliquaries, lenses, and the Crystal Aesthetic in early twentieth-century architecture and even Superman's Fortress of Solitude. The texts range from Pliny to Arabic Poetry to Romance Literature to modern manifestos.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5

ARTHIST 497: American Mystics

This seminar will consider the role of mysticism in American art and culture. Long denigrated as irrational or escapist, mysticism in fact offers a site from which to investigate and challenge entrenched assumptions of linear time, historical positivism, hierarchies of taste, and rationality that remain the epistemic grounding of art history. Topics covered will include Transcendentalism¿s debt to Buddhism; the Aesthetic Movement; Aleister Crowley, Kenneth Anger, and occultism; Rastafarianism; Afrofuturism; psychedelia, drugs, and the counterculture, among many others. Readings will include work by Max Weber; Theodor Adorno; Sylvia Wynter; Toni Morrison; Marcel Mauss; and Ashon Crawley. Special attention will be paid to issues of race, ethnicity, and decolonizing methodologies.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5
Instructors: Kwon, M. (PI)

ARTHIST 502: Methods and Debates

Problems in visuality, authorship, representation, and the institutions of art history, among other issues that have helped to shape - and to challenge - the the discipline and its practice.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5
Instructors: Troy, N. (PI)

ARTHIST 600: Art History Bibliography and Library Methods

Terms: Aut | Units: 1

ARTHIST 610: Teaching Praxis

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit

ARTHIST 620: Qualifying Examination Preparation

For Art History Ph.D. candidates. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5 | Repeatable for credit
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