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281 - 290 of 1151 results for: all courses

CSRE 189: Race and Immigration (AFRICAAM 190, SOC 189, SOC 289)

In the contemporary United States, supposedly race-neutral immigration laws have racially-unequal consequences. Immigrants from Mexico, Central America, and the Middle East are central to ongoing debates about who's includable, and who's excludable, from American society. These present-day dynamics mirror the historical forms of exclusion imposed on immigrants from places as diverse as China, Eastern Europe, Ireland, Italy, Japan, and much of Africa. These groups' varied experiences of exclusion underscore the long-time encoding of race into U.S. immigration policy and practice. Readings and discussions center on how immigration law has become racialized in its construction and in its enforcement over the last 150 years.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

CSRE 192E: History of Sexual Violence in America (AFRICAAM 192, AMSTUD 258, FEMGEN 258, FEMGEN 358, HISTORY 258, HISTORY 358)

This undergraduate/graduate colloquium explores the history of sexual violence in America, with particular attention to the intersections of gender and race in the construction of rape. We discuss the changing definitions of sexual violence in law and in cultural representations from early settlement through the late-twentieth century, including slavery, wartime and prison rape, the history of lynching and anti-lynching movements, and feminist responses to sexual violence. In addition to introducing students to the literature on sexual violence, the course attempts to teach critical skills in the analysis of secondary and primary historical texts. Students write short weekly reading responses and a final paper; no final exam; fifth unit research or CEL options.nnLimited enrollment, permission of instructor required. Submit application form and indicate interest in CEL option. Priority admission to History, FGSS, CSRE, AFRICAAM, and AMSTUD declared majors and minors. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)
Last offered: Spring 2019 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

CSRE 196C: Introduction to Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity (ENGLISH 172D, PSYCH 155, SOC 146, TAPS 165)

How different disciplines approach topics and issues central to the study of ethnic and race relations in the U.S. and elsewhere. Lectures by senior faculty affiliated with CSRE. Discussions led by CSRE teaching fellows. Includes an optional Haas Center for Public Service certified Community Engaged Learning section. In accordance with Stanford virtual learning policies implemented for the Spring Quarter, all community engagement activities for this section will be conducted virtually. Please sign up for section 2 #33285 with Kendra, A. if you are interested in participating in virtual community engagement.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

CSRE 201L: Doing Public History (HISTORY 200L)

Examines history outside the classroom; its role in political/cultural debates in U.S. and abroad. Considers functions, practices, and reception of history in public arena, including museums, memorials, naming of buildings, courtrooms, websites, op-eds. Analyzes controversies arising when historians' work outside the academy challenges the status quo; role funders, interest groups, and the public play in promoting, shaping, or suppressing historical interpretation. Who gets to tell a group's story? What changes can public history enable? Students will engage in public history projects.
Last offered: Spring 2020 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

CSRE 205L: Prostitution & Sex Trafficking: Regulating Morality and the Status of Women (FEMGEN 205L, HISTORY 205L, HUMRTS 119)

Examines governmental policies toward prostitution from the late 19th century to the present. Focuses on the underlying attitudes, assumptions, strategies, and consequences of various historical and current legal frameworks regulating prostitution, including: prohibitionism, abolitionism, legalization, partial decriminalization, and full decriminalization. Special focus on these policies' effects on sex trafficking, sex worker rights, and the status of women. Emphasis on Europe and the U.S., with additional cases from across the globe.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Jolluck, K. (PI)

CSRE 218: Islam, Race and Revolution: A Pan-American Approach (AMSTUD 218, RELIGST 218, RELIGST 318)

Taking a pan-American approach to the study of religious traditions, this upper-level course traces the history of the critical intersection between race, religion and revolution among Muslims from the turn of the nineteenth century until the present day. Moving from the Atlantic Revolutions of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, to the United States, to the decolonizing Third World, and then finally to the contemporary Middle East, this class will emphasize that Islam and race together have been used by many groups in order to challenge existing power structures, agitate for change, and more than occasionally, transform the social, cultural and governmental structures comprising their worlds. Moreover, although this class is concentrated upon religious formations in the Americas, students will explore global events throughout the Muslim world in order to examine how global politics contribute to religious formations, solidarities and identities. At the conclusion of th more »
Taking a pan-American approach to the study of religious traditions, this upper-level course traces the history of the critical intersection between race, religion and revolution among Muslims from the turn of the nineteenth century until the present day. Moving from the Atlantic Revolutions of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, to the United States, to the decolonizing Third World, and then finally to the contemporary Middle East, this class will emphasize that Islam and race together have been used by many groups in order to challenge existing power structures, agitate for change, and more than occasionally, transform the social, cultural and governmental structures comprising their worlds. Moreover, although this class is concentrated upon religious formations in the Americas, students will explore global events throughout the Muslim world in order to examine how global politics contribute to religious formations, solidarities and identities. At the conclusion of this course, students will be expected to write a 10-15 page research paper, and a topic will be chosen in consultation with the instructor. Students will also be expected to write weekly reflection papers, which will serve to facilitate class discussion. Undergraduates register for 200-level for 5 units. Graduate students register for 300-level for 3-5 units.
Last offered: Spring 2018 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

CSRE 222: The Political Psychology of Intolerance (POLISCI 222)

This seminar explores the political psychology of intolerance. It focuses on two problems in particular race in America and the challenge of Muslim inclusion in Western Europe. It concentrates on primary research. The readings consist of both classic and contemporary (including on-going) studies of prejudice and politics.
Last offered: Winter 2018 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

CSRE 226: Race and Racism in American Politics (AMSTUD 226, POLISCI 226, POLISCI 326)

Topics include the historical conceptualization of race; whether and how racial animus reveals itself and the forms it might take; its role in the creation and maintenance of economic stratification; its effect on contemporary U.S. partisan and electoral politics; and policy making consequences.
Last offered: Autumn 2015 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

CSRE 226D: The Holocaust: Insights from New Research (CSRE 326D, HISTORY 226D, HISTORY 326D, JEWISHST 226E, JEWISHST 326D)

Overview of the history of the Holocaust, the genocide of European Jews. Explores its causes, course, consequences, and memory. Addresses the events themselves, as well as the roles of perpetrators and bystanders, dilemmas faced by victims, collaboration of local populations, and the issue of rescue. Considers how the Holocaust was and is remembered and commemorated by victims and participants alike. Uses different kinds of sources: scholarly work, memoirs, diaries, film, and primary documents.
Last offered: Spring 2020 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

CSRE 230A: Digital Civil Society (AFRICAAM 230A, COMM 230A)

Digital technologies are changing the way members of the civil society come together to change the world. The 'civil society' includes social movements, grassroots activism, philanthropists, unions, nonprofits, NGOs, charities, and cooperatives, among others. Their mission is to effect important social and political transformations to bring about what they see as a better world. But their work and strategies are subject to significant changes in the digital era. The course will analyze the opportunities and challenges digital technologies present for associational life, free expression, privacy, and collective action. We will cover a wide range of key themes, including digital rights advocacy and racial justice, community-owned networks and de-colonial design, activist resistance to surveillance technologies, algorithmic bias, Black Twitter, and digital misinformation, micro-targeting and voter suppression. The course is global in scope (we will read authors and study cases from America, Europe, Asia, and Africa), taught by a multidisciplinary team (history, communication, computational social science, education), and is committed to a syllabus centering on the scholarship, expertise, and voices of marginalized communities.No prerequisite.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI
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