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241 - 250 of 301 results for: ARTHIST

ARTHIST 426: NARRATIVE THEORY & VISUAL FORM

The theoretical terrain of narrative studies in literary criticism and historiography. The critical implications of narrative analysis for the writing of history in general. Readings integrated with students' current research projects.
Last offered: Spring 2013

ARTHIST 429: Vienna and Hamburg : Readings in the Science of Art History

The place of art history in a university curriculum was established in Europe only during the course of the nineteenth century, and only after demonstrating that its methods are rigorous and that its goals have little to do with subjective connoisseurship or personal taste. The ambition was to develop a properly ¿scientific¿ [wissenschaftlich] practice able to claim legitimacy among the traditional disciplines of university study and research. Two German-speaking centers were critical to this development : the Institute for Austrian Historical Research in Vienna and the Warburg Library for the Science of Culture at the University of Hamburg. The best-known author of the first is Alois Riegl, while the second counts Aby Warburg, Erwin Panofsky, and Ernst Cassirer among its members. Recent books on both centers, and the availability of texts in English by others of each group now make it possible to revisit their debates about ¿scientific¿ art history that shaped the field as we know it today. This seminar will read closely a selection of these texts with the aim of understanding more fully our own intellectual history and its impact upon discussions concerning the place of our discipline within the humanities today.
Last offered: Winter 2016

ARTHIST 430: Cinema and Ideology (FILMSTUD 430)

The relationship between cinema and ideology from theoretical and historical perspectives, emphasizing Marxist and psychoanalytic approaches. The practice of political filmmaking, and the cinema as an audiovisual apparatus and socio-cultural institution. Topics include: dialectics; revolutionary aesthetics; language and power; commodity fetishism; and nationalism. Filmmakers include Dziga Vertov, Jean-Luc Godard, Bruce Conner, and Marco Ferreri. Theoretical writers include Karl Marx, Sergei Eisenstein, and Slavoj Zizek. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5
Instructors: Levi, P. (PI)

ARTHIST 430B: Image and Text in Chinese Painting (ARTHIST 230B, CHINA 230, CHINA 430)

An examination of many types of interactions between images and texts in Chinese painting. These include poetic lines inscribed on paintings (as response or as a theme given to the artist to paint), paintings that emulate or transform ancient poetic couplets, or illustrate poetic and literary narratives, and calligraphic inscriptions. Attention will be given both to comparative perspectives and to the special aesthetic and intellectual consequences that the conjunction of the literary and visual modes give to Chinese artistic expression. [Undergraduate enrollment with consent of one of the instructors]
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Repeatable for credit

ARTHIST 432: Rethinking American Art

A re-examination of American art of the 18th and 19th centuries, focusing on works in the collection of the de Young Museum, San Francisco. The class will meet weekly at the de Young, where we will be joined by Professor Margaretta Lovell and students from the University of California, Berkeley. Each student will pursue an in-depth study of a single work in the Museum's superb American collections, using documents of social and cultural history. We will pay particular attention to recent scholarship, questions of genre (landscape, portrait, still life and images of everyday life), and the "biography of objects" (the way works of art shift in context and interpretation over time).nGraduate seminar open to advanced undergraduates with the instructor¿s approval.
Last offered: Autumn 2013

ARTHIST 440: Millennium Approaches: The Art of the 1990s (ARTHIST 240)

This seminar will examine the art historical legacy of the 1990s, the decade of Bill Clinton, Beavis and Butthead, and Y2K. By placing art in conversation with music, popular culture, and political events, we will explore the dark underbelly of the decade's facade of sunny optimism. Key topics will include the the end of the Cold War, multiculturalism, American interventionism, the AIDS crisis, and early internet culture. Artists covered will include Felix Gonzalez-Torres, Kim Gordon, Mike Kelly, the Young British Artists, Gregg Bordowitz, Lorna Simpson, Zoe Leonard, Byron Kim, and Glenn Ligon. What is the relationship between art, popular culture, and history? How did the 1990s help shape our current culture?
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5

ARTHIST 440A: The Art Market

This seminar is designed to examine aspects of the art market in the current moment and since the mid 19th century. Participants will have an opportunity to engage with problems and perspectives that, until recently, have generally been overlooked or marginalized in narratives of the history of art. Each week, students will write a response to the readings to be shared in advance of the class meeting, and each week, discussion will be initiated by a different student. In individual research projects culminating in a seminar paper, students will be encouraged to focus on how the art market may have impacted the production, reception, and/or circulation of a work or works by a particular artist. 
Last offered: Spring 2014

ARTHIST 441: Overlooked/Understudied

This seminar focuses on overlooked artists and understudied artworks in the U.S. from the late 19th century to the present. Rather than reclaiming marginality for its own sake, we will consider how the practice of looking at the overlooked art changes familiar narratives of canonical art.
Last offered: Winter 2019

ARTHIST 442: Art History in the First Person

Course Description: This seminar considers the use of the first person voice in a wide range of writings about art, from fiction to criticism to scholarship. Insofar as graduate students have typically been discouraged from using the first person voice in their scholarly work, we will question the benefits and drawbacks of doing so in particular cases. To what ends have different writers put the first person voice and how do they integrate it with others strategies of written expression? How might we distinguish among different forms of speaking from the position of ¿I¿ in art-historical writing? What kind of ¿I¿ is at stake¿personal, professional, intellectual, imaginary, or otherwise?nnRequirements: Students will be required to attend all seminar meetings and participate actively in discussion. They will submit two types of writing assignments: The first, which each student will prepare on a rotating basis, will be a 2-page response to a selected reading that will serve to launch discussion of that text in seminar. The second, longer paper (12-15 pages) will involve original research on a selected object or exhibition and the writing of a paper that adopts the first person voice to some degree or explains its necessary rejection.
Terms: Win | Units: 5
Instructors: Meyer, R. (PI)

ARTHIST 445: What's not American about American Art?

This seminar focuses on American art as a history of migration (of people but also of visual objects) across national and continental boundaries. We examine trans-Atlantic and trans-Pacific dialogues and consider how anxieties about foreigners, immigrants, and political dissidents shaped American art and culture at particular moments in the 20th century. In the second half of the course, we consider a series of museum exhibitions that repositioned American art as a history of social conflict and exclusion.
Last offered: Spring 2013
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