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271 - 280 of 475 results for: all courses

LINGUIST 120: Introduction to Syntax

Grammatical constructions, primarily English, and their consequences for a general theory of language. Practical experience in forming and testing linguistic hypotheses, reading, and constructing rules.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-FR

LINGUIST 130A: Introduction to Semantics and Pragmatics (LINGUIST 230A)

Linguistic meaning and its role in communication. Topics include ambiguity, vagueness, presupposition, intonational meaning, and Grice's theory of conversational implicature. Applications to issues in politics, the law, philosophy, advertising, and natural language processing. Those who have not taken logic, such as PHIL 150 or 151, should also enroll in 130C. Pre- or corequisite: 120, 121, consent of instructor, or graduate standing in Linguistics.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-FR

LINGUIST 130B: Introduction to Lexical Semantics

Introduction to basic concepts and issues in the linguistic study of word meaning. The course focuses on the core semantic properties and internal organization of the four major word classes in natural languages: nouns, adjectives, prepositions, verbs. This course draws on material from English and other languages to illustrate the range of word meanings found across languages and to investigate possible word meanings. Prerequisites: Linguist 1 or equivalent or permission of the instructor. Linguist 130A is not a prerequisite for this course.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci

LINGUIST 140: Language Acquisition I (LINGUIST 240)

Processes of language acquisition in early childhood; stages in development; theoretical issues and research questions. Practical experience in data collection. Satisfies the WIM requirement for Linguistics if requested.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci

LINGUIST 144: Minds and Machines (PHIL 99, PSYCH 35, SYMSYS 100)

An overview of the interdisciplinary study of cognition, information, communication, and language, with an emphasis on foundational issues: What are minds? What is computation? What are rationality and intelligence? Can we predict human behavior? Can computers be truly intelligent? How do people and technology interact, and how might they do so in the future? Lectures focus on how the methods of philosophy, mathematics, empirical research, and computational modeling are used to study minds and machines. Undergraduates considering a major in symbolic systems should take this course as early as possible in their program of study.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-FR

LINGUIST 150: Language in Society

How language and society affect each other. Class, age, ethnic, and gender differences in speech. Prestige and stigma associated with different ways of speaking and the politics of language. The strategic use of language. Stylistic practice; how speakers use language to construct styles and adapt their language to different audiences and social contexts. Satisfies the WIM requirement for Linguistics if taken for 5units.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

LINGUIST 156: Language and Gender (FEMGEN 156X)

The role of language in the construction of gender, the maintenance of the gender order, and social change. Field projects explore hypotheses about the interaction of language and gender. No knowledge of linguistics required.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

LINGUIST 160: Introduction to Language Change

Principles of historical linguistics:, the nature of language change. Kinds and causes of change, variation and diffusion of changes through populations, differentiation of dialects and languages, determination and classification of historical relationships among languages, the reconstruction of ancestral languages and intermediate changes, parallels with cultural and genetic evolutionary theory, and implications of variation and change for the description and explanation of language in general. Prerequisite: introductory course in linguistics.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci
Instructors: Kiparsky, P. (PI)

LINGUIST 167: Languages of the World

The diversity of human languages, their sound systems, vocabularies, and grammars. Tracing historical relationships between languages and language families. Parallels with genetic evolutionary theory. Language policy, endangered languages and heritage languages. Classification of sign languages.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED

LINGUIST 191: Linguistics and the Teaching of English as a Second/Foreign Language (LINGUIST 291)

Methodology and techniques for teaching languages, using concepts from linguistics and second language acquisition theory and research. Focus is on teaching English, but most principles and techniques applicable to any language. Optional 1-unit seminar in computer-assisted language learning.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci
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