2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

151 - 160 of 475 results for: all courses

FEMGEN 181A: Gender in the Middle East: Iran, Turkey, and Egypt (ANTHRO 181A)

This course explores the construction of gender in the Middle East. Drawing on the historical, sociological and anthropological research in the region, the course aims to question the stereotypes about the subordination of Muslim women and to offer students a systematic reading and analytical discussion of the political, economic and cultural structures that inform gender relations and practices in the region. The course starts with an examination of early Islam and religious sources with regard to women¿s status, then moves on to nationalist and modernization movements in the 19th and 20th centuries, and finally explores women¿s and men¿s lives in contemporary Egypt, Turkey and Iran. In this framework, we will pay special attention to Islamist mobilizations, family and sexual relations, as well as women's changing livelihoods and labor.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI

FEMGEN 221B: The 'Woman Question' in Modern Russia (HISTORY 221B)

Russian radicals believed that the status of women provided the measure of freedom in a society and argued for the extension of rights to women as a basic principle of social progress. The social status and cultural representations of Russian women from the mid-19th century to the present. The arguments and actions of those who fought for women's emancipation in the 19th century, theories and policies of the Bolsheviks, and the reality of women's lives under them. How the status of women today reflects on the measure of freedom in post-Communist Russia.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-Gender

FEMGEN 258: Topics in the History of Sexuality: Sexual Violence in America (AMSTUD 258, CSRE 192E, FEMGEN 358, HISTORY 258, HISTORY 358)

This undergraduate/graduate colloquium explores recent historical interpretations of the history of sexuality, with a focus on sexual violence. The readings cover changing definitions and laws, cultural representations, and the role of gender, race, and age in the construction of rape and other forms of sexual violence. Topics include slavery; incest, seduction, and statutory rape reform; the racialization of rape and the anti-lynching movement; street harassment; men and boys as victims; war and conquest; and feminist responses to rape.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Freedman, E. (PI)

FEMGEN 260: Disability, Gender. & Identity (AMSTUD 260, FEMGEN 360, HUMBIO 141)

Course explores visible and invisible disabilities. focusing on issues of gender and identity. The course emphasizes psychological as well as physical health, cross-cultural variables, diversity of disability experiences, legal and political aspects, work and home accommodations, self-labeling, caretaking, stigma and passing, and the difference gender makes to how disabilities are experienced. Disabilities covered include blindness, multiple sclerosis, diabetes, arthritis, emotional and learning disabilities, and conditions requiring wheelchairs and other forms of physical assistance.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Krieger, S. (PI)

FEMGEN 123: Sex and Love in Modern U.S. Society (SOC 123, SOC 223)

Social influences on private intimate relations involving romantic love and sexuality. Topics include the sexual revolution, contraception, dating, hook-ups, cohabitation, sexual orientation, and changing cultural meanings of marriage, gender, and romantic love.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-Gender
Instructors: Fogarty, A. (PI)

FILMSTUD 115: Documentary Issues and Traditions (FILMSTUD 315)

Issues include objectivity/subjectivity, ethics, censorship, representation, reflexivity, responsibility to the audience, and authorial voice. Parallel focus on form and content.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-A-II

HISTORY 4N: A World History of Genocide (JEWISHST 4N)

Reviews the history of genocide from ancient times until the present. Defines genocide, both in legal and historical terms, and investigates its causes, consequences, and global dimensions. Issues of prevention, punishment, and interdiction. Main periods of concern are the ancient world, Spanish colonial conquest; early modern Asia; settler genocides in America, Australia, and Africa; the Armenian genocide and the Holocaust; genocide in communist societies; and late 20th century genocide.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Naimark, N. (PI)

HISTORY 10B: Survey of Early Modern Europe

(Same as HISTORY 110B. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 110B.) From 1350 to 1789, Europe went from being a provincial backwater to a new global center of power. This course surveys the profound changes of the period that shape our world today: the spread of humanism and science, religious reformation, new styles of warfare, the rise of capitalism and a new global economy, the emergence of the state, and revolution which sought to overthrow established governments.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI
Instructors: Stokes, L. (PI)

HISTORY 40: World History of Science

(Same as HISTORY 140. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 140.) The earliest developments in science, the prehistoric roots of technology, the scientific revolution, and global voyaging. Theories of human origins and the oldest known tools and symbols. Achievements of the Mayans, Aztecs, and native N. Americans. Science and medicine in ancient Greece, Egypt, China, Africa, and India. Science in medieval and Renaissance Europe and the Islamic world including changing cosmologies and natural histories. Theories of scientific growth and decay; how science engages other factors such as material culture and religions.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

HISTORY 41Q: Mad Women: Women and Mental Illness in U.S. History

Explores how gender and historical context have shaped the experience and treatment of mental illness in U.S. history. Why have women been the witches and hysterics of the past, and why have there historically been more women than men among the mentally ill? Topics include the relationship between historical ideas of femininity and insanity, the ways that notions of gender influence the definition and treatment of mental disorder, and the understanding of the historically embedded nature of medical ideas, diagnoses, and treatments.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Horn, M. (PI)
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints