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AMSTUD 251J: The End of American Slavery, 1776-1865 (AFRICAAM 251J, HISTORY 251J, HISTORY 351J)

How did the institution of American slavery come to an end? The story is more complex than most people know. This course examines the rival forces that fostered slavery's simultaneous contraction in the North and expansion in the South between 1776 and 1861. It also illuminates, in detail, the final tortuous path to abolition during the Civil War. Throughout, the course introduces a diverse collection of historical figures, including seemingly paradoxical ones, such as slaveholding southerners who professed opposition to slavery and non-slaveholding northerners who acted in ways that preserved it. Historical attitudes toward race are a central integrative theme.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Hammann, A. (PI)

AMSTUD 256E: The American Civil War (AFRICAAM 256E, HISTORY 256E)

What was it like to live in the United States during the Civil War? This course uses the lenses of racial/ethnic identity, gender, class, and geography (among others) to explore the breadth of human experience during this singular moment in American history. It illuminates the varied ways in which Americans, in the Union states and the Confederate states, struggled to move forward and to find meaning in the face of unprecedented division and destruction.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Hammann, A. (PI)

AMSTUD 261: Personal Narratives in Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies (FEMGEN 261, FEMGEN 361)

This course explores the contribution of personal narratives to knowledge in the field of feminist, gender, and sexuality studies. Each week, students do extensive readings of exemplary personal narratives that have contributed in substance and method to the field and that have opened up new areas of inquiry. These narratives deal especially with issues of individual and group identity; gender, sexuality, racial and ethnic diversity; and disability. Students select a topic of special interest to them to focus their readings and guide individual research during the quarter. The approach of the course is feminist, ethnographic, and welcoming of a variety of approaches to personal narrative. Instructor consent required; students apply at the first class meeting.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Krieger, S. (PI)

AMSTUD 268C: Poverty in America (CSRE 268C, HISTORY 268C, HISTORY 368C)

During the twentieth century, Americans launched numerous bold efforts to reduce poverty in the United States. Federal welfare policy, community-based programs, academic research, philanthropic charity, and grassroots activism committed time and resources to the cause, but poverty-- and inequality-- have persisted. Why? This seminar considers the origins, implementation, and consequences of these remedies, noting in particular how race, gender, citizenship, family composition, and geography have shaped the lives of those in poverty and the public and private responses to it.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Dunning, C. (PI)

AMSTUD 275B: History of Modern Mexico (CHILATST 275B, CSRE 275B, HISTORY 275B, HISTORY 375C)

Surveys the history of governance, resistance, and identity formation in Mexico from the nineteenth century to the present. Explores Mexico's historical struggles to achieve political stability, economic prosperity, and social justice and examines how regional, class, ethnic, and gender differences have figured prominently in the shaping of Mexican affairs. Topics include Mexico's wars and their legacies, the power of the state, violence and protest, debates over the meaning of "Mexicanness," youth culture, and the politics of indigenismo.
Last offered: Winter 2016 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

ANTHRO 1: Introduction to Cultural and Social Anthropology (ANTHRO 201)

This course introduces basic anthropological concepts and presents the discipline¿s distinctive perspective on society and culture. The power of this perspective is illustrated by exploring vividly-written ethnographic cases that show how anthropological approaches illuminate contemporary social and political issues in a range of different cultural sites.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

ANTHRO 1S: Introduction to Cultural and Social Anthropology (ANTHRO 101S)

This course introduces basic anthropological concepts and presents the discipline's distinctive perspective on society and culture. The power of this perspective is illustrated by exploring vividly-written ethnographic cases that show how anthropological approaches illuminate contemporary social and political issues in a range of different cultural sites.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

ANTHRO 3: Introduction to Archaeology (ARCHLGY 1)

Aims, methods, and data in the study of human society's development from early hunters through late prehistoric civilizations. Archaeological sites and remains characteristic of the stages of cultural development for selected geographic areas, emphasizing methods of data collection and analysis appropriate to each.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

ANTHRO 15: Sex and Gender

Commonality and diversity of gender roles in crosscultural perspective. Cultural, ecological, and evolutionary explanations for such diversity. Theory of the evolution of sex and gender, changing views about men's and women's roles in human evolution, conditions under which gender roles vary in contemporary societies, and issues surrounding gender equality, power, and politics.
Last offered: Autumn 2013 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

ANTHRO 16: Native Americans in the 21st Century: Encounters, Identity, and Sovereignty in Contemporary America (ANTHRO 116C, ARCHLGY 16, NATIVEAM 16)

What does it mean to be a Native American in the 21st century? Beyond traditional portrayals of military conquests, cultural collapse, and assimilation, the relationships between Native Americans and American society. Focus is on three themes leading to in-class moot court trials: colonial encounters and colonizing discourses; frontiers and boundaries; and sovereignty of self and nation. Topics include gender in native communities, American Indian law, readings by native authors, and Indians in film and popular culture.
Last offered: Spring 2017 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI
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