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741 - 750 of 940 results for: all courses

POLISCI 291: Political Institutions

This course focuses on the role of political institutions in shaping policy outcomes around the world, with special attention to the United States. Students will become familiar with a wide range of theoretical approaches to the study of institutions, and they will learn the basics of applied quantitative empirical analysis. Enrollment is restricted to Political Science Research Honors Track students.
Last offered: Winter 2016 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

POLISCI 292: Political Behavior

This research seminar will survey important topics in the study of mass political behavior including public opinion, political participation, partisanship and voting. Open only to students in the Political Science Research Honors Track.
Last offered: Winter 2016 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-SI

POLISCI 299A: Research Design

This course is designed to teach students how to design a research project. The course emphasizes the specification of testable hypotheses, the building of data sets, and the inferences from that may be drawn from that evidence.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Fouka, V. (PI)

PSYC 83: Addictions in our World: From Physiology to Human Behavior

Addiction is a powerful brain-based behavioral disorder that interferes with many lives. The National Survey on Drug Use and Health has estimated 21.5 million Americans aged 12 and older are classified as having a substance use disorder, an extraordinary 8.1% of the population. The field of mental health is advancing the understanding of this disorder through research, education, innovation and policy guidance. This class aims to help students better understand the struggles of addiction in our world by discussing many components involved in the disease including: physiology, psychology, treatment options, and the societal implications of addiction.nnStudents will engage in thought-provoking between psychology, neuroscience, and society. They will develop the knowledge-base and framework to critically evaluate the science behind addiction and how to apply this knowledge to address the addiction epidemic in our world. As technology advances, many new types of addiction are emerging, creating an additional urgent need to discuss the implications this burgeoning problem. This highly interactive seminar aims to engage the students in critical thinking didactics, activities and discussions that shape their understanding of the complexity inherent to the issues surrounding addiction, and increase the student¿s ability to more critically assimilate and interrogate information.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI, WAY-SMA

PSYC 286: Culture and Madness: Anthropological and Psychiatric Approaches to Mental Illness (ANTHRO 186, ANTHRO 286, HUMBIO 146)

Unusual mental phenomena have existed throughout history and across cultures. Taught by an anthropologist and psychiatrist, this course explores how different societies construct the notions of "madness": What are the boundaries between "normal" and "abnormal", reason and unreason, mind and body, diversity and disease? nnOptional: The course will be taught in conjunction with an optional two-unit discussion section or engaged learning component.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5

PSYCH 1: Introduction to Psychology

An introduction to the science of how people think, feel, and behave. We will explore such topics as intelligence, perception, memory, happiness, personality, culture, social influence, development, emotion, and mental illness. Students will learn about classic and cutting edge research, a range of methods, and discover how psychology informs our understanding of what it means to be human, addresses other fields, and offers solutions to important social problems.nnAn alternative version of the course, PSYCH 1L, is also offered for reduced (3) units, but does not count for major/minor requirements for Psychology or other disciplines. For more information on PSYCH 1 and PSYCH 1L, visit http://psychone.stanford.edu
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI, WAY-SMA

PSYCH 1L: Introduction to Psychology

A reduced-unit version of Stanford's popular Psych 1 class. An introduction to the science of how people think, feel, and behave. We will explore such topics as intelligence, perception, memory, happiness, personality, culture, social influence, development, emotion, and mental illness. Students will learn about classic and cutting edge research, a range of methods, and discover how psychology informs our understanding of what it means to be human, addresses other fields, and offers solutions to important social problems. nThe primary version of the course, PSYCH 1, is offered for 5 units and counts for major/minor requirements for Psychology and other disciplines. For more information on PSYCH 1 and PSYCH 1L, visit http://psychone.stanford.edu
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

PSYCH 7N: Learn to Intervene, Wisely

Do you ever look around and see ways that the world could be a better place, especially if people behaved a little differently? Do you wonder what prevents better outcomes? nnIn this seminar, we will examine social-psychological processes that lie behind diverse social problems, especially how people make sense of themselves, other people, or important situations, sometimes in pejorative ways that undermine outcomes. Then we will examine interventions that address critical processes to promote human flourishing. You'll have the opportunity to read and discuss classic and contemporary 'wise' psychological interventions such as: how a change in the sign on a hospital soap dispenser can increase soap use; how a change in survey items can raise voter turnout; how a change in a single question can improve dating relationships; and how reading-and-writing exercises that address students' beliefs about intelligence and belonging in school can improve achievement years into the future. In learning about this research, you will discover more about psychological processes, how basic research helps clarify these processes, how they contribute in complex field settings to social problems, and how they can be altered.nnAs you learn from past research, you'll have the opportunity to design your very own 'wise intervention' and to workshop others' efforts. You will identify a social problem on campus of interest to you, say: How can you reduce waste in the cafeteria? How can you get more people to take the stairs? How can you get people to hold more inclusive attitudes? Then you will identify a psychological process you think contributes to this problem, implement an intervention in the field and track the results. nnWhen you have completed this seminar, you will more fully understand the psychological aspect of social problems and how this can be addressed through rigorous research.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Walton, G. (PI)

PSYCH 7Q: Language Understanding by Children and Adults

How do we first learn to find meaning in strings of speech sounds? Understanding spoken language requires the rapid integration of acoustic information with linguistic knowledge and with conceptual knowledge based on experience with how things happen in the world. Topics include research on early development of language understanding and laboratory methods of how young children make sense of speech. Observations of preschool children and visits to Stanford laboratories. Might be repeatable for credit.
Last offered: Autumn 2012 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

PSYCH 8N: The New Longevity

Adult development from the perspective of life-span theory -- a conceptual framework that views development as a series of adaptations to physical, societal and individual resources and constraints. Students will learn about demographic and medical changes, ways that individuals typically change socially, emotionally and cognitively as they move through adulthood. An understanding of the conceptual foundations of the life-span approach and place aging of young people today in historical context.
Last offered: Winter 2015 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI
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