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751 - 760 of 1215 results for: all courses

HUMBIO 163: The Opioid Epidemic: Using Neuroscience to Inform Policy and Law

The opioid epidemic has become a national problem, killing 115 people per day in the United States, and contributing to the first decrease in life expectancy in this country for decades.This is an upper division undergraduate class that aims to help students understand the science of opiates, how opioid prescribing and availability led us to be in this place, and how that information might be used to create effective policy to reverse it. Students will engage didactic work and interactive discussions to stimulate critical thinking at the interface between psychology, psychiatry, addiction medicine, neuroscience, communication, law, and society. They will develop the knowledge-base and framework to critically evaluate the science behind opioid addiction and how to apply this knowledge to address the addiction epidemic. This highly interactive seminar aims to engage the students in critical thinking didactics, activities and discussions that shape their understanding of the complexity in more »
The opioid epidemic has become a national problem, killing 115 people per day in the United States, and contributing to the first decrease in life expectancy in this country for decades.This is an upper division undergraduate class that aims to help students understand the science of opiates, how opioid prescribing and availability led us to be in this place, and how that information might be used to create effective policy to reverse it. Students will engage didactic work and interactive discussions to stimulate critical thinking at the interface between psychology, psychiatry, addiction medicine, neuroscience, communication, law, and society. They will develop the knowledge-base and framework to critically evaluate the science behind opioid addiction and how to apply this knowledge to address the addiction epidemic. This highly interactive seminar aims to engage the students in critical thinking didactics, activities and discussions that shape their understanding of the complexity inherent to the issues surrounding addiction and increase the student's ability to more critically assimilate and interrogate information. Preference will be given to upperclassmen, especially in the HumBio program. Attendance at first class is mandatory. Enrollment limited to 20 by application only. Applications will be accepted on Sunday, March 7th at 12:00AM, consistent with the Spring Quarter enrollment. Applications will be due on Friday, March 12th at 5:00PM. Applications will be considered in the order received. Application: https://app.smartsheet.com/b/form/615264add6dc475da6da583f9a41a4b0. Prerequisites: Human Biology Core or PSYC 83 or consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

HUMBIO 171: The Death Penalty: Human Biology, Law, and Policy

Combines academic study with student participation in forensic research and case investigation, including DNA evidence, psychological and physiological development, mental and physical disabilities, and witness interviews. The philosophy, structure, and application of capital punishment in the U.S. Goal is to examine and challenge the issues involved in the death penalty from the perspective of involvement in a real case. Course not taught from a preconceived belief or political or philosophical agenda except to involve students in an intellectual challenge of policy and philosophy. Upper division course with preference given to upperclassmen.
Last offered: Winter 2017 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

HUMBIO 172B: Children, Youth, and the Law (PUBLPOL 172)

How the legal rights of children and adolescents in America are defined, protected, and enforced through the legal process within the context of their developmental needs and competing societal interests. Topics: origins and definitions of children's rights; adoption; custody; the juvenile justice system; education; freedom of speech; and sex. The class is interactive, using hypotheticals for discussion and analysis. A and B alternate; students may take one or both. Upper division course with preference given to upperclassmen.
Last offered: Winter 2020 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

HUMBIO 176A: Medical Anthropology (ANTHRO 82, ANTHRO 282)

Emphasis is on how health, illness, and healing are understood, experienced, and constructed in social, cultural, and historical contexts. Topics: biopower and body politics, gender and reproductive technologies, illness experiences, medical diversity and social suffering, and the interface between medicine and science.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI, GER:EC-GlobalCom
Instructors: Kohrman, M. (PI)

HUMCORE 127: Love, Loss, and Devotion in Indian Literature (COMPLIT 137, RELIGST 127)

Why are human cultures perennially preoccupied with love, and with what happens when it vanishes? Classical theorists in India have argued, at least, that love is the very foundation of aesthetic experience, and that love has something fundamental to teach us about the goals of human life and the nature of the divine. This course explores this deep preoccupation with love and longing for love through several influential works of courtly and devotional literature from medieval and early modern India. In dialogue with these classic works, we ask the following questions: How do we narrate the experience of love? What is the relationship between human love and love for the divine? Why does love, both human and divine, become lost or occluded? In other words, what is the meaning of suffering and loss, and how can it be overcome? This is the second of three courses in the South Asia track of the Humanities Core, dedicated to an exploration of some of the most enduring concepts and questions that South Asian cultures have wrestled with over the course of their history.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI, WAY-A-II
Instructors: Fisher, E. (PI)

HUMCORE 134: Freedom Fighters, Terrorists, and Social Justice Warriors: Protest and Decolonization in South Asia (RELIGST 118)

The South Asian region comprises the contemporary nations of India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Nepal, Bhutan, and the Maldives. Racially, linguistically, politically, religiously, and in every way diverse, this region has also experienced the challenge of European colonialism, the effects of global climate change, the impact of rapid industrialization and urbanization, and internal conflicts within and between nations. It is also a creatively and intellectually vibrant region in which principles of non-violent resistance, award winning arts and literature, stunning natural environments, and scientific discovery are integral and celebrated. How have South Asians engaged the rapid social change of the twentieth century with decolonization and regional conflicts? What artistic and literary formations emerged from and drove the freedom movements against colonial rule and the nation forming projects that ensued? How have globalization and internal debates about national identities shaped contemporary South Asian societies?
Last offered: Spring 2021 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

HUMRTS 101: Cross-Disciplinary Perspectives on Human Rights Theory and Practice

This course will introduce students to the philosophical and historical foundations for the modern concept of human rights, as well as the international and domestic legal frameworks currently in force to protect and promote these rights. Students will learn about the broad landscape of institutions responsible for defining and enforcing human rights from scholars who study the institutions, and practitioners who have worked inside them. Throughout the quarter we will read and discuss critical scholarship about the gap between the promises and aspirations of international human rights covenants, and the ongoing realities of widespread oppression, exploitation, and atrocity happening around the world. We will welcome practitioners as well as guest faculty from departments across the university whose teaching and research touches on aspects of human rights within their respective fields of expertise. Throughout the course, we will explore how distinct perspectives, assumptions, and vocab more »
This course will introduce students to the philosophical and historical foundations for the modern concept of human rights, as well as the international and domestic legal frameworks currently in force to protect and promote these rights. Students will learn about the broad landscape of institutions responsible for defining and enforcing human rights from scholars who study the institutions, and practitioners who have worked inside them. Throughout the quarter we will read and discuss critical scholarship about the gap between the promises and aspirations of international human rights covenants, and the ongoing realities of widespread oppression, exploitation, and atrocity happening around the world. We will welcome practitioners as well as guest faculty from departments across the university whose teaching and research touches on aspects of human rights within their respective fields of expertise. Throughout the course, we will explore how distinct perspectives, assumptions, and vocabulary of particular disciplinary communities affect the way scholars and practitioners trained in these fields approach, understand, and employ human rights concepts. HUMRTS 101 fulfills the gateway course requirement for the Minor in Human Rights, and is offered once per year, winter quarter. No prior knowledge or formal human rights education is required of students enrolling in this introductory course. Students of all years and majors are welcome to join. Students should enroll in Section 01 of the course for in-person instruction Tu/Th 2:45-4:45pm. Enrollment in Section 02 is available only by special consent of the instructor, for students with special circumstances who need to complete HUMRTS 101 for the Minor, but cannot regularly attend the class in person as scheduled for Section 01. Students enrolled in Section 02 will complete identical curriculum, and will engage with classmates from Section 02 on a single Canvas site, but will have asynchronous and remote scheduling options for lectures. These same asynchronous and remote options can also be made available to Section 01 students (if/when needed, at discrete times throughout the quarter) in the event of COVID-related disruptions to class (e.g. instructor illness, student quarantine).
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI, WAY-ER
Instructors: Van Tuyl, P. (PI)

HUMRTS 106: Human Rights in Comparative and Historical Perspective (CLASSICS 116, ETHICSOC 106)

This course examines core human rights issues and concepts from a comparative and historical perspective. In the beginning part of the course we will focus on current debates about the universality of human rights norms, considering the foundation of the international human rights regime and claims that it is a product of western colonialism, imperialism, or hegemony. We will then discuss a series of issues where the debates about universality are particularly acute: gender inequality and discrimination, sexual violence, child marriage and forced marriage more generally, and other related topics. We will also consider the way in which issues of gender-based violence arise in the context of internal and international conflicts.
Last offered: Summer 2021 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER, WAY-SI

HUMRTS 109: Slavery, human trafficking, and the moral order: ancient and modern (CLASSICS 118, CLASSICS 218)

Slavery and trafficking in persons in the Greco-Roman world were legal and ubiquitous; today slavery is illegal in most states and regarded as a grave violation of human rights and as a crime against humanity under international law. In recent trends, human trafficking has been re-conceptualized as a form of "modern day slavery. " Despite more than a century since the success of the abolition movement, slavery and trafficking continue in the 21st century on a global scale. The only book for the course is: Peter Garnsey, Ideas of Slavery from Aristotle to Augustine, Cambridge University Press
Last offered: Spring 2021 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

HUMRTS 112: Human Trafficking: Historical, Legal, and Medical Perspectives (CSRE 105C, FEMGEN 105C, HISTORY 105C, INTNLREL 105C)

(Same as HISTORY 5C. History majors and others taking 5 units, enroll in 105C.) Interdisciplinary approach to understanding the extent and complexity of the global phenomenon of human trafficking, especially for forced prostitution, labor exploitation, and organ trade, focusing on human rights violations and remedies. Provides a historical context for the development and spread of human trafficking. Analyzes the current international and domestic legal and policy frameworks to combat trafficking and evaluates their practical implementation. Examines the medical, psychological, and public health issues involved. Uses problem-based learning. Required weekly 50-min. discussion section, time TBD. Students interested in service learning should consult with the instructor and will enroll in an additional course.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
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