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261 - 270 of 474 results for: all courses

HISTORY 4N: A World History of Genocide (JEWISHST 4N)

Reviews the history of genocide from ancient times until the present. Defines genocide, both in legal and historical terms, and investigates its causes, consequences, and global dimensions. Issues of prevention, punishment, and interdiction. Main periods of concern are the ancient world, Spanish colonial conquest; early modern Asia; settler genocides in America, Australia, and Africa; the Armenian genocide and the Holocaust; genocide in communist societies; and late 20th century genocide.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Naimark, N. (PI)

HISTORY 36N: Gay Autobiography (FEMGEN 36N)

Preference to freshmen. Gender, identity, and solidarity as represented in nine autobiographies: Isherwood, Ackerley, Duberman, Monette, Louganis, Barbin, Cammermeyer, Gingrich, and Lorde. To what degree do these writers view sexual orientation as a defining feature of their selves? Is there a difference between the way men and women view identity? What politics follow from these writers' experiences?
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED
Instructors: Robinson, P. (PI)

HISTORY 39: Modern Britain and the British Empire

(Same as HISTORY 139. History majors and others taking 5 units, register in 139.) From American Independence to the latest war in Iraq. Topics include: the rise of the modern British state and economy; imperial expansion and contraction; the formation of class, gender, and national identities; mass culture and politics; the world wars; and contemporary racial politics. Focus is on questions of decline, the fortunes and contradictions of British liberalism in an era of imperialism, and the weight of the past in contemporary Britain.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Satia, P. (PI)

HISTORY 41Q: Mad Women: Women and Mental Illness in U.S. History

Explores how gender and historical context have shaped the experience and treatment of mental illness in U.S. history. Why have women been the witches and hysterics of the past, and why have there historically been more women than men among the mentally ill? Topics include the relationship between historical ideas of femininity and insanity, the ways that notions of gender influence the definition and treatment of mental disorder, and the understanding of the historically embedded nature of medical ideas, diagnoses, and treatments.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Horn, M. (PI)

HISTORY 44: History of Women and Gender in Science, Medicine and Engineering

(Same as HISTORY 144. Majors and others taking 5 units, enroll in HISTORY 144.) Men's and women's roles in science, medicine, and engineering over the past 200 years with a focus on the present. What efforts are underway globally to transform research institutions so that both men's and women's careers can flourish? How have science and medicine studied and defined males and females? How can we harness the creative power of gender analysis to enhance knowledge and spark innovation?
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

HISTORY 47: History of South Africa (AFRICAAM 47)

(Same as HISTORY 147. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 147.) Introduction, focusing particularly on the modern era. Topics include: precolonial African societies; European colonization; the impact of the mineral revolution; the evolution of African and Afrikaner nationalism; the rise and fall of the apartheid state; the politics of post-apartheid transformation; and the AIDS crisis.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Campbell, J. (PI)

HISTORY 48Q: South Africa: Contested Transitions (AFRICAAM 48Q)

Preference to sophomores. The inauguration of Nelson Mandela as president in May 1994 marked the end of an era and a way of life for S. Africa. The changes have been dramatic, yet the legacies of racism and inequality persist. Focus: overlapping and sharply contested transitions. Who advocates and opposes change? Why? What are their historical and social roots and strategies? How do people reconstruct their society? Historical and current sources, including films, novels, and the Internet.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI, Writing 2
Instructors: Samoff, J. (PI)

HISTORY 50C: The United States in the Twentieth Century

(Same as HISTORY 150C. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 150C.) Major political, economic, social, and diplomatic developments in the U.S. Themes: the economic and social role of government (Progressive, New Deal, Great Society, and Reagan-Bush eras); ethnic and racial minorities in society (mass immigration at the turn of the century and since 1965, the civil rights era of the 50s and 60s); the changing status of women since WW II; shifting ideological bases, institutional structures, and electoral characteristics of the political system (New Deal and post-Vietnam); determinants of foreign policy in WW I and II, and the Cold War.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

HISTORY 54N: African American Women's Lives (AFRICAAM 54N, AMSTUD 54N, CSRE 54N, FEMGEN 54N)

Preference to freshmen. The everyday lives of African American women in 19th- and 20th-century America in comparative context of histories of European, Hispanic, Asian, and Native American women. Primary sources including personal journals, memoirs, music, literature, and film, and historical texts. Topics include slavery and emancipation, labor and leisure, consumer culture, social activism, changing gender roles, and the politics of sexuality.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

HISTORY 55Q: The Origins of the Modern American City, 1865-1920 (AMSTUD 25Q, URBANST 25Q)

Are we living in a new Gilded Age? To answer this question, we go back to the original Gilded Age, as well as its successor, the Progressive Era. How did urban Americans around the turn of the twentieth century deal with stark inequalities of class, race, ethnicity, gender, and sexuality? And what can we learn from their struggles for our own time? Students use primary and secondary sources in digital and print formats. Possible field trip to San Francisco.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Kahan, M. (PI)
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