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271 - 280 of 543 results for: all courses

FEMGEN 223X: The Politics of Gender in the United States (POLISCI 223)

Gender is one of the most recognizable and important identities in daily life. Yet it has been paid scant attention by political scientists in terms of its role on access to political power, opinion formation, group identity politics, election outcomes, and political representation. This class provides a survey of the literature on gender in American politics. We begin with the interdisciplinary research on the social construction of gender to understand what gender is and is not. Throughout the course we will use these theories to analyze and critique the approaches of quantitative research on gender politics.
Last offered: Spring 2015 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED

FEMGEN 226A: Queer Literature and Film (COMPLIT 226A)

Close analysis of major works of LGBTQ literature, film, and visual art from the 1890s to today. Students will gain deeper knowledge and appreciation of historical and contemporary forms of queer representation in various national literatures, film, and visual art; understand relevant social and political debates; and gain a basic knowledge of feminist and queer theory. Course will include an optional online component to reach out to the public (class website queerlitfilm.wordpress.com, social media).
Last offered: Autumn 2013 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

FEMGEN 236: Literature and Transgression (COMPLIT 236)

Close reading and analysis of erotic-sexual and aesthetic-stylistic transgression in selected works by such authors as Baudelaire, Wilde, Flaubert, Rachilde, Schnitzler, Kafka, Joyce, Barnes, Eliot, Bataille, Burroughs, Thomas Mann, Kathy Acker, as well as in recent digital literature and online communities. Along with understanding the changing cultural, social, and political contexts of what constitutes "transgression" or censorship, students will gain knowledge of influential theories of transgression and conceptual limits by Foucault, Blanchot, and contemporary queer and feminist writers.
Last offered: Spring 2015 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

FEMGEN 258: Sexual Violence in America (AFRICAAM 192, AMSTUD 258, CSRE 192E, FEMGEN 358, HISTORY 258, HISTORY 358)

This undergraduate/graduate colloquium explores the history of sexual violence in America, with particular attention to the intersections of gender and race in the construction of rape. We discuss the changing definitions of sexual violence in law and in cultural representations from early settlement through the late-twentieth century, including slavery, wartime and prison rape, the history of lynching and anti-lynching movements, and feminist responses to sexual violence. In addition to introducing students to the literature on sexual violence, the course attempts to teach critical skills in the analysis of secondary and primary historical texts. Students write short weekly reading responses and a final paper; no final exam; fifth unit research or CEL options.nnLimited enrollment, permission of instructor required. Submit application form (available on Coursework) by Dec. 1, 2015 and indicate interest in CEL option. Priority admission to History, FGSS, CSRE, AFRICAAM, and AMSTUD declared majors and minors.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Freedman, E. (PI)

FEMGEN 260: Women and Disabilities (AMSTUD 260, FEMGEN 360)

Course explores visible and invisible disabilities, women's psychological as well as physical health, and disabled women¿s identities and diversity of experiences. Disabilities covered include blindness, multiple sclerosis, diabetes, arthritis, emotional and learning disabilities, and conditions requiring wheelchairs and other forms of assistance. We deal with issues such as who identifies as disabled, social and political dimensions, self-labeling, caretaking, stigma and passing, and the difference gender makes to how disabilities are experienced. Course uses a personal approach and readings draw from first-person accounts by women. nn*Instructor Consent Required
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

FEMGEN 272E: Theories of Citizenship and Sovereignty in a Transnational Context (AMSTUD 272E, CHILATST 172, CSRE 172H, HISTORY 272E, HISTORY 372E)

This course explores the multiple meanings of citizenship and the ways in which they change when examined using different geographic scales (from the local to the transnational). The course will pair theoretical readings on citizenship with case studies that focus on North America. Topics include: definitions of citizenship; the interrelation of ideas of citizenship with those of race, ethnicity, gender, and sexuality; the relationship between sovereignty and territoriality; human and civil rights; and immigration.
Last offered: Autumn 2014 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

FEMGEN 293B: Queer History in Comparative Perspective (FEMGEN 393B, HISTORY 293B, HISTORY 393B)

Comparative history of homoerotic desire, relations, and identity through scholarship on different historical periods and parts of the world: the classical Mediterranean, early modern European cities, late imperial and modern China, Tokugawa and modern Japan, and the U.S.
Last offered: Spring 2015 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

FEMGEN 295J: Chinese Women's History (CHINLIT 295J, HISTORY 295J)

The lives of women in the last 1,000 years of Chinese history. Focus is on theoretical questions fundamental to women's studies. How has the category of woman been shaped by culture and history? How has gender performance interacted with bodily disciplines and constraints such as medical, reproductive, and cosmetic technologies? How relevant is the experience of Western women to women elsewhere? By what standards should liberation be defined?
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Sommer, M. (PI)

FEMST 173: Gender and Higher Education: National and International Perspectives (EDUC 173, EDUC 273, SOC 173, SOC 273)

This course examines the ways in which higher education structures and policies affect females, males, and students in relation to each other and how changes in those structures and policies improve experiences for females and males similarly or differently. Students are expected to gain an understanding of theories and perspectives from the social sciences relevant to an understanding of the role of higher education in relation to structures of gender differentiation and hierarchy. Topics include undergraduate and graduate education; identity and sexuality; gender and science; gender and faculty; and the development of feminist scholarship and pedagogy. Attention is paid to how these issues are experienced by women and men in the United States, including people of color, and by academics throughout the world, and how these have changed over time.
Last offered: Spring 2013 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

FEMST 210: Queer Almodovar (ILAC 210)

Focus on the representation of non-normative sexualities and genders in films by Pedro Almodóvar, one of the most recognizable auteur directors in Europe today. Analysis of his hybrid and eclectic visual style complemented by critical and theoretical readings in queer studies. Taught in English.
Last offered: Spring 2013 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED
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