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101 - 110 of 586 results for: all courses

ARTHIST 1A: Introduction to the Visual Arts: Prehistoric through Medieval (CLASSICS 56)

A survey of the art and architecture from the cave paintings of Lascaux to the Gothic Cathedrals of France; the material is organized both chronologically and thematically and covers a multiplicity of religions: pagan, Christian, and Islamic.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

ARTHIST 90: Indigenous Cultural Heritage: Protection, Practice, Repatriation (ARTHIST 490A)

This new interdisciplinary seminar explores challenges and avenues for furthering protection of the cultural heritage rights enshrined in the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP). Using an innovative combination of in-class lectures and videos of interviews with renowned experts, including Indigenous leaders, scholars, artists and performers and museum professionals from around the world, this seminar will analyze current and potential tribal, domestic and international legal and ethical frameworks for indigenous cultural heritage protection and repatriation. Among other subjects, we will discuss and problematize: the impact of colonialism, urbanization and other political, legal, economic, religious and cultural forces on understandings and definitions of "indigenous" and "cultural heritage"; the development of international law relating to Indigenous peoples¿ cultural rights; tribal and domestic heritage protection and repatriation laws/initiatives including the 1990 US Indian Arts and Crafts Act and Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act; past and present Western museum practices relating to display, preservation, provenance research and repatriation of Indigenous peoples' cultural material; the meaning of repatriation to Indigenous peoples and other stakeholders; and resolving repatriation disputes, including by alternative dispute resolution (ADR) processes. While case studies will relate primarily to Indigenous peoples of North America, including the Arizona Hopi and Northwest Coast First Nations, comparisons will be drawn with the situation of Indigenous peoples in other regions, such as Oceania and Russia. The overall seminar experience will involve discussions of lectures and video content, assigned readings, a class visit to the Cantor Center Native Americas collection, and visits to our classroom by renowned experts, including Dr. Morten Rasmussen, who participated in the recent DNA analysis of Kennewick Man/The Ancient One. Students who have taken this course are eligible to join a guided weekend trip to Hopi territory tentatively planned for Spring Quarter 2016. Elements used in grading: class participation, attendance and a final project (one-day take-home exam; or research paper or film project with instructor's consent). Registration: Students may seek the instructor's consent via email (sjdenant@stanford.edu).
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED
Instructors: Jessiman, S. (PI)

ARTHIST 105B: Medieval Journeys: Tales of Devotion and Discovery (DLCL 123)

This course explores the experience and imagination of medieval journeys through interdisciplinary, cross-cultural, and skills-based approaches. As a foundations class, this survey of medieval culture engages with an array of written texts from the period. Narratives of medieval journeys are studied across a wide range of categories, including pilgrimages, crusades, quests, and sagas. The journey as metaphor, along with the resulting and very real cultural interactions, will provide a main focus for examining this rich tradition of literature. Students will have the opportunity to produce a creative project that brings medieval ideas about travel into dialogue with modern conceptions. The course will satisfy the Ways-Creative Expression requirement as well as one of the following two: Ways-Analytical Interpretive or Ways-Engaging Difference.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-CE, WAY-ED
Instructors: Whobrey, B. (PI)

ARTHIST 106B: What Do Medieval Images Want? Theories of the Image in Byzantium, Islam, and the Latin West (ARTHIST 306B)

What is an image? The medieval response was tied to religious identity. At the core of the debate was whether the image was just a mimetic representation or a living entity: matter imbued with divine spirit. Byzantium, Islam, and the Latin West each developed their own positions and used it as a platform for political legitimacy. We will study the development of the medieval image theories by focusing on specific monuments and objects and by reading both primary sources in translation and current scholarly interpretations.
| UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

ARTHIST 145: Culture Wars: Art and Social Conflict in the USA, 1890-1950 (AMSTUD 145M, ARTHIST 345, FEMGEN 145)

This course examines social conflicts and political controversies in American culture through the lens of visual art and photography. We consider how visual images both reflect and participate in the social and political life of the nation and how the terms of citizenship have been represented¿and, at times, contested¿by artists throughout the first half of the 20th century. The class explores the relation between American art and the body politic by focusing on issues of poverty, war, censorship, consumerism, class identity, and racial division.
Last offered: Spring 2014 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

ARTHIST 162B: Art and Social Criticism (AMSTUD 102, CSRE 102A)

Contemporary visual artists have long been in the forefront of social criticism in America and their key works have become anchors for discourses on racism, sexism, economic inequality, and immigrant rights. We will consider political art by artists such as ACT-UP, Judy Chicago, Fred Wilson, Guerilla Girls, Ai Weiwei and many others that raises social awareness, inspires social change and galvanizes activism. What makes their art enduring social criticism? How have they contributed to our understanding of American history?
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED
Instructors: Hertz, B. (PI)

ARTHIST 178: Ethnicity and Dissent in United States Art and Literature (AMSTUD 178, ARTHIST 378)

The role of the visual arts of the U.S. in the construction and contesting of racial, class, and gender hierarchies. Focus is on artists and writers from the 18th century to 1990s. How power, domination, and resistance work historically. Topics include: minstrelsy and the invention of race; mass culture and postmodernity; hegemony and language; memory and desire; and the borderlands.
Last offered: Spring 2004 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

ARTHIST 188B: From Shanghai Modern to Global Contemporary: Frontiers of Modern Chinese Art

Chinese artistic engagements with international arenas and with the cultural politics of modernity, from the late 19th century to the present. Topics will include Shanghai modernity and public media; artistic reform and political activism at the end of empire; competition between national style painting and international modernisms; politicized arts of resistance and revolution; post-Mao era experimental and avant-garde movements; transnational careers and exhibition circuits.
Last offered: Winter 2015 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

ARTHIST 189C: Global Currents: Early Modern Art Enterprises, Economies, and Imaginaries (ARTHIST 389C)

Episodes of global artistic exchange from the 16th to 19th centuries involving commodities (porcelains and textiles), technologies (printmaking, perspective, and cartography), and imaginaries (Chinoiserie, East Asian Occidenteries, Orientalism, Japonisme). The role of enterprises, institutions, and power relations in artistic economies, from the Portuguese Empire, Jesuit mission networks and East India Companies to imperialist systems.
Last offered: Spring 2015 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

ARTHIST 207C: Phenomenology and Aesthetics in Medieval Art (ARTHIST 407C)

This course explores the phenomenal aspects of the medieval image and space such as glitter, shadow, smoke, reverberation and how these presence effects were conceptualized in medieval culture as animation. Focus is on a select group of monuments as well as engagement with medieval objects at the Cantor Art Museum and the facsimiles of medieval manuscripts kept at the Art Library and Special Collections. Among the monuments we will study are the Alhambra in Spain, the Apocalypse MSS, the Cantigas of Alfonso X, the Byzantine Joshua Roll, the Homiles of the Monk Kokkinobaphos, the Ashburnhamensis Pentateuch, and the Rossano Gospels.
Last offered: Winter 2015 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED
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