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ANTHRO 186: Culture and Madness (ANTHRO 286)

'Madness' lends insight into the construction of the normal and abnormal; the boundaries of reason and unreason; the epistemological relation of mind and body, and the management of difference and disease. Taking an interdisciplinary perspective, this course explores the fundamental questions madness poses to subjectivity, culture and modernity.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

ARCHLGY 16: Native Americans in the 21st Century: Encounters, Identity, and Sovereignty in Contemporary America (ANTHRO 16, ANTHRO 116C, NATIVEAM 16)

What does it mean to be a Native American in the 21st century? Beyond traditional portrayals of military conquests, cultural collapse, and assimilation, the relationships between Native Americans and American society. Focus is on three themes leading to in-class moot court trials: colonial encounters and colonizing discourses; frontiers and boundaries; and sovereignty of self and nation. Topics include gender in native communities, American Indian law, readings by native authors, and Indians in film and popular culture.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Wilcox, M. (PI)

ARCHLGY 113B: Religious Practices in Archaeological Cultures (ANTHRO 113B, ANTHRO 213B)

According to Hawkes (1954), religion or ideology is the most difficult part of social life to access archaeologically. Luckily, not all scholars agree; according to Fogelin (2008) 'religion is not something people think about, but something people do¿. Thus, archaeology, an inherently multidisciplinary subject that studies material culture, is well suited to delve into religion and its underpinnings.nThis course will explore religious practices, as they can be defined and interpreted from archaeological contexts spanning the Paleolithic to historic periods. Definitions of religion differ from author to author but they mostly agree that religion is a fully integrated and thus integral part of human social life. Politics, economics, identity and social class influence religion, and religion influences how these forces play out in society. Thus, the course will also examine the significance of ritual and religion in a variety of social contexts.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

ARCHLGY 135: Constructing National History in East Asian Archaeology (ARCHLGY 235, CHINGEN 118, CHINGEN 218)

Archaeological studies in contemporary East Asia share a common concern, to contribute to building a national narrative and cultural identity. This course focuses on case studies from China, Korea, and Japan, examining the influence of particular social-political contexts, such as nationalism, on the practice of archaeology in modern times.
Last offered: Spring 2015 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

ARCHLGY 138: Economic Archaeology: Investigating Production, Distribution, and Exchange in the Past (ARCHLGY 238)

This seminar is an exploration of archaeological approaches to the study of economic life in ancient, historical, and recent times. In-depth discussions of ¿economy¿¿and comparison of different approaches to the subject¿will ground examination of economic archaeology¿s unique role, its contributions to the discipline, and its defining characteristics. Selected readings will: (1) train students in essential theoretical and intellectual background, (2) critically explore current research, and (3) furnish a comparative perspective on the role of economy in archaeology.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Greene, A. (PI)

ARCHLGY 140: Post-Socialist Heritages: memorialisation, past mastering and nostalgia in Eurasia (ARCHLGY 240, REES 240)

The post-Soviet story is far from resolved! While national identities and geopolitical alliances are being (re)negotiated across Eurasia, unresolved atrocities continue to reopen old wounds. Within this process the past is skillfully embraced to support and sustain conflicting political discourses. Drawing on a variety of highly topical case studies this course will explore the main dynamics and historically entrenched structures that define how the past plays out in the present since the disintegration of the Soviet Empire.
Last offered: Spring 2015 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

ARTHIST 1A: Introduction to the Visual Arts: Prehistoric through Medieval (CLASSICS 56)

A survey of the art and architecture from the cave paintings of Lascaux to the Gothic Cathedrals of France; the material is organized both chronologically and thematically and covers a multiplicity of religions: pagan, Christian, and Islamic.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

ARTHIST 90: Indigenous Cultural Heritage: Protection, Practice, Repatriation (ARTHIST 490A)

This new interdisciplinary seminar explores challenges and avenues for furthering protection of the cultural heritage rights enshrined in the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP). Using an innovative combination of in-class lectures and videos of interviews with renowned experts, including Indigenous leaders, scholars, artists and performers and museum professionals from around the world, this seminar will analyze current and potential tribal, domestic and international legal and ethical frameworks for indigenous cultural heritage protection and repatriation. Among other subjects, we will discuss and problematize: the impact of colonialism, urbanization and other political, legal, economic, religious and cultural forces on understandings and definitions of "indigenous" and "cultural heritage"; the development of international law relating to Indigenous peoples¿ cultural rights; tribal and domestic heritage protection and repatriation laws/initiatives including the 1990 US Indian Arts and Crafts Act and Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act; past and present Western museum practices relating to display, preservation, provenance research and repatriation of Indigenous peoples' cultural material; the meaning of repatriation to Indigenous peoples and other stakeholders; and resolving repatriation disputes, including by alternative dispute resolution (ADR) processes. While case studies will relate primarily to Indigenous peoples of North America, including the Arizona Hopi and Northwest Coast First Nations, comparisons will be drawn with the situation of Indigenous peoples in other regions, such as Oceania and Russia. The overall seminar experience will involve discussions of lectures and video content, assigned readings, a class visit to the Cantor Center Native Americas collection, and visits to our classroom by renowned experts, including Dr. Morten Rasmussen, who participated in the recent DNA analysis of Kennewick Man/The Ancient One. Students who have taken this course are eligible to join a guided weekend trip to Hopi territory tentatively planned for Spring Quarter 2016. Elements used in grading: class participation, attendance and a final project (one-day take-home exam; or research paper or film project with instructor's consent). Registration: Students may seek the instructor's consent via email (sjdenant@stanford.edu).
Terms: Aut | Units: 2 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED
Instructors: Jessiman, S. (PI)

ARTHIST 105B: Medieval Journeys: Tales of Devotion and Discovery (DLCL 123)

This course explores the experience and imagination of medieval journeys through interdisciplinary, cross-cultural, and skills-based approaches. As a foundations class, this survey of medieval culture engages with an array of written texts from the period. Narratives of medieval journeys are studied across a wide range of categories, including pilgrimages, crusades, quests, and sagas. The journey as metaphor, along with the resulting and very real cultural interactions, will provide a main focus for examining this rich tradition of literature. Students will have the opportunity to produce a creative project that brings medieval ideas about travel into dialogue with modern conceptions. The course will satisfy the Ways-Creative Expression requirement as well as one of the following two: Ways-Analytical Interpretive or Ways-Engaging Difference.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-CE, WAY-ED
Instructors: Whobrey, B. (PI)

ARTHIST 106B: What Do Medieval Images Want? Theories of the Image in Byzantium, Islam, and the Latin West (ARTHIST 306B)

What is an image? The medieval response was tied to religious identity. At the core of the debate was whether the image was just a mimetic representation or a living entity: matter imbued with divine spirit. Byzantium, Islam, and the Latin West each developed their own positions and used it as a platform for political legitimacy. We will study the development of the medieval image theories by focusing on specific monuments and objects and by reading both primary sources in translation and current scholarly interpretations.
| UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED
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