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271 - 280 of 513 results for: all courses

GLOBAL 250: Bollywood and Beyond: An Introduction to Indian Film (COMPLIT 247, FILMSTUD 250B)

A broad engagement with Indian cinema: its relationship with Indian politics, history, and economics; its key thematic concerns and forms; and its adaptation of and response to global cinematic themes, genres, and audiences. Locating the films within key critical and theoretical debates and scholarship on Indian and world cinemas. Goal is to open up what is often seen as a dauntingly complex region, especially for those who are interested in but unfamiliar with its histories and cultural forms.
| UG Reqs: GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

HISTORY 1A: Global History: The Ancient World (CLASSICS 76)

This course examines the emergence of "world empires"-- the first way of constituting a world-- in four regions of the eastern hemisphere from the first millennium BCE to the year 900 CE. It will study the pivotal role of cities, the importance of rulers, the incorporation of diverse peoples, and how the states that followed their collapse constituted new world orders through combining imitation of the vanished empire with the elaboration of the new "world religions."
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

HISTORY 1B: Global History: The Early Modern World, 1300 to 1800

Topics include early globalization and cross-cultural exchanges; varying and diverse cultural formations in different parts of the world; the growth and interaction of empires and states; the rise of capitalism and the economic divergence of "the west"; changes in the nature of technology, including military and information technologies; migration of ideas and people (including the slave-trade); disease, climate, and environmental change over time. Designed to accommodate beginning students, non-majors, and more advanced history students
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

HISTORY 4N: A World History of Genocide (JEWISHST 4N)

Reviews the history of genocide from ancient times until the present. Defines genocide, both in legal and historical terms, and investigates its causes, consequences, and global dimensions. Issues of prevention, punishment, and interdiction. Main periods of concern are the ancient world, Spanish colonial conquest; early modern Asia; settler genocides in America, Australia, and Africa; the Armenian genocide and the Holocaust; genocide in communist societies; and late 20th century genocide.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Naimark, N. (PI)

HISTORY 36N: Gay Autobiography (FEMGEN 36N)

Preference to freshmen. Gender, identity, and solidarity as represented in nine autobiographies: Isherwood, Ackerley, Duberman, Monette, Louganis, Barbin, Cammermeyer, Gingrich, and Lorde. To what degree do these writers view sexual orientation as a defining feature of their selves? Is there a difference between the way men and women view identity? What politics follow from these writers' experiences?
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED
Instructors: Robinson, P. (PI)

HISTORY 39: Modern Britain and the British Empire

(Same as HISTORY 139. History majors and others taking 5 units, register in 139.) From American Independence to the latest war in Iraq. Topics include: the rise of the modern British state and economy; imperial expansion and contraction; the formation of class, gender, and national identities; mass culture and politics; the world wars; and contemporary racial politics. Focus is on questions of decline, the fortunes and contradictions of British liberalism in an era of imperialism, and the weight of the past in contemporary Britain.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Satia, P. (PI)

HISTORY 40: World History of Science

(Same as HISTORY 140. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 140.) The earliest developments in science, the prehistoric roots of technology, the scientific revolution, and global voyaging. Theories of human origins and the oldest known tools and symbols. Achievements of the Mayans, Aztecs, and native N. Americans. Science and medicine in ancient Greece, Egypt, China, Africa, and India. Science in medieval and Renaissance Europe and the Islamic world including changing cosmologies and natural histories. Theories of scientific growth and decay; how science engages other factors such as material culture and religions.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

HISTORY 41Q: Mad Women: Women and Mental Illness in U.S. History

Explores how gender and historical context have shaped the experience and treatment of mental illness in U.S. history. Why have women been the witches and hysterics of the past, and why have there historically been more women than men among the mentally ill? Topics include the relationship between historical ideas of femininity and insanity, the ways that notions of gender influence the definition and treatment of mental disorder, and the understanding of the historically embedded nature of medical ideas, diagnoses, and treatments.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Horn, M. (PI)

HISTORY 44: History of Women and Gender in Science, Medicine and Engineering

(Same as HISTORY 144. Majors and others taking 5 units, enroll in HISTORY 144.) Men's and women's roles in science, medicine, and engineering over the past 200 years with a focus on the present. What efforts are underway globally to transform research institutions so that both men's and women's careers can flourish? How have science and medicine studied and defined males and females? How can we harness the creative power of gender analysis to enhance knowledge and spark innovation?
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

HISTORY 47: History of South Africa (AFRICAAM 47)

(Same as HISTORY 147. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 147.) Introduction, focusing particularly on the modern era. Topics include: precolonial African societies; European colonization; the impact of the mineral revolution; the evolution of African and Afrikaner nationalism; the rise and fall of the apartheid state; the politics of post-apartheid transformation; and the AIDS crisis.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Campbell, J. (PI)
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