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231 - 240 of 513 results for: all courses

FEMGEN 139: Rereading Judaism in Light of Feminism (JEWISHST 139)

During the past three decades, Jewish feminists have asked new questions of traditional rabbinic texts, Jewish law, history, and religious life and thought. Analysis of the legal and narrative texts, rituals, theology, and community to better understand contemporary Jewish life as influenced by feminism.
| UG Reqs: GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED

FEMGEN 140D: LGBT/Queer Life in the United States (FEMGEN 240D, HISTORY 257C)

An introductory course on LGBT social, cultural, and political history in the United States. This course explores how categories of sexuality have changed over time, with particular emphasis on the relationship among homosexuality, heterosexuality, and transgenderism. Students will analyze how the intersections of race, class, and sexuality influenced the constitution of these categories and the politics of social relations. Historical and literary sources will be used to examine changes in LGBT experiences and identities, primarily in the twentieth century.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Davies, A. (PI)

FEMGEN 142: Sociology of Gender (FEMGEN 242, SOC 142, SOC 242)

(Graduate students register for 242.) Gender inequality in contemporary American society and how it is maintained. The social and relative nature of knowledge and the problems this poses for understanding sex differences and gendered behavior in society. Analytical levels of explanation for gender inequalities: socialization, interaction processes, and socioeconomic processes; arguments and evidence for each approach. The social consequences of gender inequality such as the feminization of poverty, and problems of interpersonal relations.
| UG Reqs: GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

FEMGEN 144: History of Women and Gender in Science, Medicine and Engineering (HISTORY 144)

(Same as HISTORY 44. Majors and others taking 5 units, enroll in HISTORY 144.) Men's and women's roles in science, medicine, and engineering over the past 200 years with a focus on the present. What efforts are underway globally to transform research institutions so that both men's and women's careers can flourish? How have science and medicine studied and defined males and females? How can we harness the creative power of gender analysis to enhance knowledge and spark innovation?
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

FEMGEN 144X: Transforming Self and Systems: Crossing Borders of Race, Nation, Gender, Sexuality, and Class (ASNAMST 144, CSRE 144)

Exploration of crossing borders within ourselves, and between us and them, based on a belief that understanding the self leads to understanding others. How personal identity struggles have meaning beyond the individual, how self healing can lead to community healing, how the personal is political, and how artistic self expression based in self understanding can address social issues. The tensions of victimization and agency, contemplation and action, humanities and science, embracing knowledge that comes from the heart as well as the mind. Studies are founded in synergistic consciousness as movement toward meaning, balance, connectedness, and wholeness. Engaging these questions through group process, journaling, reading, drama, creative writing, and storytelling. Study is academic and self-reflective, with an emphasis on developing and presenting creative works in various media that express identity development across borders.
| UG Reqs: WAY-CE, WAY-ED

FEMGEN 145: Culture Wars: Art and Social Conflict in the USA, 1890-1950 (AMSTUD 145M, ARTHIST 145, ARTHIST 345)

This course examines social conflicts and political controversies in American culture through the lens of visual art and photography. We consider how visual images both reflect and participate in the social and political life of the nation and how the terms of citizenship have been represented¿and, at times, contested¿by artists throughout the first half of the 20th century. The class explores the relation between American art and the body politic by focusing on issues of poverty, war, censorship, consumerism, class identity, and racial division.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

FEMGEN 150: Sex, Gender, and Power in Modern China (CHINGEN 150, CHINGEN 250, FEMGEN 250)

Investigates how sex, gender, and power are entwined in the Chinese experience of modernity. Topics include anti-footbinding campaigns, free love/free sex, women's mobilization in revolution and war, the new Marriage Law of 1950, Mao's iron girls, postsocialist celebrations of sensuality, and emergent queer politics. Readings range from feminist theory to China-focused historiography, ethnography, memoir, biography, fiction, essay, and film. All course materials are in English.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

FEMGEN 155: The Changing American Family (FEMGEN 255, SOC 155, SOC 255)

Family change from historical, social, demographic, and legal perspectives. Extramarital cohabitation, divorce, later marriage, interracial marriage, and same-sex cohabitation. The emergence of same-sex marriage as a political issue. Are recent changes in the American family really as dramatic as they seem? Theories about what causes family systems to change.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

FEMGEN 156H: Women and Medicine in US History: Women as Patients, Healers and Doctors (AMSTUD 156H, HISTORY 156G)

Women's bodies in sickness and health, and encounters with lay and professional healers from the 18th century to the present. Historical consttruction of thought about women's bodies and physical limitations; sexuality; birth control and abortion; childbirth; adulthood; and menopause and aging. Women as healers, including midwives, lay physicians, the medical profession, and nursing.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Horn, M. (PI)

FEMGEN 156X: Language and Gender (LINGUIST 156)

The role of language in the construction of gender, the maintenance of the gender order, and social change. Field projects explore hypotheses about the interaction of language and gender. No knowledge of linguistics required.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI
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