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181 - 190 of 513 results for: all courses

CSRE 226: Race and Racism in American Politics (AMSTUD 226, POLISCI 226, POLISCI 326)

Topics include the historical conceptualization of race; whether and how racial animus reveals itself and the forms it might take; its role in the creation and maintenance of economic stratification; its effect on contemporary U.S. partisan and electoral politics; and policy making consequences.
| UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

CSRE 243: Writing Across Languages and Cultures: Research in Writing and Writing Instruction (EDUC 145, EDUC 243)

Theoretical perspectives that have dominated the literature on writing research. Reports, articles, and chapters on writing research, theory, and instruction; current and historical perspectives in writing research and research findings relating to teaching and learning in this area.
| UG Reqs: WAY-ED
Instructors: Ball, A. (PI)

CSRE 260: California's Minority-Majority Cities (HISTORY 260)

Historical development and the social, cultural, and political issues that characterize large cities and suburbs where communities of color make up majority populations. Case studies include cities in Los Angeles, Santa Clara, and Monterey counties. Comparisons to minority-majority cities elsewhere in the U.S. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center).
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: McKibben, C. (PI)

CTL 165: Race, Athletics and College Achievement (AFRICAAM 165, CSRE 165)

How does racial group membership affect academic experiences, and how do race and athletic participation intersect with collegiate life? In this class, we will explore the relationships among race, athletic status, and academic experiences, with a focus on social science data and the specific experiences of Stanford students. Readings will draw from psychology, sociology, education, and popular press. This class is a seminar format with no prerequisites.
| UG Reqs: WAY-ED

DANCE 24: Introduction to Dance in the African Diaspora (AFRICAAM 24, CSRE 24D, TAPS 152D)

This course introduces students to dance as an important cultural force in the African Diaspora. From capoeira in Brazil to dance hall in Jamaica to hip hop in the United States and Ghana, we will analyze dance as a form of resistance to slavery, colonialism, and oppression; as an integral component of community formation; and as a practice that shapes racial, gendered, and national identity. We will explore these topics through readings, film viewings, and movement workshops (no previous dance experience required). Students will have the option to do a creative performance as part of their final project.
| UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED
Instructors: Das, J. (PI)

DANCE 160: Rethinking the Ballerina (FEMGEN 160, TAPS 160, TAPS 260)

The ballerina occupies a unique place in popular imagination as an object of over-determined femininity as well as an emblem of extreme physical accomplishment for the female dancer. This seminar is designed as an investigation into histories of the ballerina as an iconographic symbol and cultural reference point for challenges to political and gender ideals. Through readings, videos, discussions and viewings of live performances this class investigates pivotal works, artists and eras in the global histories of ballet from its origins as a symbol of patronage and power in the 15th century through to its radical experiments as a site of cultural obedience and disobedience in the 20th and 21st centuries.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED
Instructors: Ross, J. (PI)

DANCE 197: Dance in Prison: The Arts, Juvenile Justice, and Rehabilitation in America (TAPS 197)

This class works collaboratively with a local juvenile hall to use civic engagement and performance to explore the aesthetic, cultural and legal issues in the lives of incarcerated youth. In the process students gain an understanding of incarceration on an immediate and personal scale. Taught jointly by a Dance Studies scholar and a lawyer specializing in Juvenile Justice, we will consider what unique understandings are possible if we position the arts as central to an exploration of punishment, rehabilitation and recidivism in America. The course will examine case studies, historical and contemporary narratives about the social, imaginative and behavioral change possible through arts programs in prison.Half of the class meetings will be in Hillcrest Juvenile Hall in San Mateo, where our class will join with a group of 13-18 year old youths currently detained there. Dance will be used to help shape their individual expressive voices, and ours, through collaborative hip hop dance classes. Books to be read are Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption by Bryan Stevenson, and Last Chance in Texas by John Hubner.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED
Instructors: Ross, J. (PI)

DLCL 123: Medieval Journeys: Introduction through the Art and Architecture (ARTHIST 105B)

The course explores the experience and imagination of medieval journeys through an interdisciplinary, cross-cultural, and skills-based approaches. As a foundations class, this survey of medieval culture engages in particular the art and architecture of the period. The Middle Ages is presented as a network of global economies, fueled by a desire for natural resources, access to luxury goods and holy sites. We will study a large geographical area encompassing the British Isles, Europe, the Mediterranean, Central Asia, India, and East Africa and trace the connectivity of these lands in economic, political, religious, and artistic terms from the fourth to the fourteenth century C.E. The students will have two lectures and one discussion session per week. Depending on the size of the class, it is possible that a graduate student TA will run the discussion session. Our goal is to give a skills-oriented approach to the Middle Ages and to engage students in creative projects that will satisfy 1. Ways-Creative Expression requirement as well as one of the following two: Ways-Analytical Interpretive or Ways-Engaging Difference.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-CE, WAY-ED

EARTHSYS 118: Heritage, Environment, and Sovereignty in Hawaii (ANTHRO 118)

This course explores the cultural, political economic, and environmental status of contemporary Hawaiians. What sorts of sustainable economic and environmental systems did Hawaiians use in prehistory? How was colonization of the Hawaiian Islands informed and shaped by American economic interests and the nascent imperialsm of the early 20th centrury? How was sovereignty and Native Hawaiian identity been shaped by these forces? How has tourism and the leisure industry affected the natural environment? This course uses archaeological methods, ethnohistorical sources, and historical analysis in an exploration of contemporary Hawaiian social economic and political life.
| UG Reqs: WAY-ED

EARTHSYS 160: Sustainable Cities (URBANST 164)

Service-learning course that exposes students to sustainability concepts and urban planning as a tool for determining sustainable outcomes in the Bay Area. Focus will be on the relationship of land use and transportation planning to housing and employment patterns, mobility, public health, and social equity. Topics will include government initiatives to counteract urban sprawl and promote smart growth and livability, political realities of organizing and building coalitions around sustainability goals, and increasing opportunities for low-income and communities of color to achieve sustainability outcomes. Students will participate in team-based projects in collaboration with local community partners and take part in significant off-site fieldwork. Prerequisites: consent of the instructor.
| UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Chan, D. (PI)
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