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71 - 80 of 298 results for: CSI::certificate

EARTHSYS 103: Understanding Energy (CEE 107A, CEE 207A)

Energy is the number one contributor to climate change and has significant consequences for our society, political system, economy, and environment. Energy is also a fundamental driver of human development and opportunity. In taking this course, students will not only understand the fundamentals of each energy resource -- including significance and potential, conversion processes and technologies, drivers and barriers, policy and regulation, and social, economic, and environmental impacts -- students will also be able to put this in the context of the broader energy system. Both depletable and renewable energy resources are covered, including oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear, biomass and biofuel, hydroelectric, wind, solar thermal and photovoltaics (PV), geothermal, and ocean energy, with cross-cutting topics including electricity, storage, climate change and greenhouse gas emissions (GHG), sustainability, green buildings, energy efficiency, transportation, and the developing world. The more »
Energy is the number one contributor to climate change and has significant consequences for our society, political system, economy, and environment. Energy is also a fundamental driver of human development and opportunity. In taking this course, students will not only understand the fundamentals of each energy resource -- including significance and potential, conversion processes and technologies, drivers and barriers, policy and regulation, and social, economic, and environmental impacts -- students will also be able to put this in the context of the broader energy system. Both depletable and renewable energy resources are covered, including oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear, biomass and biofuel, hydroelectric, wind, solar thermal and photovoltaics (PV), geothermal, and ocean energy, with cross-cutting topics including electricity, storage, climate change and greenhouse gas emissions (GHG), sustainability, green buildings, energy efficiency, transportation, and the developing world. The course is 4 units, which includes lecture and in-class discussion, readings and videos, homework assignments, virtual field trips, and a small-group discussion section once a week for 50 minutes (live participation is required, many different times will be offered). Lectures will be recorded and available on Canvas. No in-person field trips will be offered for AY 2020-2021 ¿ but alumni of the class can optionally attend field trips in future quarters. Enroll for 5 units to also attend the Workshop, an interactive discussion section on cross-cutting topics that meets once per week for 80 minutes (timing TBD). The 3-unit option requires instructor approval - please contact Diana Gragg. Open to all: pre-majors and majors, with any background! Website: https://energy.stanford.edu/understanding-energy. CEE 107S/207S Understanding Energy: Essentials is a shorter (3 unit) version of this course, offered summer quarter. Students should not take both for credit. Prerequisites: Algebra.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SI

EARTHSYS 111: Biology and Global Change (BIO 117, EARTHSYS 217, ESS 111)

The biological causes and consequences of anthropogenic and natural changes in the atmosphere, oceans, and terrestrial and freshwater ecosystems. Topics: glacial cycles and marine circulation, greenhouse gases and climate change, tropical deforestation and species extinctions, and human population growth and resource use. Prerequisite: Biology or Human Biology core or BIO 81 or graduate standing.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA

EARTHSYS 137: Concepts and Analytic Skills for the Social Sector (URBANST 132)

How to develop and grow innovative not-for-profit organizations and for-profit enterprises which have the primary goal of solving social and environmental problems. Topics include organizational mission, strategy, market/user analysis, communications, funding, recruitment and impact evaluation. Perspectives from the field of social entrepreneurship, design thinking and social change organizing. Opportunities and limits of using methods from the for-profit sector to meet social goals. Focus is on integrating theory with practical applications, including several case exercises and simulations.One-day practicum where students advise an actual social impact organization. Enrollment limited to 20. Prerequisite:consent of instructor. Email lalitvak@stanford.edu
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI | Repeatable 10 times (up to 40 units total)
Instructors: Litvak, L. (PI)

EARTHSYS 160: Sustainable Cities (URBANST 164)

Community-engaged learning course that exposes students to sustainability concepts and urban planning as a tool for determining sustainable outcomes in the Bay Area. The focus will be on land use and transportation planning to housing and employment patterns, mobility, public health, and social equity. Topics will include government initiatives to counteract urban sprawl and promote smart growth and livability, political realities of organizing and building coalitions around sustainability goals, and increasing opportunities for low-income and communities of color to achieve sustainability outcomes. Students will participate in remote team-based projects in collaboration with Bay Area community partners. Prerequisites: Consent of the instructor. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center.)
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Repeatable 20 times (up to 100 units total)
Instructors: Chan, D. (PI)

EARTHSYS 180: Principles and Practices of Sustainable Agriculture (ESS 280)

Field-based training in ecologically sound agricultural practices at the Stanford Community Farm. Weekly lessons, field work, and group projects. Field trips to educational farms in the area. Topics include: soils, composting, irrigation techniques, IPM, basic plant anatomy and physiology, weeds, greenhouse management, and marketing. Application required. Deadline: September 10 for Autumn and March 10 for Spring. nnApplication: https://stanforduniversity.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_244JnBoEP7zs8Dz
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Repeatable 3 times (up to 12 units total)

EASTASN 117: Health and Healthcare Systems in East Asia (EASTASN 217)

China, Japan, and both Koreas. Healthcare economics as applied to East Asian health policy, including economic development, population aging, infectious disease outbreaks (SARS, avian flu), social health insurance, health service delivery, payment incentives, competition, workforce policy, pharmaceutical industry, and regulation. No prior knowledge of economics or healthcare required.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5

EASTASN 162: Seminar on the Evolution of the Modern Chinese State, 1550-Present (EASTASN 262)

This seminar will assess the evolving response of the late imperial, early Republican, Nanjing Republic, and the PRC regimes in response to China's changing international setting, to successive revolutions in warfare, and to fundamental economic, social and demographic trends domestically from the 16th century to present. It will assess the capacities of each successive Chinese state to extract resources from society and economy and to mobilize people behind national purposes, to elaborate centralized institutions to pursue national priorities, to marshal military forces for national defense and police forces to sustain domestic order, and to generate popular identities loyal to national authority.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Miller, A. (PI)

EASTASN 217: Health and Healthcare Systems in East Asia (EASTASN 117)

China, Japan, and both Koreas. Healthcare economics as applied to East Asian health policy, including economic development, population aging, infectious disease outbreaks (SARS, avian flu), social health insurance, health service delivery, payment incentives, competition, workforce policy, pharmaceutical industry, and regulation. No prior knowledge of economics or healthcare required.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5

EASTASN 262: Seminar on the Evolution of the Modern Chinese State, 1550-Present (EASTASN 162)

This seminar will assess the evolving response of the late imperial, early Republican, Nanjing Republic, and the PRC regimes in response to China's changing international setting, to successive revolutions in warfare, and to fundamental economic, social and demographic trends domestically from the 16th century to present. It will assess the capacities of each successive Chinese state to extract resources from society and economy and to mobilize people behind national purposes, to elaborate centralized institutions to pursue national priorities, to marshal military forces for national defense and police forces to sustain domestic order, and to generate popular identities loyal to national authority.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Miller, A. (PI)

ECON 118: Development Economics

The microeconomic problems and policy concerns of less developed countries. Topics include: health and education; risk and insurance; microfinance; agriculture; technology; governance. Emphasis is on economic models and empirical evidence. Prerequisites: ECON 50, ECON 102B.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-AQR, WAY-SI
Instructors: Morten, M. (PI)
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