2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020 2020-2021
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 
  COVID-19 Scheduling Updates!
Due to recent announcements about Autumn Quarter (see the President's update), please expect ongoing changes to the class schedule.

201 - 210 of 299 results for: CSI::certificate

INTNLREL 136R: Introduction to Global Justice (ETHICSOC 136R, PHIL 76, POLISCI 136R, POLISCI 336)

This course explores the normative demands and definitions of justice that transcend the nation-state and its borders, through the lenses of political justice, economic justice, and human rights. What are our duties (if any) towards those who live in other countries? Should we be held morally responsible for their suffering? What if we have contributed to it? Should we be asked to remedy it? At what cost? These are some of the questions driving the course. Although rooted in political theory and philosophy, the course will examine contemporary problems that have been addressed by other scholarly disciplines, public debates, and popular media, such as immigration and open borders, climate change refugees, and the morality of global capitalism (from exploitative labor to blood diamonds). As such, readings will combine canonical pieces of political theory and philosophy with readings from other scholarly disciplines, newspaper articles, and popular media.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-EthicReas, WAY-ER

INTNLREL 141A: Camera as Witness: International Human Rights Documentaries

Rarely screened documentary films, focusing on global problems, human rights issues, and aesthetic challenges in making documentaries on international topics. Meetings with filmmakers.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum
Instructors: Bojic, J. (PI)

JEWISHST 384C: Genocide and Humanitarian Intervention (HISTORY 224C, HISTORY 324C, JEWISHST 284C, PEDS 224)

Open to medical students, graduate students, and undergraduate students. Traces the history of genocide in the 20th century and the question of humanitarian intervention to stop it, a topic that has been especially controversial since the end of the Cold War. The pre-1990s discussion begins with the Armenian genocide during the First World War and includes the Holocaust and Cambodia under the Khmer Rouge in the 1970s. Coverage of genocide and humanitarian intervention since the 1990s includes the wars in Bosnia, Rwanda, Kosovo, the Congo and Sudan.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

LAW 2503: Energy Law

Modern energy systems aim to deliver a supply of reliable, low-cost, and clean energy; in turn, they require major capital investments in infrastructure projects, some of which have the features of a natural monopoly and therefore require ongoing economic regulation. The U.S. energy system today is subject to a complex regime of state and federal laws. We will examine the historical role of state-level electric utility regulation, tracing its evolution into the various forms of regulated and deregulated energy markets now in use in the U.S. electricity and natural gas sectors. Contemporary energy law increasingly involves a delicate federalist balance where state and federal regulators share overlapping authority in contested policy areas that are subject to major technological and economic change. Finally, we will interrogate the contested ideals of regulation and competition, which private, non-profit, and governmental stakeholders deploy in legal and political fora to advance privat more »
Modern energy systems aim to deliver a supply of reliable, low-cost, and clean energy; in turn, they require major capital investments in infrastructure projects, some of which have the features of a natural monopoly and therefore require ongoing economic regulation. The U.S. energy system today is subject to a complex regime of state and federal laws. We will examine the historical role of state-level electric utility regulation, tracing its evolution into the various forms of regulated and deregulated energy markets now in use in the U.S. electricity and natural gas sectors. Contemporary energy law increasingly involves a delicate federalist balance where state and federal regulators share overlapping authority in contested policy areas that are subject to major technological and economic change. Finally, we will interrogate the contested ideals of regulation and competition, which private, non-profit, and governmental stakeholders deploy in legal and political fora to advance private gain and public goods. Students who complete the class will gain a historical understanding of how economic regulation of the energy sector has evolved since the early 20th century, a durable conceptual framework for understanding modern energy law and policy debates, and a practical understanding of energy law designed for future practitioners. Non-law students interested in energy issues are highly encouraged to take this course, as energy law literacy is essential to careers in the sector. Elements used in grading: class participation, short written assignments, and a one-day take-home final exam. Cross-listed with Environment and Resources ( ENVRES 226).
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

LAW 7508: Problem Solving and Decision Making for Public Policy and Social Change

Stanford graduates will play important roles in solving many of today's and tomorrow's major societal problems--in areas such as education, health, energy, and domestic and global poverty--that call for actions by nonprofit, business, and hybrid organizations as well as governments. This course teaches skills and bodies of knowledge relevant to these roles, covering topics such as designing, implementing, scaling, and evaluating social strategies; systems thinking; decision making under risk; psychological biases that adversely affect people's decisions; and methods for influencing behavior. You will work in teams to apply these concepts and tools to actual problems, with teams choosing whatever problem interests them. To address the problems, you will do a mixture of online research and ethnographic field work. To facilitate the ethnography, it is preferable to choose a problem that occurs on campus or nearby, such as bike safety; electric scooter safety; food waste; free speech and p more »
Stanford graduates will play important roles in solving many of today's and tomorrow's major societal problems--in areas such as education, health, energy, and domestic and global poverty--that call for actions by nonprofit, business, and hybrid organizations as well as governments. This course teaches skills and bodies of knowledge relevant to these roles, covering topics such as designing, implementing, scaling, and evaluating social strategies; systems thinking; decision making under risk; psychological biases that adversely affect people's decisions; and methods for influencing behavior. You will work in teams to apply these concepts and tools to actual problems, with teams choosing whatever problem interests them. To address the problems, you will do a mixture of online research and ethnographic field work. To facilitate the ethnography, it is preferable to choose a problem that occurs on campus or nearby, such as bike safety; electric scooter safety; food waste; free speech and protection from harmful speech; other issues of diversity and inclusion; problems faced by first generation students, disabled students, or other groups of students; stress; alcohol and cannabis use; smoking and vaping. The course may be of interest to students in Law and Policy Lab practicums who wish to broaden their policy analysis skills. The class is limited to 32 students, with priority given to students who register on or before the last day of the autumn quarter in the following order: Law School, MPP program, Sustainability Science and Practice Program, IPS program. After that date, any remaining places will be filled on a first-come, first-served basis. Students other than law students must seek the consent of the instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 4
Instructors: Brest, P. (PI)

MATSCI 156: Solar Cells, Fuel Cells, and Batteries: Materials for the Energy Solution

Operating principles and applications of emerging technological solutions to the energy demands of the world. The scale of global energy usage and requirements for possible solutions. Basic physics and chemistry of solar cells, fuel cells, and batteries. Performance issues, including economics, from the ideal device to the installed system. The promise of materials research for providing next generation solutions. Undergraduates register in 156 for 4 units; graduates register in 256 for 3 units. Prerequisites: MATSCI 145 and 152 or equivalent coursework in thermodynamics and electronic properties.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci
Instructors: Clemens, B. (PI)

ME 206A: Design for Extreme Affordability

Design for Extreme Affordability (fondly called Extreme) is a two-quarter course offered by the d.school through the School of Engineering and the Graduate School of Business. This multidisciplinary project-based experience creates an enabling environment in which students learn to design products and services that will change the lives of the world's poorest citizens. Students work directly with course partners on real world problems, the culmination of which is actual implementation and real impact. Topics include design thinking, product and service design, rapid prototype engineering and testing, business modelling, social entrepreneurship, team dynamics, impact measurement, operations planning and ethics. Possibility to travel overseas during spring break. Previous projects include d.light, Driptech, Earthenable, Embrace, the Lotus Pump, MiracleBrace, Noora Health and Sanku. Periodic design reviews; Final course presentation and expo; industry and adviser interaction. Limited enrollment via application. Must sign up for ME206A and ME206B. See extreme.stanford.edu
Terms: Win | Units: 4

ME 206B: Design for Extreme Affordability

Design for Extreme Affordability (fondly called Extreme) is a two-quarter course offered by the d.school through the School of Engineering and the Graduate School of Business. This multidisciplinary project-based experience creates an enabling environment in which students learn to design products and services that will change the lives of the world's poorest citizens. Students work directly with course partners on real world problems, the culmination of which is actual implementation and real impact. Topics include design thinking, product and service design, rapid prototype engineering and testing, business modelling, social entrepreneurship, team dynamics, impact measurement, operations planning and ethics. Possibility to travel overseas during spring break. Previous projects include d.light, Driptech, Earthenable, Embrace, the Lotus Pump, MiracleBrace, Noora Health and Sanku. Periodic design reviews; Final course presentation and expo; industry and adviser interaction. Limited enrollment via application. Must sign up for ME206A and ME206B. See extreme.stanford.edu
Terms: Spr | Units: 4

ME 243: Designing Emotion: for Reactive Car Interfaces

Students learn to define emotions as physiology, expression, and private experience using the automobile and shared space. Explores the meaning and impact of personal and user car experience. Reflective, narrative, and socio-cognitive techniques serve to make sense of mobility experiences; replay memories; examine engagement; understand user interviews. This course celebrates car fascination and leads the student through finding and telling the car experience through discussion, ethnographic research, interviews, and diverse individual and collaborative narrative methods-verbal, non-verbal, and in car experiences. Methods draw from socio-cognitive psychology, design thinking, and fine art, and are applied to the car or mobility experience. Course culminates in a final individual narrative presentation and group project demonstration. Class size limited to 18.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 3 units total)
Instructors: Karanian, B. (PI)

ME 302B: The Future of the Automobile- Driver Assistance and Automated Driving

This course provides a holistic overview over the field of vehicle automation. The course starts with the history of vehicle automation and then introduces key terminology and taxonomy. Guest lecturers present the legal and policy aspects of vehicle automation both on the federal and state level. Then, the state of the art in vehicle automation is provided. This includes sensor and actuator technology as well as the driver assistance technology in cars today. Finally, the technology currently being developed for future highly and fully automated vehicles is described, including a high-level introduction of the software and algorithms used as well as HMI and system aspects. Students are asking to work in groups on a current topic related to vehicle automation and present their findings in the final two classes in a short presentation.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 2 units total)
Instructors: Becker, J. (PI)
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
teaching presence
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints