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61 - 70 of 188 results for: ARTHIST

ARTHIST 243C: The Art of Travel

This undergraduate seminar explores a variety of objects upon which we see the marks of makers smitten and/or stymied by new technologies of transportation ¿ objects about the steamship, the railroad, the automobile, the airplane, the space shuttle, the internet. Among many types of material culture, the course considers scrimshaw, album quilts, maps, paintings, photographs, city plans, hood ornaments, and advertisements from the early Republic to the present. How do objects mark geographic movement, and the social relationships forged in the process? What do these marks tell us about how we, as contemporary viewers, experience the world?
Terms: Win | Units: 5
Instructors: Bennett, E. (PI)

ARTHIST 245: Art, Business & the Law

This course examines the intersection of art, business, and the law from a number of different angles, focusing on issues that impact our understanding of works of art and their circulation in the modern and contemporary periods. Topics range from individual case studies (e.g., Leonardo da Vinci; Richard Serra) to the consolidation of the art market, and include cultural heritage issues, problems of censorship, and conceptions of authorship and intellectual property.
| UG Reqs: WAY-A-II

ARTHIST 246B: Pop Art (AMSTUD 246B)

A new course on the history and meaning of Pop art in the United States and abroad. The course will feature close study of paintings, photographs, and prints at the Cantor Art Center. The course will be given in the Denning Family Resource Room, located in The Anderson Collection building. If you have any questions regarding the location, please contact Linda Esquivel at lindae@stanford.edu.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5
Instructors: Meyer, R. (PI)

ARTHIST 263B: The View through the Windshield: Cars and the American Landscape

Both cars and the landscape are fundamental to American identity. This seminar will consider the relationship between them: how they have shaped each other, how one mediates the experience of the other, and how American artists such as Ansel Adams, Edward Hopper, and Ed Ruscha have represented both. We will discuss the relationship between nature and technology; the aesthetics of highways and parkways; the phenomenology of driving and road trips; maps and way finding; and the future of cars, mapping, and the landscape.
| UG Reqs: WAY-A-II

ARTHIST 264A: Picturing the Cosmos

This seminar explores the place of images in how we understand and imagine the universe. The course draws on art, science, and popular culture, and pays particular attention to the ways they inform each other. Examples include: star maps, science fiction films, appropriated astronomical images, and telescopic views of stars, planets, and nebulae. Using these representations as well as accompanying readings we will discuss the importance of aesthetics for conceptions of the cosmos; the influence of technology on representations; strategies for representing concepts that exceed the limits of human vision; and the ways that views of the universe reflect and shape their cultural context. Open to undergraduates and graduates.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II

ARTHIST 278: Anatomy of Exhibition

This course provides students with the opportunity to research, write the exhibition texts, design, and install an exhibition at the Cantor Arts Center of paintings, prints, and drawings by African American artist Jacob Lawrence (1917-2000). An influential force in 20th-century art, Lawrence captured the trials and triumphs of the black experience. The works are a recent gift to the Cantor that have only rarely been exhibited up to now.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED
Instructors: Mitchell, E. (PI)

ARTHIST 284B: Museum Cultures: Material Representation in the Past and Present (AMSTUD 134, ARCHLGY 134, ARCHLGY 234, CSRE 134, EDUC 214, NATIVEAM 134)

Students will open the ¿black box¿ of museums to consider the past and present roles of institutional collections, culminating in a student-curated exhibition. Today, museums assert their relevance as dynamic spaces for debate and learning. Colonialism and restitution, the politics of representation, human/object relationships, and changing frameworks of authority make museum work widely significant and consistently challenging. Through thinking-in-practice, this course reflexively explores ¿museum cultures¿: representations of ¿self¿ and ¿other¿ within museums and institutional cultures of the museum world itself.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Repeatable 3 times (up to 15 units total)
Instructors: Hodge, C. (PI)

ARTHIST 287A: The Japanese Tea Ceremony: The History, Aesthetics, and Politics Behind a National Pastime (JAPANGEN 287A)

The Japanese tea ceremony, the ultimate premodern multimedia phenomenon, integrates architecture, garden design, ceramics, painting, calligraphy, and other treasured objects into a choreographed ritual wherein host, objects, and guests perform designated roles on a tiny stage sometimes only six feet square.. In addition to its much-touted aesthetic and philosophical aspects, the practice of tea includes inevitable political and rhetorical dimensions. This course traces the evolution of tea practice from its inception within the milieu of courtier diversions, Zen monasteries, and warrior villas, through its various permutations into the 20th century, where it was manipulated by the emerging industrialist class for different-but ultimately similar-ends.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 5
Instructors: Takeuchi, M. (PI)

ARTHIST 289A: Making the Masterpiece in Song Dynasty China (ARTHIST 489A)

Studies of canon formation involving Song Dynasty (10-13th c.) Chinese works of painting, calligraphy, ceramics, and architecture. The roles of early art writing and criticism; collecting histories; art historical theory; / copying, imitation, and reproductive practices; period and regional taste; and modern museological and art historical discourses in identifying and constructing a canon of Song masterworks.
Terms: Win | Units: 5
Instructors: Vinograd, R. (PI)

ARTHIST 294: Writing and the Visual

The course examines how various forms of writing and description--from wall labels to scholarly texts¿shape the history and perception of visual objects. Through concrete examples, we will analyze the limits of language in describing visual images and consider how those limits might be expanded or redrawn. Required course for Art History majors.WIM Course.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 10 units total)
Instructors: Meyer, R. (PI)
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