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101 - 110 of 210 results for: ARTHIST

ARTHIST 252: Transatlantic American Art

This is an American art history course from a transatlantic perspective, considering the ties between the United States and England from the colonial era to World War I, a period in which both nations underwent a similar trajectory of industrialization, urbanization, democratization, and expansionism/imperialism. We will explore the ways in which American attitudes towards England oscillated between anxious emulation and proud repudiation, as the ideas of ¿British culture¿ and ¿Englishness¿ became catalysts for national self-definition and touchstones for gendered and racialized metaphors of national vigor or decline. We will also examine how American artists received aesthetic conventions and artistic genres from Britain, and how the geography of the American landscape and questions of national character and taste challenged these traditions.
Terms: Win | Units: 5

ARTHIST 255: Hidden Histories: Art and Misrepresentation

What happens when art functions as a decoy, taking us away from stories that it refuses to tell? We will explore three modern artists who grapple, in unpredictable ways, with the historical events that have shaped them: Philip Guston and the Holocaust; Martin Puryear and the Civil Rights movement; and South African artist William Kentridge and apartheid. When appropriate, we will look at objects at the Cantor Art Center (Stanford) as well as museums in the Bay Area. The course will provide the foundation for an exhibition at the Cantor Arts Center and the Yale University Art Gallery in 2016.
Last offered: Spring 2014

ARTHIST 262: Office of Metropolitan Architecture: Workshop of the New (CEE 132Q)

This seminar investigates all aspects of the work of the Office of Metropolitan Architecture (OMA) and its leader Rem Koolhaas. Topics for class research and inquiry include but are not be limited to: Koolhaas's early work at the Architectural Association and the founding of OMA, the publications of OMA and their style of presentation and theoretical foundations, the importance of AMO, and the architects who have left OMA and founded their own practices and how these differ from OMA. Each student completes an in-depth research paper and an in-class presentation.
Last offered: Autumn 2013 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum

ARTHIST 263B: The View through the Windshield: Cars and the American Landscape

Both cars and the landscape are fundamental to American identity. This seminar will consider the relationship between them: how they have shaped each other, how one mediates the experience of the other, and how American artists such as Ansel Adams, Edward Hopper, and Ed Ruscha have represented both. We will discuss the relationship between nature and technology; the aesthetics of highways and parkways; the phenomenology of driving and road trips; maps and way finding; and the future of cars, mapping, and the landscape.
Last offered: Autumn 2013 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II

ARTHIST 264A: Picturing the Cosmos

This seminar explores the place of images in how we understand and imagine the universe. The course draws on art, science, and popular culture, and pays particular attention to the ways they inform each other. Examples include: star maps, science fiction films, appropriated astronomical images, and telescopic views of stars, planets, and nebulae. Using these representations as well as accompanying readings we will discuss the importance of aesthetics for conceptions of the cosmos; the influence of technology on representations; strategies for representing concepts that exceed the limits of human vision; and the ways that views of the universe reflect and shape their cultural context. Open to undergraduates and graduates.
Last offered: Spring 2013 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II

ARTHIST 264B: Starstuff: Space and the American Imagination (AMSTUD 143X, FILMSTUD 264B)

Course on the history of twentieth and twenty-first century American images of space and how they shape conceptions of the universe. Covers representations made by scientists and artists, as well as scientific fiction films, TV, and other forms of popular visual culture. Topics will include the importance of aesthetics to understandings of the cosmos; the influence of media and technology on representations; the social, political, and historical context of the images; and the ways representations of space influence notions of American national identity and of cosmic citizenship.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II
Instructors: Kessler, E. (PI)

ARTHIST 273: Visual Culture of the Arctic (FILMSTUD 273)

In what ways does contemporary art address the slowly unfolding catastrophes of melting ice and thawing permafrost in the Arctic due to climate change? How might contemporary art and experimental cinema help us come to grips with the emotional disturbance of living amidst the deep-seated changes that are happening in our environment? These are the key questions this course attempts to answer.nThe first part of the class attempts to outline the complex history of Arctic visual and cultural representations through an interdisciplinary lens. The second part focuses on the more recent artistic and cinematic responses to climate change in the arctic. For their final projects, students will be able to combine analytical writing with creative projects that could take the form of photography, installation art, web-based art, fiction, video or poetry.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5
Instructors: Bloom, L. (PI)

ARTHIST 278: Curating Africa: Anatomy of an Exhibition

Gain hands-on curatorial experience redesigning the African galleries at the Cantor Arts Center. Explore and debate strategies for presenting diverse art forms, including a mummy from Ancient Egypt, early twentieth-century masks, and contemporary photography. Conduct research, prepare wall texts and labels, and participate in designing a new exhibition space in collaboration with fellow students, faculty, and community members.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED
Instructors: Hale, C. (PI)

ARTHIST 284B: Museum Cultures: Material Representation in the Past and Present (AMSTUD 134, ARCHLGY 134, ARCHLGY 234, CSRE 134, EDUC 214, NATIVEAM 134)

Students will open the "black box" of museums to consider the past and present roles of institutional collections, culminating in a student-curated exhibition. Today, museums assert their relevance as dynamic spaces for debate and learning. Colonialism and restitution, the politics of representation, human/object relationships, and changing frameworks of authority make museum work widely significant and consistently challenging. Through thinking-in-practice, this course reflexively explores "museum cultures": representations of self and other within museums and institutional cultures of the museum world itself.n3 credits (no final project) or 5 credits (final project). May be repeat for credit
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Repeatable 3 times (up to 15 units total)
Instructors: Hodge, C. (PI)

ARTHIST 287: Pictures of the Floating World: Images from Japanese Popular Culture (ARTHIST 487X, JAPANLIT 287)

Printed objects produced during the Edo period (1600-1868), including the Ukiyo-e (pictures of the floating world) and lesser-studied genres such as printed books (ehon) and popular broadsheets (kawaraban). How a society constructs itself through images. The borders of the acceptable and censorship; theatricality, spectacle, and slippage; the construction of play, set in conflict against the dominant neo-Confucian ideology of fixed social roles.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum
Instructors: Takeuchi, M. (PI)
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