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431 - 440 of 488 results for: ANTHRO

ANTHRO 360A: Archival Research for Social Science: A Practicuum

Since the 1980s, the necessity of historicizing cultural and social formations has become established as integral to anthropological research. Every ethnography and dissertation has historical sections, derived primarily from secondary sources, commentaries within other ethnographies and published historical work. Most students attempt to conduct archival research in local or national archives alongside ethnographic fieldwork, most often in an ad hoc manner, collecting and analyzing archival material on a trial and error basis. This class is conceived as a practicum that addresses students who need to and want to do archival research as part of their anthropological and sociological fieldwork, but find themselves at a loss for how to think about, begin, and, do archival work.nnThe base layer of the class is methodological and practical: students will be engaged in the practical activities of becoming acquainted with archives, developing archival research questions, learning techniques more »
Since the 1980s, the necessity of historicizing cultural and social formations has become established as integral to anthropological research. Every ethnography and dissertation has historical sections, derived primarily from secondary sources, commentaries within other ethnographies and published historical work. Most students attempt to conduct archival research in local or national archives alongside ethnographic fieldwork, most often in an ad hoc manner, collecting and analyzing archival material on a trial and error basis. This class is conceived as a practicum that addresses students who need to and want to do archival research as part of their anthropological and sociological fieldwork, but find themselves at a loss for how to think about, begin, and, do archival work.nnThe base layer of the class is methodological and practical: students will be engaged in the practical activities of becoming acquainted with archives, developing archival research questions, learning techniques of recording, coding, and thinking historically. The second layer will be conceptual. Students will be reading and discussing concepts of the archive, reading and analyzing different styles of historical ethnographies, and thinking about how to organize and conceptualize cultural categories historically.nnStudents will be asked to conduct archival research at the archives available at Stanford Libraries and the Hoover Institution archives and write a research paper based on this archival work. We will have weekly meetings divided into two sessions. The first half will discuss set readings and intellectual concern. In the second half, we will discuss methodological concerns, problems encountered in the archives and bounce ideas off each other. We will also have regular guest speakers who will give talks and answer questions, intellectual and methodological about archival research.
Last offered: Spring 2018

ANTHRO 361: Life and Death in Contemporary Latin America: An Anthropological Inquiry

This seminar explores life and death in contemporary Latin America. We will address anthropological understanding of the role of colonialism, migration, violence, urbanization, democratic transition and neoliberalism as they configure the experience of, and threshold between, vital and deadly processes. nnThis is not a standard survey course, covering the region as a whole however. Instead, we will critically engage several recent ethnographies that explore, for example: the politics and practices of memory; border thinking and living; the political economy of death and desire; state violence and social movements; the relationship between the laboring city and body. We will supplement ethnographies with contemporary Latin American critical theory, film, and literary texts. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Last offered: Winter 2013

ANTHRO 362: Human Spatial Dynamics: Seminar in Communicating Contemporary Science

This seminar is designed to bring together all students and faculty currently working on issues related to human use of land and spatially defined resources. The focus is to provide a forum for reporting on recent results and question development, providing students with vital skills in designing and communicating the results of research. Under grads by permission of instructor.
Last offered: Autumn 2010

ANTHRO 362A: Introduction to Human Evolution, Ecology, Genetics, and Culture

Themes and topics of lasting heuristic value in the anthropological sciences. Combines the lecture content of 2A and 2B with a discussion section for graduate students. Must be taken in the Autumn Quarter of a student's first year in the graduate program.
Last offered: Autumn 2008

ANTHRO 363: Queer Anthropology

Feminist and queer theory have profoundly rethought epistemologies as well as methodologies. This graduate seminar will explore the relationship between feminist and queer theory and the new directions proposed by queer anthropology in socio-cultural anthropology and archaeology. In addition, the seminar will discuss the challenges that looking at queer studies from anthropology and archaeology can bring from questions of race, global inequalities, misrecognitions as well as specific historical and cultural genealogies which offer more than simply adding diversity to questions already raised within queer studies. Students will acquire both conceptual and methodological skills. nThis year-long graduate seminar adopts a workshop-like format over the entire 2018-2019 academic year. We will meet for eleven (three hour) meetings over three quarters (4 meetings in Autumn, 3 meetings in Winter, and 4 meetings in Spring. Students are required to enroll in all three quarters. Pre-requisite: instructor consent.
Last offered: Spring 2019 | Repeatable for credit

ANTHRO 363A: Anthropology of Environmental Conservation

Graduate seminar focused on key works by anthropologists on environmental conservation. We will discuss both classics (ie, works by Ostrom, Lansing, Bray) as well recent debates regarding communities, neoliberalism and conservation. Students will present on topics of particular interest or relevance to their research.
Last offered: Autumn 2015 | Repeatable for credit

ANTHRO 364: EcoGroup: Current Topics in Ecological, Evolutionary, and Environmental Anthropology

Seminar; restricted to graduate students. Topics vary with instructor. How to ask appropriate questions, how to derive research hypotheses from theory, how to design methodologies for testing hypotheses, and how to present results by reading and critiquing key contemporary papers in the field. Ph.D. students enrolling in this course to fulfill the department review course requirement must enroll in 5 units. Graduate students enrolling in this course to participate in a topical forum may enroll in 2 units. Course may be repeated for 2 units. Prerequisites: by consent of instructor.
Last offered: Autumn 2015 | Repeatable for credit

ANTHRO 364A: EcoGroup: Problems in Ecological and Evolutionary Anthropology

Seminar; restricted to graduate students. Topics vary with instructor. How to ask appropriate questions, how to derive research hypotheses from theory, how to design methodologies for testing hypotheses, and how to present results by reading and critiquing key contemporary papers in the field. Ph.D. students enrolling in this course to fulfill the department review course requirement must enroll in 5 units. Graduate students enrolling in this course to participate in a topical forum may enroll in 2 units. Course may be repeated for 2 units. Prerequisites: by consent of instructor.
Last offered: Autumn 2011

ANTHRO 365: The Theory of the Modern Subject

This course traces the emergence of a coherent theory of the modern subject through readings of philosophical works and social theory from 18th century to the 20th century. Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor
Last offered: Spring 2013

ANTHRO 365A: Emancipation: Theories and Experiences

Concepts of emancipation have been treated in a wide variety of historical, political, regional and social perspectives. In the US, emancipation and post emancipation societies are primarily understood around histories of enslavement. In the class, while taking inspiration and also covering work on enslavement and emancipation, we will endeavor to discuss theories, ideas and experiences that have been understood as potentially emancipatory from a globally and historically wide-ranging set of ideas. Issues of race, caste, class and gender are axiomatic themes within the class.nEmancipation has frequently been understood as an emancipation from oppression and an impetus towards a form of freedom or new order. While theoretically this is formally understood and discussed, often with historical examples that use experiences to illustrate failures or successes, in this class we will try to understand the texture of practices as the primary means by which ideas about emancipation circulate, more »
Concepts of emancipation have been treated in a wide variety of historical, political, regional and social perspectives. In the US, emancipation and post emancipation societies are primarily understood around histories of enslavement. In the class, while taking inspiration and also covering work on enslavement and emancipation, we will endeavor to discuss theories, ideas and experiences that have been understood as potentially emancipatory from a globally and historically wide-ranging set of ideas. Issues of race, caste, class and gender are axiomatic themes within the class.nEmancipation has frequently been understood as an emancipation from oppression and an impetus towards a form of freedom or new order. While theoretically this is formally understood and discussed, often with historical examples that use experiences to illustrate failures or successes, in this class we will try to understand the texture of practices as the primary means by which ideas about emancipation circulate, imagined, are discussed, are disappointed and so on. We will try and see what an anthropological and historically textured discussion can bring to theoretical discussions of emancipation. We will examine theoretical, historical, sociological and anthropological writings on emancipation, freedom, enslavement and servitude, political mobilization and revolution. Fundamentally this course tries to get students to think globally about multiple and different systems of persisting and enduring oppression and inequality through an emphasis on political thought, political imaginations and concrete political organizations and movements. Prerequisite: consent of instructor
Terms: Spr | Units: 5
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