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31 - 40 of 390 results for: ANTHRO

ANTHRO 111B: Muwekma: Landscape Archaeology and the Narratives of California Natives (ARCHLGY 111B, NATIVEAM 111B)

This course explores the unique history of San Francisco Bay Area tribes with particular attention to Muwekma Ohlone- the descendent community associated with the landscape surrounding and including Stanford University. The story of Muwekma provides a window into the history of California Indians from prehistory to Spanish exploration and colonization, the role of Missionaries and the controversial legacy of Junipero Serra, Indigenous rebellions throughout California, citizenship and land title during the 19th century, the historical role of anthropology and archaeology in shaping policy and recognition of Muwekma, and the fight for acknowledgement of Muwekma as a federally recognized tribe. We will visit local sites associated with this history and participate in field surveys of the landscape of Muwekma.
Instructors: Wilcox, M. (PI)

ANTHRO 112: Public Archaeology: Market Street Chinatown Archaeology Project (ANTHRO 212, ASNAMST 112)

This internship-style course centers on the practice and theory of historical archaeology research and interpretation through a focused study of San Jose's historic Chinese communities. The course includes classroom lectures, seminar discussion, laboratory analysis of historic artifacts, and participation in public archaeology events. Course themes include immigration, urbanization, material culture, landscape, transnational identities, race and ethnicity, gender, cultural resource management, public history, and heritage politics. The course includes required lab sections, field trips, and public service. Transportation will be provided for off-site activities.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED

ANTHRO 113B: Religious Practices in Archaeological Cultures (ANTHRO 213B, ARCHLGY 113B)

According to Hawkes (1954), religion or ideology is the most difficult part of social life to access archaeologically. Luckily, not all scholars agree; according to Fogelin (2008) 'religion is not something people think about, but something people do¿. Thus, archaeology, an inherently multidisciplinary subject that studies material culture, is well suited to delve into religion and its underpinnings.nThis course will explore religious practices, as they can be defined and interpreted from archaeological contexts spanning the Paleolithic to historic periods. Definitions of religion differ from author to author but they mostly agree that religion is a fully integrated and thus integral part of human social life. Politics, economics, identity and social class influence religion, and religion influences how these forces play out in society. Thus, the course will also examine the significance of ritual and religion in a variety of social contexts.
| UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED
Instructors: Caval, S. (PI)

ANTHRO 114: Prehistoric Stone Tools: Technology and Analysis (ANTHRO 214)

Archaeologists rely on an understanding of stone tools to trace much of what we know about prehistoric societies. How to make, illustrate, and analyze stone tools, revealing the method and theory intrinsic to these artifacts.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci

ANTHRO 115: The Social life of Human Bones (ANTHRO 215, ARCHLGY 115)

Skeletal remains serve a primary function of support and protection for the human body. However, beyond this, they have played a range of social roles once an individual is deceased. The processes associated with excarnation, interment, exhumation and reburial all speak to the place that the body, and its parts, play in our cultural as well as physical landscape.n This course builds on introductory courses in human skeletal anatomy by adding the social dynamics that govern the way humans treat other humans once they have died. It draws on anthropological, biological and archaeological research, with case studies spanning a broad chronological and spatial framework to provide students with an overview of social practice as it relates to the human body.
Instructors: Seetah, K. (PI)

ANTHRO 116: Data Analysis for Quantitative Research (ANTHRO 216)

This course allows graduate and advanced undergraduate students in archaeology and anthropology to acquire practical skills in quantitative data analysis. Some familiarity with basic statistical methods is useful but not assumed; the structure of the course will be flexible enough to accommodate a range of student expertise and interests. Topics covered include: statistics and graphics in R; database design, resampling methods, diversity measures, contingency table analysis, and introductory methods in spatial analysis.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci

ANTHRO 118: Heritage, Environment, and Sovereignty in Hawaii (EARTHSYS 118)

This course explores the cultural, political economic, and environmental status of contemporary Hawaiians. What sorts of sustainable economic and environmental systems did Hawaiians use in prehistory? How was colonization of the Hawaiian Islands informed and shaped by American economic interests and the nascent imperialsm of the early 20th centrury? How was sovereignty and Native Hawaiian identity been shaped by these forces? How has tourism and the leisure industry affected the natural environment? This course uses archaeological methods, ethnohistorical sources, and historical analysis in an exploration of contemporary Hawaiian social economic and political life.
| UG Reqs: WAY-ED
Instructors: Wilcox, M. (PI)

ANTHRO 11SC: Conservation and Development Dilemmas in the Amazon (HUMBIO 18SC)

This course explores the human dimensions of conservation efforts under way in the Amazon Basin of South America. It has two specific goals: (1) to introduce the human ecology of Amazonia; and (2) to assess the prospects for joint efforts at biodiversity conservation and community development. We will draw on case studies to investigate such topics as the causes and consequences of deforestation, the social impact of parks and protected areas, and the potential for "Integrated Conservation and Development Projects" (ICDPs) such as extractive reserves, natural forest management, biodiversity prospecting, and community-based ecotourism. The course views Amazonia as a microcosm of the challenges facing conservation and development efforts today in the Third World. nPart of the course is an intensive 11-day expedition to the Peruvian Amazon, at no extra cost, to observe firsthand the conservation and development dilemmas discussed in class. We will visit ecolodges in the rainforest, walking miles of trails to learn about local flora, fauna, and conservation efforts. We will also visit Machu Picchu in the upper reaches of the rainforest. For the travel portion of the class, undergraduates will be joined by a group of Stanford alumni and friends. nStudent contributions and presentations are emphasized throughout the course. Students are expected to come well-prepared to each session, to lead discussions, and to carry out literature research. The final assignment is a 6 to 8 page paper on a case study of your own choosing¿or an equivalent piece of a longer collaborative paper¿that offers a critical assessment of one particular conservation and/or development project in or near the region we will visit. Students will present the main findings of their papers in a joint seminar of undergraduates and alumni as we travel in the Peruvian Amazon. n nNote: Students will arrive on campus and will be housed at Stanford until we leave for the Amazon. Travel to and from Peru¿organized by the Travel/Study Program of the Stanford Alumni Association¿is included; costs are defrayed by the Stanford Field Seminar Fund and generous donors.

ANTHRO 12: Anthropology and Art

Modernity. How the concept of art appears timeless and commonsensical in the West, and with what social consequences. Historicizing the emergence of art. Modernist uses of primitive, child art, asylum, and outsider art.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum

ANTHRO 126: Urban Culture in Global Perspective (URBANST 114)

Core course for Urban Studies majors. We will study urban space both historically and cross-culturally. Urban Studies, by definition, is an interdisciplinary field, where the methodological approaches draw upon a diverse set of analytic tools. Disciplines that occupy a prominent place in this class are geography, cultural anthropology, sociology, history, media studies, and literature. In this context, we will discuss the importance of cities around the world to the economic, cultural, and political well-being of modern societies and examine how forces such as industrialization, decentralization, and globalization affect the structure and function of cities.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Hansen, T. (PI)
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